75 episodes

The C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago houses a library of audio recordings of lectures dating back 40 years. One of the largest of its kind in the world, this collection is a rich and unique educational resource for anyone with an interest in the well-being of the individual, the community and the culture. Speakers include internationally renowned presenters whose work is at the forefront of psychological thought including Robert Moore, June Singer, Murray Stein, John Beebe, Ann Belford Ulanov, Donald Kalsched, Andrew Samuels, Ashok Bedi, Jean Shinoda Bolen, and many others.

Jungianthology Podcast C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago

    • Science

The C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago houses a library of audio recordings of lectures dating back 40 years. One of the largest of its kind in the world, this collection is a rich and unique educational resource for anyone with an interest in the well-being of the individual, the community and the culture. Speakers include internationally renowned presenters whose work is at the forefront of psychological thought including Robert Moore, June Singer, Murray Stein, John Beebe, Ann Belford Ulanov, Donald Kalsched, Andrew Samuels, Ashok Bedi, Jean Shinoda Bolen, and many others.

    The Discipline to Stay with the Symbol: Interview with Director of Training Warren Sibilla

    The Discipline to Stay with the Symbol: Interview with Director of Training Warren Sibilla

    We are now accepting application for the Analyst Training Program. If you are interested in becoming a Jungian analyst, or just want to learn more visit the ATP page on our website. The deadline to apply is January 15, 2022.







    In this episode, Patricia Martin interviews Warren W. Sibilla, Jr, Jungian Psychoanalyst and the new Director of Training for the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago’s Analyst Training Program. How does someone know they are ready for training? What is the process of development in training like? What does Jungian analysis and study bring to someone’s life and practice?







    Dr. Sibilla is an athlete who competes in endurance sports like the Ironman and Spartan Obstacle Race. How has this discipline manifested in Dr. Sibilla’s own analytic practice? Does that lead to a particular framing about the practice of psychology and analysis? In this discussion they touch on:







    The SymbolThe UnconsciousThe SelfIndividuationThe ShadowDisciplineAnalytic Training







    The interview was recorded in August 2021, before the current year of the Analyst Training Program began.















    Warren Sibilla, Jr, PhD is a Diplomate Jungian Psychoanalyst with a clinical practice in Chicago, IL and South Bend, IN.  Dr. Sibilla served as the Director of the Clinical Training Program (2010 – 2014) at the Institute and is the incoming Director of Training for the 2021-2022 year of the Analyst Training Program.  He is engaged in the study and practice of Zen Buddhism including authoring a book on the relationship between Zen Buddhism and Analytical Psychology as well as a paper formally exploring Jung’s 1958 dialogue with Japanese Zen Master and Philosopher Hisamatsu. He is author of My Journey to Ironman: Endurance Sports as a Means to Individuation. Dr. Sibilla teaches in the Masters and Doctoral programs at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology and The Institute for Clinical Social Work and facilitates silent contemplative retreats at GilChrist Retreat Center in Michigan.







    Dr. Sibilla graduated from the California School of Professional Psychology in 1993. Since earning his Ph.D., he has received a post-doctorate diploma in Object Relations Theory and Practice. Additionally, he has earned the professional title of Psychoanalyst. Finally, he has completed the training to serve as a court appointed Parent Coordinator and Domestic Relations Mediator. He is the President of the Child Development and Psychological Health Center maintaining a private practice specializing in forensic psychology including proficiency with court ordered psychological consultations and assessments with children, adolescents, and adults. He provides psychotherapy and psychoanalysis to children, adolescents, and adults. Finally, Dr. Sibilla provides professional consultation and supervision to many mental health practices and individual clinicians.







    Dr. Sibilla is married; he and his wife have four children. In addition to family responsibilities, Dr. Sibilla is an avid triathlete, currently competing in Ironman distance triathlons, marathons, and ultra-distance marathons.















    Patricia Martin is a cultural analyst, consultant, and the author of three books on cultural trends.

    • 39 min
    The Archetype of Sacrifice and the Regulation of Archetypal Energy

    The Archetype of Sacrifice and the Regulation of Archetypal Energy

    with Robert Moore, PhD







    This episode is the Saturday morning session of a weekend taught by Robert Moore called The Archetype of Sacrifice and the Regulation of Archetypal Energy. From the seminar description:







    This workshop links Jung’s alchemical studies and his examination of the archetype of sacrifice to more recent research into the nature and dynamics of grandiose energies in the human psyche. In this program Robert Moore discusses how the decline of ritual containment of these energies in indigenous and traditional cultures has led to an epidemic of increased anxiety, addiction, and violent acting out.First, Moore introduces the role of the archetype of sacrifice and related techniques of ritual practice in human strategies of coping with the pressures of archetypal energies. Second, he links the failure of these traditional means to our current epidemic of narcissistic acting out. Third, he summarizes the ways in which recent research supports Jung and Edinger on the necessity of the achievement of an ego-Self axis – a conscious and willed sacrificial attitude in the individuation process. Finally, Moore outlines the clinical implications: the ways in which we must be much more specific in our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the ego-Self axis in relation to the analytical task. He discusses the implications of this understanding of sacrifice for our conceptualization of a truly Jungian understanding of a psychoanalytic “cure” – the task of optimizing the analysand’s conscious regulation of archetypal energies. In short, Dr. Moore argues that Jungian Analysis should return to its roots in a manner which draws upon the best in recent interdisciplinary research to build upon Jung’s foundational discoveries.







    It was recorded on May 24 and 25, 2003.







    In this recording, Moore mentions some of his seminars, including Mythology of the Great Self Within, Transforming Fire: Understanding, Accessing and Regulating Psychic and Spiritual Energy, Ego and Archetype: The Genius of Edward Edinger.















    Robert Moore, PhD was Distinguished Service Professor of Psychology, Psychoanalysis and Spirituality in the Graduate Center of the Chicago Theological Seminary where he was the Founding Director of the new Institute for Advanced Studies in Spirituality and Wellness. An internationally recognized psychoanalyst and consultant in private practice in Chicago, he served as a Training Analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago and was Director of Research for the Institute for Integrative ...

    • 2 hrs 14 min
    Healing Cinema: Rear Window

    Healing Cinema: Rear Window

    In this episode, Jungian Analysts Judith Cooper and Daniel Ross discuss Alfred Hitchcock’s 1954 film Rear Window (Wikipedia). They touch on:











    * Creative vision* Post WWII social change* Anima/Animus* Puer & Senex* Projection* Fear of intimacy & marriage* Voyeurism



















    * Masculine and feminine* Coniunctio* Patriarchal gaze* The Tale of Blue Beard (Wikipedia)* The Shadow* The Trickster



























    Judith Cooper, PsyD is a clinical psychologist and diplomate Jungian Analyst in private practice in Chicago. She is a graduate and member of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago. She was adjunct faculty at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology (1999-2000), teaching projective testing. She was clinical supervisor (1991-2002) and director of training (1998-2002) of an APA-accredited psychology internship program at a community mental health center in northwest Indiana. She has taught in the Analyst Training Program and lectured on the anima/animus, and the clinical use of film.















    Daniel Ross, RN, PMHNP, MSN, MBA has been a nurse for 40 years and in hospice for over 30.  As a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and Jungian Analyst, he brings a medical, psychiatric, and analytical perspective to the field of end-of-life care.  He first completed the two-year Clinical Training Program (now the JPP/JSP) at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago then went on to complete the Analyst Training Program.  He is in private practice in the northwest suburbs working with adults seeking psychotherapy and continues to see hospice and palliative care patients at the end of life.  He is Co-Director of the Jungian Psychotherapy Program and Jungian Studies Program at the C. G.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    The Adventure of Being Human: Beyond the Myth of Biological Salvation

    The Adventure of Being Human: Beyond the Myth of Biological Salvation

    with Polly Young-Eisendrath, PhD







    This episode is the opening lecture of a weekend given by Polly Young-Eisendrath. It contains a 1-hour lecture followed by an hour of Q&A. From the seminar description:















    We all sense a connection with the source that underlies our existence, whether or not we recognize it as such and we all wish to identify with something larger than ourselves. Some feel this as a spiritual yearning, while others wish for fame or celebrity or the knowledge of a larger truth. The spiritual isolation and materialism (both economic and philosophical) of our times make it difficult to find trustworthy methods from institutional religions, non-traditional approaches, psychology, or philosophy for seeking knowledge of this source. However, our desire to help others (and ourselves) and our willingness to love deeply and authentically can offer the common ground through which we can find this knowledge, but it requires a dedicated understanding of our own suffering and its transformation.Instead of seeking such insight into our subjective lives, we Americans embrace popular myths of biological salvation and pharmaceutical soothing. It?s not just that we seek instant solutions to complex problems, rather we have lost our taste for the adventure of human life, replacing it with ideals of economic and biological ?security? and hopes for absolute control of our diet and health.This program offers a critique of this contemporary myth of biological salvation and presents accounts from psychoanalysis (Jungian and otherwise) and Buddhism of how embracing our limitations can open the path to transformation and lasting contentment.







    The weekend continues with Part 2 – Living and Loving in the Human Realm







    Building on the presentation The Adventure of Being Human, this workshop investigates the challenges of human life through an exploration of our difficulties with perfectionism, the three types of suffering we encounter, and the ways in which love challenges us to develop a true discipline of our hearts. Among other things, this program explores mythologies, the Human Realm (from Buddhism), the inner critic of perfectionism, the value of the human sciences, and the differences between the two major sciences of subjectivity: psychoanalysis and Buddhism.







    It was recorded in October 2001, so there is some discussion of the 9/11 attacks and related issues.







    Note: In the Q&A portion, questioners were not microphoned and so the volume was very low. We’ve increased the volume, but they are still somewhat difficult to understand against the background noise, and back-and-forth is somewhat disorienting because of the frequent changes in amplification.















    Polly Young-Eisendrath, PhD is Clinical Associate Professor of psychiatry at the University of Vermont Medical College. She is a psychologist and Jungian analyst practicing in the mountains of central Vermont, where she lives and writes. She has published thirteen books, many chapters and articles that have been translated into fourteen languages. Her books include The Self-Esteem Trap: Raising Confident and Compassionate Kids in an Age of Self-Importance, a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="http://amzn.

    • 2 hrs 26 min
    Animating Female Archetypes & Telling Women’s Stories: Interview with Elizabeth Lesser

    Animating Female Archetypes & Telling Women’s Stories: Interview with Elizabeth Lesser

    Best-selling author Elizabeth Lesser sat down with us to discuss her latest book, Cassandra Speaks: When Women are the Storytellers, the Human Story Changes. Elizabeth is the co-founder of the Omega Institute in Rhinebeck, NY. In the interview, Lesser talks about new models of power with host Patricia Martin and explains why feminine archetypes and female myths are so resonant today. Offering bright insights and deep wisdom, Lesser touches on several of Jung’s theories, including anima and animus, and shares a gem-like memory of Jungian analyst Marion Woodman, who led workshops at the Omega Center during its early years. Having Elizabeth Lesser on Jungianthology was profoundly inspiring; and we invite you to listen for yourself. In this interview they touch on:







    The Omega Institute The Omega Women’s Leadership CenterArchetypesPower and abuse of powerMasculine theories of leadershipGreek mythology as written by menThe myth of CassandraMarion WoodmanAnima/AnimusSimone BilesHow gender roles are changingFeminist theories and practices of powerHow “feminine-ist” power is necessary to face contemporary problems







    Elizabeth Lesser is the author of several bestselling books, including Cassandra Speaks: When Women are the Storytellers, the Human Story Changes, Broken Open: How Difficult Times Can Help Us Grow, and Marrow: Love, Loss & What Matters Most. She is the cofounder of Omega Institute, recognized internationally for its workshops and conferences in wellness, spirituality, creativity, and social change. She has given two popular TED talks, and is one of Oprah Winfrey’s Super Soul 100, a collection of a hundred leaders who are using their voices and talent to elevate humanity.















    Patricia Martin is a cultural analyst, consultant, and the author of three books on cultural trends. As a consultant, Martin has worked on teams at Discovery Communications, Dannon, Microsoft, Ms. Foundation for Women, Oracle, Unisys, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the New York Philharmonic, to name a few. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Harvard Business Review, USA Today, and Advertising Age. A blogger since 2002, Martin was a regular contributor to Huffington Post during its start-up years. She earned a B.A. in English and sociology from Michigan State University and an M.A. in Irish literature and culture from the University College Dublin. Later,

    • 48 min
    Healing Cinema: Gaslight

    Healing Cinema: Gaslight

    This episode is the first in a new series called Healing Cinema. Judith Cooper, PsyD, and Daniel Ross, PMHNP, members of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts, discuss films from an Jungian point of view. These informal discussions will be released in parallel with our other episodes (lectures from our archives and interviews by Patricia Martin) and will not be on any particular schedule.







    In this episode, Judith and Dan discuss the 1944 film Gaslight (Wikipedia). They mention the fairy tale “Fitcher’s Bird”, so if you want to learn more about that, you can read about it on Wikipedia. They also touch on the following:











    * Alchemy* Animus/Anima* Beebe, John* Blackbeard fairytale* Hillman, James* Imposter Syndrome* Initiation* Kalsched, Donald











    * Numinous* Puella* Senex* Splendor Solis* Telos* Transcendent Function* Trauma* Trickster



















    Judith Cooper, PsyD is a clinical psychologist and diplomate Jungian Analyst in private practice in Chicago. She is a graduate and member of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago. She was adjunct faculty at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology (1999-2000), teaching projective testing. She was clinical supervisor (1991-2002) and director of training (1998-2002) of an APA-accredited psychology internship program at a community mental health center in northwest Indiana. She has taught in the Analyst Training Program and lectured on the anima/animus, and the clinical use of film.















    Daniel Ross, RN, PMHNP, MSN, MBA has been a nurse for 40 years and in hospice for over 30.  As a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and Jungian Analyst, he brings a medical, psychiatric, and analytical perspective to the field of end-of-life care.  He first completed the two-year Clinical Training Program (now the a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://jungchicago.org/store/index.php?

    • 1 hr 13 min

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