300 episodes

VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts. With VETgirl, you can learn clinical veterinary medicine with style, passion, and efficiency! VETgirl is designed for veterinary professionals who have time poverty and are on the run. Who has time to read journals or sit through hours of lectures? Download the podcasts you want to listen to, and get clinical tips within just a few minutes of listening! We'll help get you the facts you need in a convenient way! Want more information? Go to JoinVETgirl.com.

VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts Dr. Justine Lee, DACVECC, DABT and Dr. Garret Pachinger, DACVECC

    • Education

VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts. With VETgirl, you can learn clinical veterinary medicine with style, passion, and efficiency! VETgirl is designed for veterinary professionals who have time poverty and are on the run. Who has time to read journals or sit through hours of lectures? Download the podcasts you want to listen to, and get clinical tips within just a few minutes of listening! We'll help get you the facts you need in a convenient way! Want more information? Go to JoinVETgirl.com.

    Lung ultrasonography findings in coughing dogs | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    Lung ultrasonography findings in coughing dogs | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    In this VETgirl online veterinary CE podcast, we review lung utlrasonography use in coughing dogs. Coughing is a common clinical sign associated with a variety of respiratory etiologies in dogs, including dynamic airway collapse, bronchitis, pneumonia, heartworm disease, and neoplasia. Congestive heart failure (CHF) is commonly reported to be associated with coughing in dogs, although there is much debate as to whether this clinical sign could actually be directly attributable to pulmonary edema (which is generally interstitial or alveolar in location) given the distribution of cough receptors primarily in the large airways. It is possible that coughing in dogs with congestive heart failure is due to cardiogenic airway compression, or concurrent primary respiratory disease.

    • 9 min
    Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease with Dr. Sheri Ross | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease with Dr. Sheri Ross | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    In today's VETgirl online veterinary CE podcast, we interview Dr. Sheri Ross, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, the Coordinator of Hemodialysis/ Nephrology/Urology at the University of California Veterinary Medical Center - San Diego on Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD) in cats. Should we be prescribing antimicrobials? What do we do to work up FLUTD? What behavioral, environmental, and nutritional factors play a role in this common disease?

    • 34 min
    Rectally administered levetiracetam in dogs with cluster seizures | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    Rectally administered levetiracetam in dogs with cluster seizures | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    In this VETGirl podcast, we discuss the efficacy of the anti-epileptic medication, levetiracetam, when given rectally in dogs. There are few things more frightening for an owner than witnessing a seizure in their dog, and cluster seizures (CS) and status epilepticus (SE) are particularly scary! Unfortunately as veterinarians, we have somewhat limited emergency interventional options that we can offer to owners when CS or SE occurs at home. The administration of oral medications is problematic due to risks of an inadvertent bite, difficulty or inability for the patient to swallow, and of course the risk of aspiration. Perhaps the most common emergency therapy for SE in dogs is rectally administered diazepam, which is the preferred rectally-administered emergency medication in human medicine as well (Podell, Brophy). Levetiracetam has become an increasingly popular maintenance therapy for seizure management in small animal medicine, and recent studies have demonstrated that rectally-administered levetiracetam at 40 mg/kg effectively reaches target concentrations in both healthy and epileptic dogs (Peters, Cagnotti). That said, no studies have investigated how well rectal levetiracetam performs clinically, which is what we really care about, right?

    • 7 min
    Association between life span and body condition in neutered dogs | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    Association between life span and body condition in neutered dogs | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    How many of us dread having “the talk” with clients? That one where you brace yourself for the response you know these words are going to elicit from the client across you… "Your pet is obese." Perhaps an angry client reaction is brought about out of shame for letting their pet get fat, or from the implication that their shower of love and affection in the form of kibble and treats is slowly killing their beloved pet. This is undeniably a tricky conversation to have with owners, but it is a real concern for our patient's overall health. We can tell owners that by allowing their pets to remain obese, they are increasing their pet's risk for CCL rupture (Adams), arthritis (Yamka), diabetes mellitus, and cancer (Lund). These diseases seem so elusive and far-off to the pet parent paying more attention to their cute puppy dancing around the room than to your education. But what if you were to tell the client that obesity will shorten their pet's lifespan and the time they have left with their pet? Studies under controlled conditions have already documented this relationship between a longer lifespan derived from limited volumes of food in a colony of Labrador Retrievers (Kealy).

    • 8 min
    Using steroids in dogs with acute pancreatitis | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    Using steroids in dogs with acute pancreatitis | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    In today's VETgirl online veterinary continuing education podcast, we will be reviewing a treatment that is often a bit controversial -; steroids! In particular, we will look at the use of steroids in the treatment of acute pancreatitis in dogs. Steroids may appear attractive to use in this inflammatory disease since glucocorticoids impart anti-inflammatory affects in the body. Glucocorticoids may theoretically improve pancreatic blood flow and in critically ill patients with refractory blood pressure concerns, glucocorticoids are sometimes used to treat suspected (or confirmed) CIRCI. But with the possibility of eliciting negative side effects from steroid use, owing to their unwanted gastrointestinal tract side effects and their immunomodulatory effects, are they worth the risk in treating these patients?

    • 9 min
    The use of telmisartan for the treatment of systemic hypertension in cats | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    The use of telmisartan for the treatment of systemic hypertension in cats | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

    In today's VETgirl online veterinary continuing education podcast, we review the use of telmisartan for the treatment of systemic hypertension in cats. Systemic hypertension (SH) in aged cats is predominantly due to chronic kidney disease (CKD), hyperthyroidism, or considered idiopathic. Downstream end-organ effects of chronic systemic hypertension target the eyes, myocardium, central nervous system, and kidneys (specifically, worsened renal function and proteinuria). Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) system contributes to development of SH in many cases and drugs that inhibit this system have treatment potential. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) specifically block the angiotensin II, subtype-1 receptor (AT1) therefore inhibiting angiotensin II, which causes vasoconstriction, volume retention, sympathetic stimulation, inflammation, and fibrosis.

    • 9 min

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