3 episodes

At 21, Dr Jersey Jellgood was the youngest ever winner of the Nobel Prize, receiving the accolade for a chemistry paper he had written as a six year-old. He remains the only man to win the Nobel Grand Slam, picking up prizes for Chemistry, Physics, Medicine, Peace and Literature, all before his 25th birthday. His discoveries in the field of chemistry alone earned him billions. And yet, prior to his 27th birthday, Dr Jellgood abandoned the world of conventional science, pursuing flamboyant and baffling ventures, most notably sending over sixty sumo wrestlers to the moon merely to collect specimens for his own Japanese rock garden. His departure from scientific research was, they said, the most horrifying waste of talent in history. “Quite simply, he could’ve solved everything”. Why Dr Jellgood abandoned conventional science and what he went on to achieve were detailed in a remarkable series of interviews stretching over five decades on the British radio programme I Am Science. I Am Science was hosted by the prominent English journalist Rodney Borgnine and was the longest running radio interview programme in broadcast history. Guests included Laura Limb, inventor of the Yasser Ara-Fat Burner, Tonya Pol, CEO of Toe Job Taxis, and Holman Garido, founder of gynaecological amusement park, Treasure Island. However, it was Borgnine’s conversations with Dr Jellgood that most cemented the programme’s reputation. The first interview, airing in August 1965, drew 46 million viewers, the largest radio audience in history – a record which still stands to this day. Borgnine would interview Dr Jellgood over fifty times in the coming years. Each instalment followed Dr Jersey Jellgood as he dropped one failed business enterprise for the next, repeatedly misapplying the most competent scientific brain in the world. The Borgnine-Jellgood interviews would become the subject of a play starring Olga Potts and Clooney Dempsey, and was later made into an Oscar winning feature film directed by Wesley Thomas Abrams. A novelistic account is released in June, and a board game entitled Be A Danger To Yourself is in the works. The early interviews were thought lost forever, until tape recordings were found last year in the warehouses of a radio station in Mexico. Three episodes are available here for the first time, the first examining Jellgood’s entry into space tourism, the second his combination of quantum physics and cooking, and the final episode following his career as Chief Scientific Advisor to the UK Defence Department. Title music by Tim Donderevo.

I Am Science Barney Brown and Nick Osbourne

    • Comedy

At 21, Dr Jersey Jellgood was the youngest ever winner of the Nobel Prize, receiving the accolade for a chemistry paper he had written as a six year-old. He remains the only man to win the Nobel Grand Slam, picking up prizes for Chemistry, Physics, Medicine, Peace and Literature, all before his 25th birthday. His discoveries in the field of chemistry alone earned him billions. And yet, prior to his 27th birthday, Dr Jellgood abandoned the world of conventional science, pursuing flamboyant and baffling ventures, most notably sending over sixty sumo wrestlers to the moon merely to collect specimens for his own Japanese rock garden. His departure from scientific research was, they said, the most horrifying waste of talent in history. “Quite simply, he could’ve solved everything”. Why Dr Jellgood abandoned conventional science and what he went on to achieve were detailed in a remarkable series of interviews stretching over five decades on the British radio programme I Am Science. I Am Science was hosted by the prominent English journalist Rodney Borgnine and was the longest running radio interview programme in broadcast history. Guests included Laura Limb, inventor of the Yasser Ara-Fat Burner, Tonya Pol, CEO of Toe Job Taxis, and Holman Garido, founder of gynaecological amusement park, Treasure Island. However, it was Borgnine’s conversations with Dr Jellgood that most cemented the programme’s reputation. The first interview, airing in August 1965, drew 46 million viewers, the largest radio audience in history – a record which still stands to this day. Borgnine would interview Dr Jellgood over fifty times in the coming years. Each instalment followed Dr Jersey Jellgood as he dropped one failed business enterprise for the next, repeatedly misapplying the most competent scientific brain in the world. The Borgnine-Jellgood interviews would become the subject of a play starring Olga Potts and Clooney Dempsey, and was later made into an Oscar winning feature film directed by Wesley Thomas Abrams. A novelistic account is released in June, and a board game entitled Be A Danger To Yourself is in the works. The early interviews were thought lost forever, until tape recordings were found last year in the warehouses of a radio station in Mexico. Three episodes are available here for the first time, the first examining Jellgood’s entry into space tourism, the second his combination of quantum physics and cooking, and the final episode following his career as Chief Scientific Advisor to the UK Defence Department. Title music by Tim Donderevo.

    #3: Defence

    #3: Defence

    In Episode 3, Rodney Borgnine catches up with Dr Jellgood after he has made another startling occupational U-turn, this time working for the British Government as Chief Scientific Advisor to the Defence Department. In a revealing interview, Jellgood talks about his support for conscription, warns of the very real threat to time and space posed by Stephen Hawking, explains why all nuclear warheads should be kept in the warehouses of Argos, and goes into disgusting detail about the Prime Minister’s misshapen testicles. Episode music by Barney Brown. I Am Science theme tune by Tim Donderevo.

    • 19 min
    #2: Food

    #2: Food

    The second interview between Rodney Borgnine and Dr Jersey Jellgood takes place 10 years after their first encounter in Tokyo. After his space tourism business has gone under, Jellgood becomes a chef, launching a new culinary brand called quooking – a mystifying combination of cooking and quantum physics. This follow-up interview takes place in London as Jellgood promotes his new Quooking restaurant at St Paul’s. The Dr’s Quooking restaurants have been a success all around the world, serving up strange cosmic culinary phenomena such as the Stephen Hawking Hover Sausage and The Peking Death Mirror. Each dish is more complex and perilous scientific experiment than simple cooking, and as chefs in bio-hazard suits prepare food for the opening night in London, Borgnine confronts Dr Jellgood about the dangers posed by these creations, not only to the staff and the paying public, but to the solar system itself. Episode music by Rob Fisher. I Am Science theme tune by Tim Donderevo.

    • 17 min
    #1: Space and death

    #1: Space and death

    Episode 1 captures the very first interview between journalist Rodney Borgnine and multi-Nobel winning scientist Dr Jersey Jellgood. In this opening instalment, Jersey is living in Tokyo, where he is operating his own space tourism business, most notable for putting the first sumo on the moon. Throughout the interview, Borgnine presses Jellgood on the treatment of his space sumos, questioning the thoroughness of their training and the inadequacy of their under-sized, helmetless space suits, and finally forces the great scientist to concede that some sumo astronauts have indeed “popped” in space. Borgnine also interrogates the safety of burial and cremation services offered by Jellgood’s space tourism company, after shocking YouTube footage revealed mourners in ripped space suits being chased around the moon’s surface by the floating ashes of their dearly departed. Music and additional production by Tim Donderevo.

    • 28 min

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