300 episodios

A collection of public lectures either given at, or by members of, the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.

Cambridge Law: Public Lectures from the Faculty of Law Cambridge University

    • Noticias

A collection of public lectures either given at, or by members of, the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.

    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The Prisons' (audio)

    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The Prisons' (audio)

    In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.

    In this second webinar we look at the current conditions in English prisons and explore why more has not been done for those in custody throughout the pandemic.

    At the beginning of April, the government announced plans for the early release of up to 4,000 prisoners in England and Wales, to reduce prison overcrowding and to slow the rate of infection among prisoners and staff. The Prison Governors Association and Public Health England argued that releasing 10,000 - 15,000 prisoners was needed. By late April, though, a mere 33 prisoners had been released. What went wrong? What has happened throughout May? What have been the implications for the welfare/health/progression of both prisoners and staff? What are the lessons to be learnt now, and for the future - within the prison and probation systems?

    Discussing the issues:

    Chair: Nicky Padfield, Professor of Criminal and Penal Justice

    Nicky is joined by a panel of experts:

    - Andrea Albutt (President, Prison Governors Association);
    - Richard Garside (Director, Centre for Crime and Justice Studies);
    - Laura Janes (Legal Director, Howard League for Penal Reform);
    - (Retired) Judge John Samuels QC (ex-Parole Board and President, Prisoners' Education Trust); and
    - Jessie Smith (Cambridge PhD candidate in Law, solicitor, formerly specialising in national security).

    This entry provides an audio source.

    • 1h 2 min
    • video
    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The Prisons'

    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The Prisons'

    In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.

    In this second webinar we look at the current conditions in English prisons and explore why more has not been done for those in custody throughout the pandemic.

    At the beginning of April, the government announced plans for the early release of up to 4,000 prisoners in England and Wales, to reduce prison overcrowding and to slow the rate of infection among prisoners and staff. The Prison Governors Association and Public Health England argued that releasing 10,000 - 15,000 prisoners was needed. By late April, though, a mere 33 prisoners had been released. What went wrong? What has happened throughout May? What have been the implications for the welfare/health/progression of both prisoners and staff? What are the lessons to be learnt now, and for the future - within the prison and probation systems?

    Discussing the issues:

    Chair: Nicky Padfield, Professor of Criminal and Penal Justice

    Nicky is joined by a panel of experts:

    - Andrea Albutt (President, Prison Governors Association);
    - Richard Garside (Director, Centre for Crime and Justice Studies);
    - Laura Janes (Legal Director, Howard League for Penal Reform);
    - (Retired) Judge John Samuels QC (ex-Parole Board and President, Prisoners' Education Trust); and
    - Jessie Smith (Cambridge PhD candidate in Law, solicitor, formerly specialising in national security).

    • 1h 2 min
    • video
    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The courts'

    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The courts'

    In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.

    In the first event, our focus is the courts and we explore the reality of daily life in magistrates’ courts and in the Crown Court, from bail applications to sentencing. What has happened to the right to trial by jury? What will be the impact of the pandemic on the rights of defendants and victims, both in the short and the long term? What are the lessons to be learnt from video-justice? Could HMCTS and the judiciary have been better prepared?

    Discussing the issues:

    Chair: Nicky Padfield, Professor of Criminal and Penal Justice

    Nicky is joined by a panel of experts:

    - Amanda Pinto Q.C. (Chair of The Bar Council);
    - Simon Davis (President of The Law Society);
    - Ian Kelcey (Criminal Solicitor Advocate); and
    - Abimbola Johnson (Criminal Barrister).

    • 1h 1m
    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The courts' (audio)

    Webinar: 'Criminal Justice in a Pandemic: The courts' (audio)

    In these two public webinars from the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge, the panels explore the enormous additional pressures that the pandemic has imposed on the criminal justice system.

    In the first event, our focus is the courts and we explore the reality of daily life in magistrates’ courts and in the Crown Court, from bail applications to sentencing. What has happened to the right to trial by jury? What will be the impact of the pandemic on the rights of defendants and victims, both in the short and the long term? What are the lessons to be learnt from video-justice? Could HMCTS and the judiciary have been better prepared?

    Discussing the issues:

    Chair: Nicky Padfield, Professor of Criminal and Penal Justice

    Nicky is joined by a panel of experts:

    - Amanda Pinto Q.C. (Chair of The Bar Council);
    - Simon Davis (President of The Law Society);
    - Ian Kelcey (Criminal Solicitor Advocate); and
    - Abimbola Johnson (Criminal Barrister).

    This item provides an audio source.

    • 1h 1m
    • video
    The repatriation of offshore finance to onshore: transnational legal orders and the Cayman Islands experience

    The repatriation of offshore finance to onshore: transnational legal orders and the Cayman Islands experience

    A webinar hosted by the Cambridge Socio-Legal Group.

    May Hen-Smith is a PhD student in Sociology at Cambridge. She is a former tax collector from Canada Revenue Agency and studies offshore financial centres. She is also co-founder of the Cambridge Tax Discussion Group, a student-led discussion group which began in 2015 and continues to meet weekly during term to talk about all things tax. Their website is taxtaxtax.tax

    More information can be found at:

    https://research.sociology.cam.ac.uk/profile/may-hen-smith

    This presentation will discuss my PhD work which takes an ethnographic approach to the study of Cayman Islands professionals to understand how an offshore financial centre operates from the perspective of the professionals who live and work in them. It offers a close-examination of a single jurisdiction, one that is heavily referred to by critics of offshore, and brings new empirical data based on 13-months of fieldwork from a jurisdiction heavily used by some of the largest financial transactions in the world.

    Supported by the Centre for Tax Law.

    • 1h 9 min
    The repatriation of offshore finance to onshore: transnational legal orders and the Cayman Islands experience (audio)

    The repatriation of offshore finance to onshore: transnational legal orders and the Cayman Islands experience (audio)

    A webinar hosted by the Cambridge Socio-Legal Group.

    May Hen-Smith is a PhD student in Sociology at Cambridge. She is a former tax collector from Canada Revenue Agency and studies offshore financial centres. She is also co-founder of the Cambridge Tax Discussion Group, a student-led discussion group which began in 2015 and continues to meet weekly during term to talk about all things tax. Their website is taxtaxtax.tax

    More information can be found at:

    https://research.sociology.cam.ac.uk/profile/may-hen-smith

    This presentation will discuss my PhD work which takes an ethnographic approach to the study of Cayman Islands professionals to understand how an offshore financial centre operates from the perspective of the professionals who live and work in them. It offers a close-examination of a single jurisdiction, one that is heavily referred to by critics of offshore, and brings new empirical data based on 13-months of fieldwork from a jurisdiction heavily used by some of the largest financial transactions in the world.

    Supported by the Centre for Tax Law.

    This entry provides an audio source.

    • 1h 9 min

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