38 Folgen

Join Adam and Anne as they talk about living a low-carb, high-fat lifestyle in a family setting. Each episode, they'll share news about LCHF eating, recipes, and encouragement. Look for them on Facebook as LCHF Family, on twitter as @LCHFFamily, or at their website, lchf.familypodcasts.com

LCHF Family Family Podcasts Network

    • Gesundheit und Fitness

Join Adam and Anne as they talk about living a low-carb, high-fat lifestyle in a family setting. Each episode, they'll share news about LCHF eating, recipes, and encouragement. Look for them on Facebook as LCHF Family, on twitter as @LCHFFamily, or at their website, lchf.familypodcasts.com

    Episode 38: Trans Fats and the Magic Pill

    Episode 38: Trans Fats and the Magic Pill

    038: Trans Fats and The Magic Pill Released: June 28, 2018
    Abby is back! Join her and Anne as they discuss the news about the banning of trans fats from the US food supply and the documentary The Magic Pill. Before we go any further into our show notes for this episode: apologies for the sound quality in this episode. We moved on piece of furniture in the room where we record and apparently that turned the room into a bottomless chasm. We learned our lesson and will be back to former quality in our next episode, which will be in early August. We are taking July off for the summer. News Artificial trans fats are officially banned from supermarkets and restaurants in the US. Three years ago, food producers were given a June 18, 2018 deadline to remove trans fats from their products. Since then, 98% of trans fats have been removed. They have been linked to a  myriad of health woes including diabetes and heart disease. Will America as a whole see a decline in this chronic illnesses like Belgium and New York City experienced after their bans? We hope so, but we'll have to wait a few years to see. (Incidentally, we wonder aloud on the podcast about Crisco, which was basically a tub of trans fats. Turns out, it only took them a year to change their formula to be trans-fat free. Curious. What IS that stuff now?!) The Magic Pill documentary The Magic Pill is a podcast following the lives of various people with various health concerns as they switch to a ketogenic diet. Have your tissues handy, because this is a tear jerker! The filmmakers boil the ketogenic diet down to 10 steps: 1. Eat whole food. 2. Choose organic. 3. Eliminate processed foods. 4. Eliminate grains and legumes. 5. Embrace healthy fats. 6. Avoid dairy or opt for full-fat options. 7. Eat naturally raised meats. 8. Eat nose-to-tail. 9. Eat fermented foods. 10. Fast intermittently. Anne and Abby offer commentary on these steps and share their favorite transformations from the film, which should hold the attention of kids tweenish-aged and older. If you have a kid who is a reluctant LCHFer or who is constantly asking questions or who needs more resources to explain this way of eating to others, this is a great resource. Watch it as a family and be ready with the pause button to address their questions as you go along. Summer Reading One of the experts featured in the film is Lierre Keith, who wrote The Vegetarian Myth. This is an excellent book that compassionately addresses the standard arguments in favor of vegetarianism and veganism. As a former vegan herself, Keith's arguments are persuasive. But they can also be pessimistic overall. While this book would be a good counter argument for kids who want to dabble in veganism and vegetarianism, I suggest it be read in conjunction with The Rational Optimist by Matt Ridley, which argues that the world is not as messed up as we are led to believe by certain activists and the main stream media. Many thanks to Lee Rosevere at Free Music Archive for the music we use in the podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the podcast through iTunes or your podcatcher of choice so new episodes arrive automatically. For more support, like and follow the community on Facebook, and check out our website! Please assume any links in the show notes that go to business sites are affiliate links. Purchasing things from our affiliates through those likes us pay for hosting fees and equipment for the podcast. You can see a list of our partners on the Support the Show page.

    • 39 Min.
    Episode 037: Insulin, AMPK and mTOR

    Episode 037: Insulin, AMPK and mTOR

    037: Insulin, AMPK, and mTOR Released: June 14, 2018
    News The Express UK had a story recently on a recommendation made by the Arthritis Foundation that people stop using vegetable oils. Industrially produced vegetable oils, such as corn, afflower, sunflow, soy, and canola oils, contain large amounts of omega-6 oils. While omega-6 oils are necessary for our bodies, the American diet tends to involve way more omega-6 fats than we need, to the point that they can interfere with the proper functionality of our bodies and, in some cases, may promote cancer. Rather, the Arthritis Foundation recommends people swap their liquid oils to healthier olive oil. As proponents of low-carb, high-fat eating, we also recommend coconut oil, avocado oil, butter, or bacon grease. Insulin, AMPK, and mTOR Adam has been reading a lot of Dr. Jason Fung's work lately, and took the time in this episode to give a brief overview of insulin, AMPK, and mTOR. Insulin is a hormone produced in our bodies when we increase our blood sugar. It causes us to store excess sugars as fat. Excess insulin can cause cravings and drive us to eat more than we require. One of the reasons why we avoid carbohydrates is to keep insulin at bay. AMPK plays a role in how our cells handle energy. It discourages energy storage as fat and encourages the production of mitochondria. A low carb diet to the point of ketosis encourages the body to produce and use AMPK. It also has a hand in autophagy--the breaking down of unneeded body tissue to be used where it is needed. Dr. Fung suggests that this is why people who engage in intermittent fasting have less of an issue with extra skin after weight loss than those who rely solely on calorie restriction. MTOR is a growth hormone triggered by excess protein intake. This is great if you're trying to put on muscle, but it can also start to encourage you to eat more, generally. It's important to remember that an LCHF diet should not be high in protein; it should be moderate in protein. For most people, this looks like a protein intake of 60-100 grams per day, depending on your lean body mass and gender. Best Option The Best Option for Panera Bread (Also called St. Louis Bread Company in some areas) was harder than we expected, given Panera's reputation as a healthy fast food. When you get down to ingredient level, most of what they offer has added sugars and industrial oils. There were two options available, though. The first was the Seasonal Green Salad without the dressing. However, this option is simply vegetables and won't be very filling. The best option, therefore, is the Greek Salad, also without salad dressing. Though it would be a "dry" salad for you, the inclusion of olive, pepperoncini, and feta will make it flavorful on it's own, as well as making it more filling. Many thanks to Lee Rosevere at Free Music Archive for the music we use in the podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the podcast through iTunes or your podcatcher of choice so new episodes arrive automatically. For more support, like and follow the community on Facebook, and check out our website! Please assume any links in the show notes that go to business sites are affiliate links. Purchasing things from our affiliates through those likes us pay for hosting fees and equipment for the podcast. You can see a list of our partners on the Support the Show page.

    • 31 Min.
    Episode 36: Italian Food

    Episode 36: Italian Food

    036: Italian Food Released: May 31, 2018
    Adam and Anne chat about different ways you can still enjoy Italian food, either at home or in a restaurant, and keept it LCHF. News But first, our news for the week: CNN reports that childhood obesity is on the rise in Mediterranean countries. As the local diet shifts to include more sugars processed foods and activity levels decline, childhood obesity is spreading through several Mediterranean coutries. We're watching what happens as a traditional diet loses ground to the modern, processed food diet in real time, and the results are not encouraging. Italian Foods You can still enjoy Italian foods when you're eating a low-carb, high-fat diet. First, you need to rethink what it means to eat Italian food--it's not just massive bowls of pasta. In Italy, the pasta is a small course that's not meant to fill you up. Focus on the antipasti (appetizers) that generally include meats, cheese, and veggies, and the secondi course, which usually involves grilled meats and vegetables. Most "family-friendly" Italian restaurants in the US do not follow the traditional Italian model, instead focusing on pasta, pizza, and breaded and fried foods. In that setting, there may be an acceptable salad, or you can order a pizza and eat the toppings only. However, a nicer Italian restaurant should have plenty of options to choose from. If you're looking for Italian options to make at home, you could opt for konjac noodles or spaghetti squash to act as a base for otherwise LCHF sauces, or opt for LCHF "look alikes" like the "Just Like the Real Thing" lasagna, which is a long-time fave in our LCHF family.  We did an episode early on about keto/LCHF pizza options you can make for your family. Check it out here. Best Option When you're out and about and need to eat, the Best Option at Chik-fil-a is... nothing. Same with Domino's. Both restaurants use a lot of soy, industrial oils, and sugars. However, you can eat at Pizza Hut by ordering a pizza and just eating the toppings. Pick from the following list of toppings and load up with the ones you like best: bacon, tomatoes, bell peppers, mushrooms, onions, green chilis, olives, pepperoni, banana peppers, jalapenos, or ham. If you're hankering for some Chick-fil-a, we love this LCHF-friendly taste-alike recipe. Give it a try! Many thanks to Lee Rosevere at Free Music Archive for the music we use in the podcast! Be sure to subscribe to the podcast through iTunes or your podcatcher of choice so new episodes arrive automatically. For more support, like and follow the community on Facebook, and check out our website! Please assume any links in the show notes that go to business sites are affiliate links. Purchasing things from our affiliates through those likes us pay for hosting fees and equipment for the podcast. You can see a list of our partners on the Support the Show page.

    • 28 Min.
    Episode 35: Hiking Snacks

    Episode 35: Hiking Snacks

    035: Hiking Snacks. Released: May 17, 2018
     
    By special request, Adam and Anne take on the issue of what to eat when you're on a day hike with your LCHF family. News * With the end of the school year approaching fast, and summer around the corner, we will be releasing episodes every other week until September. * Those of you with an Amazon Echo can now use it to listen to LCHF Family. To set it up, say the following, pausing between statements:
    Alexa, enable the Low Carb, High Fat Podcast. Alexa, stop.
    When you are ready to listen to the podcast, say, "Alexa, play the Low Carb, High Fat Podcast."
    * We love the Radical Organics Simply Salted Toasted Coconut Chips so much that we way over-bought them as we left the Philippines, so we're going to spread the love. To claim 4 packages of coconut chips, order from one of our affiliates using the links on the Support the Show page. Send a screen shot of your order to lchf@familypodcasts.com. We will confirm the order and send it you your coconut chips. It's that simple! This offer is only available to listeners with mailing addresses in the United States, and it's only available until 10 listeners take advantage of the offer or until September 1, whichever comes first.
    Recommendations Made in the Show
    When planning food for your hike, you need to consider whether the participants are fat adapted or not. If there are participants who are not yet fat adapted, you should plan some snacks for them that are higher in carbohydrates to prevent problems with low blood sugar. Those who are fat adapted may not need to snack between meals at all, but if they do, they can keep their snacks LCHF. Those who are not fat adapted but still hoping to avoid added sugars and processed foods are in luck: keep scrolling through the snow notes for our reciped for Real Food GORP. Epic Hickory Smoked Uncured Bacon and Pork Bites are a sugar-free jerky option that would work well for those who are fat adapted. Other snack options are individually wrapped cheese or a hunk of a hard cheese like parmesan, asiago, or romano. Olives, hard-boiled eggs, and pickles would all be good options, too. Or, keep scrolling through the show notes for a recipe for a Savory GORP designed for people who are fat adapted. Listen to the episode for more food recommendations!If you're concerned about being able to pack in enough water for your hike, check out the Katadyn BeFree or the LifeStraw. There are more options on the REI site as well.
    Recipes Mentioned in the Show
    Real Food GORP
    A filling, flavorful GORP everyone in the family will love, designed especially for those who are not yet fat adapted. Free from inflammatory peanuts, industrial oils, sweeteners, and added sugars.

    1 Tbsp Coconut oil 1 cup cashews, roughly chopped 1/2 cup pecans or walnuts, roughly chopped 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds 1/2 cup toasted coconut chips 1 tsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp salt 1/2 cup raisins 1/2 cup dried cranberries, unsweetened (optional)
    Melt the coconut oil in a 10" skillet over medium-high heat.

    Add nuts, seeds, and coconut chips to the skillet. Stir until warm and well-coated with the coconut oil.

    Sprinkle the mixture with cinnamon and salt and stir until evenly coated.

    Remove from heat and spread the mixture on a cookie sheet to cool quickly. 

    Stir in the raisins and optional dried cranberries.

    Store in an air-tight container when completely cool.




      LCHF GORP
    A healthier GORP option for those who are already fat-adapted.

    1 Tbsp coconut oil 1 cup walnuts, macadamias, or pecans, roughly chopped 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds 1/2 cup toasted coconut chips 1 1/2 tsp Italian seasoning 1 tsp salt 1 cup cheddar Whisps, or all-cheese cracker of your choice, coarsely chopped
    Heat coconut oil in a 10" skillet over medium-high heat.

    Add nuts, seeds, and coconut chips to the skillet. Stir u

    • 29 Min.
    Episode 34: Campfire Foods

    Episode 34: Campfire Foods

    034: Campfire Foods Released: May 10, 2018
    How can your family navigate the memory-making campfire without turning it into a massive sugar bomb? The LCHF Family taste-tested and tinkered with a meal's worth or recipes and came up with a meal that involves cooking on sticks, big flavor, and--yes--dessert. First, they shared an article from the NYTimes that suggests that a low-carb diet may be more benefitial for Type-1 daibetics than previousy believed. Then, they launched into a series of campfire recipes that are sure to please your whole family, with narry a marshmallow in sight. After a brief love-fest for Dropps, they shared the Best Option for when you're starving and your only options are Burger King or Taco Bell. Recipes
    Bacon-Wrapped Brussels Sprouts
    Bacon and brussels sprouts are a family favorite done in the oven, and we were pleasantly surprised to find that they cooked up together beautifully over a campfire. These are a great way to get kids involved with campfire cooking, meeting their essential desire to find out how close they can get their food to the fire before it is covered in flames!
    Umm... Maybe just keep an eye on the kiddos after all...

    1 lb Bacon (no sugars added, approximately 12 total slices) 24 Brussels Sprouts
    1. Trim and wash the brussels sprouts.
     

    2. Cut the pound of bacon in half so that you have 24 shorter slices.

    3. Wrap the bacon around the brussels sprouts so that both ends of the bacon overlap. Skewer them on a sharpened stick or roasting fork so that the ends of the bacon are secured.

    4. Hold the bacon-wrapped brussels sprouts over the flames or coals until the bacon is crispy and appetizing.


    5. Eat plain, or with a splash of lemon, sugarless barbecue sauce, or mustard.



      Campfire Spinach and Artichoke Dip
    A super-tasty appetizer you can prepare before you leave to camp and throw on the coals as soon as they are ready.

    8 ounces sour cream 8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature 1 cup shredded paremesan cheese, fresh 3/4 cup cooked spinach, chopped 1 cup artichoke hearts, chopped 1/2 tsp garlic powder salt to taste Bacon Chips 1 lb bacon without sugar, more as needed
    Mix all of the ingredients together in a bowl. Salt to taste. Divide the mixture in half.

    Layer two pieces of heavy-duty aluminum foil on a counter and place half the mixture in the center of the foil. Fold the edges up and over the mixture, folding the edges over each other to create a tight seal with the mixture enclosed within.

    Repeat the last step with the other half of the mixture so that you have two foil packets of dip.

    Store in the refrigerator or a cooler for four hours to allow the flavors to mingle.

    Place the packets near hot coals when they are ready. Cook for 20 minutes.

    Remove the foil packs and check that the mixture is hot and soft. Enjoy with sliced vegetables or bacon chips.

    (To make the dip at home, bake the foil packets in your oven at 425F for 20 minutes.)
    Bacon Chips (optional) Line a sided cookie sheet with parchment paper.


    Cut bacon strips into 2" long segments.

    Lay the bacon segments out on the lined cookie sheet so they are close together but do not touch. 


    Put the cookie sheet into a cold oven and turn it on to 400F.

    Bake for 12 minutes. Remove the pan and flip the bacon pieces. Bake 8-10 minutes more, or until desired crispiness level is achieved.

    Remove from pan immediately and allow to cool. Store in an airtight container.





      LCHF Cabbage and Sausage Foil Dinners
    "Hobo Dinners," "Campfire Dinners," "Foil Dinners." No matter what you called them growing up, they were a staple campfire meal on most campouts. Here's a potato-free version that relies on radishes to maintain the "feel" of this old favorite. Don't worry, though; baking the radishes cuts back on their s

    • 33 Min.
    Episode 33: Mastering the Meat Counter

    Episode 33: Mastering the Meat Counter

    033: Mastering the Meat Counter. Released: May 3, 2018
    Adam and Anne chat about the new documentary about low-carb, high fat diets that Vinnie Tortorich will be crowdsourcing. To stay up to date on information about its progress, text NSNG to 228-28. Adam was a butcher for a few years and shares what he knows about various cuts of meat and how to make sure you're getting the best you can afford. This episode is jam packed with information for those of you (like Anne) who have always felt less than prepared to pick the best meats. When picking steaks, you want to look for the whitish lines and specks inside the muscle tissue. This is called "marbling" and is actually fat inside the muscle. The more fat, the more tender and flavorful the steak will be. The bone in a T-bone steak is actually a vertebrea shaped like a plus sign that has been cut in half vertically. As you pick a T-bone steak, think of the meat on either side of the bone as forming two quadrants. The larger quadrant is the steak that is often sold alone as a New York Strip. The smaller steak is the tenderloin, a gently used muscle in the cow that is known for its tender texture and rich flavor. You want to choose T-bones with larger tenderloin sections to get the most quality for your dollar. Porterhouse steaks are T-bone steaks with larger tenderloin sections. Steaks tend to come from the cow's back, where the muscles aren't so vigorously used, which makes them more tender. The muscles of the rump and legs are used more by the animal and the meat is, therefore, tougher, stringier, and less fatty. However, the meat also tends to be more flavorful. Meat from these areas of the cow need to be cooked longer on a lower heat to result in a more tender outcome. Examples of these cuts are brisket, rump, chuck, bottom round, top round, and tri-tip. White "marbling" in these cuts indicate connective tissue rather than fat content. Again, not necessarily a bad thing, just a sign that the meat needs to be cooked slowly. When in doubt, ribeye is the most flavorful and most fogiving cut to cook because of its high fat content. Look for ones with the most marbling in the meat for the best results. In the US, beef is labeled as Prime, which you will generally only find in restaurants and specialty butcher shops, Choice, and Select. Any other labels added to the meat are simply marketing. When in doubt, ask the butcher, and he should answer Prime, Choice, or Select. You can also judge for yourself by looking at the amount of marbling in the meat and learning overtime what level of marblins is acceptable to your tastebuds and pocketbook. All steaks, before they are cut into steaks, exist as roasts. Any cut thicker than 1.5" is technically a roast. Larger roasts, even of tender meats, need to be cooked low and sloe so they don't dry out or to help the meat soften. Don't feel shy about talking to your butcher! They can custom grind ground meat to your specifications, order specific cuts, or chop roasts into steaks or other cuts for you. Keep in mind that because their cutting gear needs to be cleaned when they switch from one type of meat to another, you may need to pick up a special request later in the day. If you can see the bone of the steak or roast and it looks pourous and brittle, that means the animal was older. This is a rare occurance in the US, and it not necessarily a bad thing. The meat may be tougher, but should be more flavorful, as well. So opt to cook it low and slow. When looking at the fat in the meat, a yellowish tinge means it was grass-fed. White fat meants it was grain fed, or grass fed at first and then finished with grain. Americans tend to prefer the look of white fat, though grass-fed animals tend to be healthier for you and taste better, too. Beef is aged under certain temperature and humidity conditions that are nearly impossible to duplicate at home

    • 38 Min.

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