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The LJS Podcast is the podcast where you get weekly jazz tips, interviews, stories and advice for becoming a better jazz musician! Hosting the show is the jazz musician behind learnjazzstandards.com, author, and entrepreneur Brent Vaartstra, whose one goal is to answer any question about playing jazz music you may have. Jazz can be a challenging music to learn and play, but it doesn't have to be so hard. Each episode features a specific musical challenge that jazz students may come across, where it is discussed and answered. Special jazz guests frequent the show, sharing their expertise on an array of different musical subject matter. Join thousands of listeners getting free jazz education every week!

Learn Jazz Standards Podcast Brent Vaartstra: Jazz Musician, Author, and Entrepreneur

    • Musikrezensionen
    • 5.0, 4 Bewertungen

The LJS Podcast is the podcast where you get weekly jazz tips, interviews, stories and advice for becoming a better jazz musician! Hosting the show is the jazz musician behind learnjazzstandards.com, author, and entrepreneur Brent Vaartstra, whose one goal is to answer any question about playing jazz music you may have. Jazz can be a challenging music to learn and play, but it doesn't have to be so hard. Each episode features a specific musical challenge that jazz students may come across, where it is discussed and answered. Special jazz guests frequent the show, sharing their expertise on an array of different musical subject matter. Join thousands of listeners getting free jazz education every week!

    LJS 230: 3 Steps to Playing Licks Organically in Your Jazz Improv

    LJS 230: 3 Steps to Playing Licks Organically in Your Jazz Improv

    Welcome to episode 230 of the LJS Podcast where today I go over my 3 step LIT Process for learning and applying jazz licks. Learning licks and then copy/pasting them into your solos rarerly sounds natural, so we need to learn and apply them in a way that allows them to come out organically and expressed our own way.







    Listen to episode 230















    I've got a question for you.







    Have you ever learned a jazz lick, maybe off of a record, or from some other resource? You were really excited about it, practiced it, it's a great new idea that you can use in your jazz improv. 







    But when it finally came to actually applying it, maybe at a jam session or gig or just by yourself in a practice jam session, you weren't really able to do it very well. 







    It just sort of sounded contrived, you're basically copying and pasting it, maybe you couldn't really time it right, couldn't really fit it into what you are trying to do. It just didn't sound very good and you sort of felt like, oh, that went to waste!







    Well, we don't really want to be using licks that way. Yes, we want to learn them, we want to learn new jazz language. But how do we actually play licks and learn licks so they come out organically in our solos?







    That's exactly what we are going to talk about in today's episode. I'm going to teach you my LIT process for learning and applying licks in your jazz improv. 







    In this episode:







    1. Learn







    2. Internalize







    3. Transform







    Important Links







    1. LJS Inner Circle Membership

    • 12 Min.
    LJS 229: How to Turn Scales Into Killer Jazz Solos

    LJS 229: How to Turn Scales Into Killer Jazz Solos

    Welcome to episode 229 of the LJS Podcast where today I have on special guest Brett Pontecorvo to teach us how to properly use scales to build great solos. Scales are useful tools, but if applied in an un-musical way, can be problematic. Brett walks us through some solid tips for taking vanilla scales and developing them into melodic masterpieces.







    Listen to episode 229















    Scales are a classic way to get started with improvising over a jazz standard and they can be quite useful. 







    However, in the wrong hands and used the wrong way, they just end up sounding like scales. Very unmusical, very vanilla, and it just sort of sounds like you are playing notes overtop of jazz standards.







    And that's not really what we want. We want to play actual music, actual melodies. 







    So the real big question here is how do we make scales musical?







    How do we take something that is a linear pattern and turn it into something that actually has great melodic value, yet still helps you identify notes and get ideas and sounds in your head that you can use in your jazz improv?







    Well, on today's show, I have very special guest Brett Pontecorvo, who is my music production manager at Learn Jazz Standards, a phenomenal pianist and educator. He is going to teach us exactly how to take scales and make them musical so that you can play killer jazz solos with them.







    In this episode:







    1. How to choose which scales to play over chords







    2. Mapping scales to connect them together







    3. Using rhythms as a starting point







    4. Intervals and leaps to begin developing melody







    5. How chromaticism can help emphasize important scale tones







    Important Links





    1. LJS Inner Circle Membership

    2. Brett's LiveKeyboardist.com https://livekeyboardist.com/

    • 42 Min.
    LJS 228: How to Play “Outside” and Sound Good

    LJS 228: How to Play “Outside” and Sound Good

    Welcome to episode 228 of the LJS Podcast where today I teach you a few principles and techniques that will help you play "outside" of the changes without it sounding avante garde or playing wrong notes. I use a lick from an etude in our Inner Circle membership as an example.







    Listen to episode 228















    Have you ever listened to a jazz recording and suddenly the soloist that you're listening to starts going outside of the changes like it sounds dissonant, it doesn't sound completely stable, feels unstable, and feels a little shaky. 







    But then all of a sudden they brilliantly resolve it back into the key center again and everything sounds like it came home and it sounds great and they end up sounding like a genius, right? You're like, wow, how do they do that?







    And sometimes we might want to start going outside of the "changes" so that we can create some different colors, some different sounds, and then resolve back to where we want to be in the diatonic changes.







    So, in today's episode, I'm going to be going over some ways to do that by looking at a particular lick that goes through this exact idea of playing outside the changes and then resolving back into the harmony again and see what lessons we can learn from that and take away from it.







    In this episode:







    1. When going out, remember that you need to come back in







    2. Use repeated patterns







    3. Use melodic direction towards resolutions















    Important Links







    1. LJS Inner Circle Membership

    • 25 Min.
    LJS 227: 3 Practice Habits for Retaining Musical Material

    LJS 227: 3 Practice Habits for Retaining Musical Material

    Welcome to episode 227 of the LJS Podcast where today we cover 3 practice habits for retaining musical material. It can be frustrating when you learn a jazz standard, solo, or lick, only to forget it later. In this episode, I introduce some practice habits that can be helpful for long term retention and set you up for success.







    Listen to episode 227















    It can be tough when we are learning a new jazz language, new jazz standards, to retain all of the information that we are learning. 







    I mean, there is so much out there that we are learning. We're learning licks. We're learning jazz standards. We're learning melodies. We're learning chord changes to multiple different things.







    And eventually, we could possibly forget all of those things and it would feel like a lot of hard work has been wasted. But we don't want any of that to happen. 







    So, what are some of the best practices that we can put into place in order to retain the information that we are learning so that we can get out there and play the best music we possibly can?







    Well, that's exactly what we are going to talk about in today's episode. Three different practice habits that I want you to adapt in order to be able to retain information better. 







    In this episode:







    1. Consistency (different from repetition)







    2. Limiting Material (not overloading)







    3. Breaks (to allow your subconscious to absorb information)







    Important Links







    1. LJS 181: I'm Taking a Break from Jazz







    2. LJS Inner Circle Membership

    • 16 Min.
    LJS 226: How to End a Jazz Standard

    LJS 226: How to End a Jazz Standard

    Welcome to episode 226 of the LJS Podcast where today we cover the very important topic of ending jazz standards. Ever come to the end of jamming on a standard only for things to fall apart at the end? We all need some stock endings in our arsenal, and in today's episode, I go over 7 different endings you can use to conclude jazz standards.







    Listen to episode 226















    When playing jazz standards, it's important to have a number of stock endings that you already know, that you've already planned out, so you have some options when you're trying to end a jazz standard and so you can avoid the awkward in not really knowing how to end a song situation.







    So in today's episode, I will be going over 7 different endings for jazz standards. 







    In this episode:







    1. Take the A Train Ending







    2. Count Basie Ending







    3. Ritardando Ending







    4. bIImaj7 Ending







    5. Altered I Chord Ending







    6. ii-IV-iii-VI Tag Ending







    7. b5 Chromatic Descending Ending









    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFGZsW29GAg









    Important Links







    1. LJS 179: Intros to Play on Jazz Standards







    2. LJS Inner Circle Membership

    LJS 225: When to Stop Practicing Something and Move On

    LJS 225: When to Stop Practicing Something and Move On

    Welcome to episode 225 of the LJS Podcast where today I answer a question that I get asked quite often: when do I stop practicing something I'm working on and move on to something else? Often we get overly concerned about mastery and perfection, which can lead to getting stuck. Learn when you know something "good enough" and why you may want to move on even if things aren't perfect.







    Listen to episode 225















    There's that famous Winston Churchill quote that goes, "Perfection is the enemy of progress". And when it comes to playing jazz and becoming a better musician, this can't be more true in my opinion. 







    When we get stuck trying to "master things", we don't move on to the next lesson that we need to learn. We get stuck in one place, we over-obsess over something. We're not allowing ourselves to learn all of the multitudes of things that could be learned and refined when we move on to other material.







    But at the same time, how do we know when we've learned something well enough? We don't want to move on to the next thing if we really haven't gotten any control over a particular musical concept.







    So, in today's episode, I'm going to dive in deep with that. I want to help us answer this question: how do we know when to move on to the next thing in our jazz playing?







    In this episode:







    1. Why moving on is sometimes the path to quicker improvement







    2. Q1: On a scale of 1-10 how comfortable do I feel with the material?







    3. Q2: How long have you been working on this material?







    4. Q3: Does the material you are working on occur often in other jazz concepts you will work on?







    Important Links







    1. LJS Inner Circle Membership

    • 20 Min.

Kundenrezensionen

5.0 von 5
4 Bewertungen

4 Bewertungen

jezeline ,

Great content, great presentation

The podcast is a weekly highlight. Brent discusses all aspects of learning Jazz in a very positive and engaging way.

JazzStefan ,

Great Help When Learning Jazz

It's a very great help on the way to become a jazz musician. Brent totally boils it down to the top most important things to learn and practice towards improving your skills in the field.

mokkahoff ,

A great source

It's a great source's also watch out for the site which is very useful!

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