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Democracy, citizenship, and constitutionalism raise broad-ranging yet deeply interconnected concerns. It is difficult to pursue these concerns in all their rich interconnections due to academic specialization. Constitutionalism is a subject for lawyers; democratic institutions for political scientists; ethnicity, religion, and culture are for sociologists, anthropologists, and historians; the media are grist for communications specialists. This program is designed to synthesize multiple academic perspectives on these complex issues.

Current 2011-2012 Theme: Corporations and Citizens
Modern business corporations receive charters from and operate within the legal frameworks of national states. Though they organize and regulate much of the daily lives of a considerable portion of humanity, and though they impact the planet more generally, corporations are not themselves typically constituted internally around ideals such as democracy, citizenship, and egalitarianism, which are associated instead with national political culture. How did corporations as social institutions develop historically, and what role have they played in the rise of modern democratic states? What are and by right ought to be the responsibilities of corporations to their owners, to those who work for them, to the nations in which they operate, and to the planet more generally? What are the national and international roles and responsibilities of multinational corporations who, in the 21st century, often operate on a global scale — and what should they be? How have corporations affected different parts of the world, from Europe and North America, to Latin America, the Middle East, East and South Asia, and Africa? These are some of the questions we explore in the DCC program for 2011-2012.

For more information visit our website at http://www.sas.upenn.edu/dcc/events.html.

Penn Program on Democracy, Citizenship, and Constitutionalism 2011-2012 University of Pennsylvania

    • Wissenschaft

Democracy, citizenship, and constitutionalism raise broad-ranging yet deeply interconnected concerns. It is difficult to pursue these concerns in all their rich interconnections due to academic specialization. Constitutionalism is a subject for lawyers; democratic institutions for political scientists; ethnicity, religion, and culture are for sociologists, anthropologists, and historians; the media are grist for communications specialists. This program is designed to synthesize multiple academic perspectives on these complex issues.

Current 2011-2012 Theme: Corporations and Citizens
Modern business corporations receive charters from and operate within the legal frameworks of national states. Though they organize and regulate much of the daily lives of a considerable portion of humanity, and though they impact the planet more generally, corporations are not themselves typically constituted internally around ideals such as democracy, citizenship, and egalitarianism, which are associated instead with national political culture. How did corporations as social institutions develop historically, and what role have they played in the rise of modern democratic states? What are and by right ought to be the responsibilities of corporations to their owners, to those who work for them, to the nations in which they operate, and to the planet more generally? What are the national and international roles and responsibilities of multinational corporations who, in the 21st century, often operate on a global scale — and what should they be? How have corporations affected different parts of the world, from Europe and North America, to Latin America, the Middle East, East and South Asia, and Africa? These are some of the questions we explore in the DCC program for 2011-2012.

For more information visit our website at http://www.sas.upenn.edu/dcc/events.html.

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