109 Folgen

Welcome the Value Inspiration podcast. The goal I have with this podcast is two-fold:
to inspire ‘new forms of value creation’ by sharing compelling ideas and stories about the potential we can unlock when technology and people blend in the right way.Share experiences from tech-entrepreneurs like you about what it requires to create a remarkable software business and how to overcome the roadblocks to do so.
For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

Value Inspiration Podcast Ton Dobbe

    • Technologie

Welcome the Value Inspiration podcast. The goal I have with this podcast is two-fold:
to inspire ‘new forms of value creation’ by sharing compelling ideas and stories about the potential we can unlock when technology and people blend in the right way.Share experiences from tech-entrepreneurs like you about what it requires to create a remarkable software business and how to overcome the roadblocks to do so.
For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

    Creating a tailwind behind your company that makes you unstoppable

    Creating a tailwind behind your company that makes you unstoppable

    This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to grow customer trust by bridging the growing gap between the online and offline world. My guest is Gregg Johnson, CEO of Invoca.
    Gregg is a seasoned SaaS executive with a passion for building and bringing to market products in emerging categories. He led Salesforce Marketing Cloud’s social marketing product line, where he integrated $1 billion of M&A investments into the Salesforce product portfolio. Prior to that he drove product strategy and development for Salesforce Chatter, helping define the category of enterprise social networking. Earlier in his career, Gregg was a consultant at Boston Consulting Group and worked in sales, marketing and product roles at several startups. He graduated from Stanford University and holds a Master’s degree from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business.
    Gregg joined Invoca as CEO in 2017 and under his leadership, the company has experienced multiple X growth. In 2019, The Software Report ranked Gregg to be #3 on the list of Top 25 Growth Leaders. Meanwhile Invoca won multiple industry awards such as “Best Call Tracking Platform Award”, “Artificial Intelligence Excellence Award”, and the “Hot Vendor Award” in conversational intelligence.
    This triggered me, and hence I invited Gregg to my podcast. (Note: we recorded this podcast in February 2020, just as the Coronavirus pandemic was starting to sweep through Europe and North America.) We explore the growing challenge for many brands to live up to their customers’ expectations and grow trust in a world that’s increasingly digital, but where human interaction is a critical component as well. We also discuss Gregg’s experiences in successfully scaling his company while growing their ability to help their customers make a meaningful difference.
    Here are some of his quotes:
    The problem with more complex products and services is oftentimes people start the purchase journey in digital, but they end up getting consultative advice as part of the buying process.
    The problem for a marketer is: once you escalate out of the digital channel to these human to human conversational channels, typically marketers haven't been able to understand the impact of their marketing investments on that human to human conversation.
    As I like to say: if you have your best friend, and you tell them all your secrets and the things that you're really worried about in life, and then two weeks later, they show up, and they don't remember any of that information, they're probably not going to be your best friend for very long.
    So really, what we do from a technology point of view is trying to help bridge that gap between what happens in the digital world and then what happens in the conversational interactions between a consumer and the representatives of a brand.
    During this interview, you will learn four things:
    That a critical to way to look at you company is not only how you are solving a meaningful problem for your customers, but also how your customers perceive you as a company.How to accelerate momentum by smartly adjusting make, buy partner decisions based on different market conditions and where you are in your product market fit life-cycleHow to use communication as a weapon to grow alignment, motivation and trust inside your business. Mastering this will give you surprising insights and levels of engagement.That the biggest tailwind you can have is with customers that are excited about what you have done for them and their business.

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    • 46 Min.
    Using Artificial Intelligence responsibly in order to change the world for the better.

    Using Artificial Intelligence responsibly in order to change the world for the better.

    This podcast interview focuses on the need to clearly define Artificial Intelligence so we can use it to its full potential in our strides to improve the well-being of people. My guest is Prof. Dr. Dagmar Monett, Professor of Computer Science, Berlin School of Economics and Law.
    Professor Dagmar Monett has more than 30 years of research and teaching experience. She’s the co-Founder of the Artificial General Intelligence Sentinel Initiative, AGISI.org, which is "dedicated to understanding intelligence in order to build beneficial AI and risk/benefit analysis tools to monitor the social and economic consequences of AI to help improve the well-being of all humanity."
    She’s also the co-Founder of the Competence Center Digitalization at the Berlin School of Economics and Law. At this moment she’s focusing on Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, Software Engineering methods and techniques, and Computer Science education. 
    The mission behind AGISI.org is this: ‘To make giant leaps in Artificial Intelligence research in order to change the world for the better.’ That triggered me, and hence I invited Professor Monett to my podcast. We explore why it is so key to have clear definitions for Artificial Intelligence – and how that helps drive the innovation we are hoping for. 
    Here are some of her quotes:
    We were seeing that people were concerned about how defining AI is essential for bringing in the field forward, but also why we don't have a definition till now where everybody agrees upon.
    There is a lot that we unconsciously assume about defining concepts that people don't understand well. So our goal is to bring clarity and understanding in this area and specially in defining artificial intelligence. 
    We want to understand intelligence better in order to advance humanity … using intelligent algorithms, intelligent systems, intelligence programs better may be dependent on that.
    By listening to this interview, you will learn three things:
    Why you should be clear from the start how you’re using AI so that you don’t compromise ethics around security or privacyThat trust should be earned and that starts with good products, good behavior, good communication, and good interactionWhy it is important to not only have a solid understanding of AI on the development side, but equally important to have it on the business side

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    • 33 Min.
    How to turn technology into something that becomes your best companion?

    How to turn technology into something that becomes your best companion?

    This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to unlock the potential of people with physical challenges and enable them to be active in society. My guest is David Hojah, President, co-founder and CTO of Loro
    His background is in medical devices, engineering, and healthcare innovation. He is passionate about empowering people with physical challenges to live independently and making a great social impact.
    David has invented and developed many medical devices, such as adjustable dental instruments, wheelchairs that convert into a walker, a medical drone for emergencies, and a medical app tracking health for people with chronic diseases. He also built an autonomous personal transporter for wheelchair users that can convert any manual wheelchair into an electric wheelchair.
    Loro is David's third company. He has received awards, nomination, and news coverage from organizations including MIT, Harvard University, MIT Hacking Medicine, ALSA, Harvard Innovation Lab, Fit4Start in Luxembourg, Microsoft Imagine Cup, and TechCrunch.
    Loro is an AI-powered smart, personalized companion for wheelchair users to navigate safely and to communicate efficiently. A person with physical challenges can’t interact with the world the same way as the able, but there’s no reason we can’t use tech to close that gap. 
    That inspired me, and hence I invited David to my podcast. We explore the challenges of creating solutions that are life changing – what mindset do you need, what’s the secret sauce to such approach, how do you make critical decisions, how to make tangible progress and create something remarkable. 
    Here are some of his quotes:
    I got inspired by Stephen Hawking. He inspired me both personally and professionally. I do believe there are many people like Stephen Hawking out there. They're just missing accessible technology to be the next Hawking. To be the next engineer, designer, whatever they want to be.
    They're brilliant, they're intelligent, they're very, very smart, but the only problem: they're stuck in their body, they cannot move their body, they cannot talk. Their mind is like, with the whole universe, they can do many things. The only challenge is; if we unlock their potential, so they can talk, they can communicate first, then they can do many things with their ability.
    Then we can move on to another level: How to make them more independent. How to make them more engaged and help them to be employed.
    We want those people to be active in society. To be engaged. To do more, not just for them, but for everyone.

    During this interview, you will learn three things:
    That there’s no lack of good ideas – what separates you in doing something remarkable is in turning these ideas into solutions that matter.Why it’s critical to get crystal clear on the real problem and what’s it value proposition. If you don’t get this right you won’t survive for long.How to remove bias – ways to seek the truth – finding out what’s right and what’s wrong. Doing your homework here paves the path for your success.

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    • 33 Min.
    The compounding effect as to how we can keep getting better incrementally every day

    The compounding effect as to how we can keep getting better incrementally every day

    This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to amplify the impact humans can make by a factor 10. My guest is Ajeet Kushwaha, Co-founder and CTO/CPO of Seekify
    Ajeet is a serial entrepreneur but started his career as a software engineer. In 2010 he co-founded his first company HealthChakra.com, a saas based practice management platform for doctors. In 2011 he cofounded HealthKart, and in 2012 1MG. In 2015 he built ‘Joe Hukum’, a chatbot SaaS platform, that was acquired by Freshworks in 2017 where he then became the Director of Product Management. 
    In the middle of 2019 he then founded Seekify - a Customer Experience Automation Platform, helps businesses deliver wow customer experience by automating it without losing the human touch. 
    And this triggered me, hence I invited Ajeet to my podcast. We explore the opportunity we have to enable humans to 10x the impact they can make if we go beyond the notion of just ‘automation’. We also discuss Ajeet’s perspective on what it takes to create a remarkable software business.
    I personally believe in the compounding effect as to how we can keep getting better incrementally every day. I believe very fundamentally that a healthy competition is always when you compete with yourself and not to the world, because then you have the possibility to the best in the world
    While working at Freshbooks (a business software company), we realized that how only automation or how only human intervention cannot lead to a better experience. All these things needs to operate in tandem, hand in hand.
    That thought led to the case: Can we bring something in this in the scene where we empower these customer facing teams to deliver a better customer experience by bringing automation together. Can we create an intersection of these and make sure that automation is enabling, augmenting human in a way, that they can deliver the customer experience, which a customer really is looking for.
    During this interview, you will learn three things:
    That too often our solutions are reactive to how people want them to work. But what if we make them much more like a GPS – with self-healing characteristics based on what’s actually happeningHow momentum is created by being very picky about selecting your customersWhy the biggest impact is made when you take the mindset that every problem comes with a solution. It’s that determination that helps us win the biggest battles. 

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    • 35 Min.
    What it takes to accelerate sales in today’s B2B market

    What it takes to accelerate sales in today’s B2B market

    This podcast interview focuses on the big idea behind Cognism, a sales acceleration platform, and the lessons tech-entrepreneur James Isilay learned on his journey of delivering remarkable impact with his business.
    James Isilay is the co-founder and CEO of Cognism, one of the fastest-growing SaaS companies in the UK. Last year, Cognism grew from $2.5M to $7M in ARR and was voted by LinkedIn as one of the UK’s Top 25 Startups. He’s an inspirational and enterprising businessman, who approaches work with unrivalled technical and organisational skills, perseverance, precision and total dedication.
     
    Before founding Cognism, James was employed as an Algorithmic Trader at Axpo Group and as a Quantitative/Technical Analyst at EGL Trading. James has a Masters in Engineering in Information Systems Engineering from Imperial College London.
     
    He is an expert in lead generation, sales management and alpha discovery using algorithmic technologies, natural language processing and machine learning.
    What triggered me to invite James to my podcast is their story to accelerate sales by enriching prospect data with critical event data. We explore what’s broken in B2B sales and the new ways to solve the problem. We explore the lessons learned by James starting and scaling his tech-start-up, and what decisions helped him to realize the impact they’re creating today. 
    Here are some of his quotes:
    The biggest thing that causes failure in a lot of companies is just poor sales process and bad sales process.
    Sales is actually your first problem as a CEO that you need to address and get right.
    And then, when you got that right, then you've got time to get your other bits right. But if you get sales wrong, you don't really have much of a chance.
    People waste a lot of people time pulling leads off LinkedIn, putting them through several tools to build a data set that then is not very highly responsive to outreach. So you waste, you burn time across the whole process.
    Whereas, if you can just get that list built correctly and efficiently and then engage that list in an effective sales cadence and get a high response, then you're saving time across every aspect and you're getting a better outcome on the actual new business that you're generating. That's pretty much the majority of the battle.
    During this interview, you will learn three things:
    Why it’s important to not only solve a highly valuable problem, but also pay attention to how urgent/critical this is to your ideal customer. Why, the moment you have success, you need to continuously keep thinking about how you upgrade ‘the system’ – nothing is staticHow to go about collecting feedback – and why it’s key to get that from real customers, those who are completely neutral and honest to tell you what works…and what sucks.

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    • 32 Min.
    Technically Right, Effectively Wrong: Why 85% Data Science Projects Fail

    Technically Right, Effectively Wrong: Why 85% Data Science Projects Fail

    This podcast interview focuses on a key aspect to drive product innovation and that is mastering human centered design. My guest is Brian T. O’Neill, founder and principal of Designing for Analytics.
    Brian T. O'Neill is a designer, advisor, and founder of Designing for Analytics, an independent consultancy which helps organizations design innovate innovative products powered by data science and analytics. For over 20 years, he has worked with companies including DellEMC, Global Strategy Group, Tripadvisor, Fidelity, JP Morgan Chase, ETrade and several SAAS startups. He has spoken internationally, giving talks at O'Reilly Strata, Enterprise Data World, the International Institute for Analytics Symposium, Predictive Analytics World, and Boston College. Brian also hosts the 5-star podcast, Experiencing Data, where he reveals the strategies and activities that product, data science and analytics leaders are using to deliver valuable experiences around data. In addition to consulting, Brian is also a professional percussionist and has performed at Carnegie Hall and The Kennedy Center. 
    What triggered me to invite Brian to my podcast was one of his quotes about the fact that 85% of AI, analytics, and big data projects fail. That’s why we explore why this is the case, and what needs to be done different in order to be successful – creating software products that people find worth making a remark about. 
    Here are some of his quotes:
    I started to see really, really bad survey results over 10 plus years. What I'm specifically talking about here is the success rate for delivering data projects.
    The theme here is the success rate on launching successful data initiatives hovered around 10 to 25%. So that means there’s failure rates up in the 75% plus.
    My general feeling was: There's a lack of a focus on the human aspect of analytics and data science projects and products right now. We're trying to use the data science and analytics hammer, and we're looking for stuff to hit. But no one's really aware why do we need holes? Who needs a hole? And where do they need the hole? Instead, it's just hit nails wherever we can and hope that someone maybe needs a hole there.
    During this interview, you will learn three things:
    That a first step in succeeding data projects is to stop forgetting about the value of fun and engaging with people.Why it is key to define the owner of value creation in your team – i.e. someone that owns the problem and the accountability for analytics and data science solutions to product value.That we have lost the humanity aspect in solution design – and a way to fix that and get some real wins is to spend time developing soft skills

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    • 40 Min.

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