100 episodes

This collection of programs from the University of California faculty and guests illuminates the crosscurrents in America that led to the election of Donald Trump and the ensuing impact on healthcare, immigration, foreign policy, human rights, journalism, Congress, the courts and other institutions in civic life.

American Politics (Video) UCTV

    • News

This collection of programs from the University of California faculty and guests illuminates the crosscurrents in America that led to the election of Donald Trump and the ensuing impact on healthcare, immigration, foreign policy, human rights, journalism, Congress, the courts and other institutions in civic life.

    • video
    An Election Like No Other: Ensuring Democracy’s Survival

    An Election Like No Other: Ensuring Democracy’s Survival

    This panel features leaders and experts addressing these unprecedented times and all the challenges confronting Election 2020. What can we do to make voters' voices heard during an unprecedented pandemic and a historic civil rights uprising? Panelists: Aimee Allison, She the People; Betrall Ross, Berkeley Law; James Schwab, Chief Deputy Secretary of State, California; Dr. John Swartzberg, UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health. Moderator: Dan Lindheim, Center on Civility and Democratic Engagement at the Goldman School of Public Policy. Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 36509]

    • 1 hr 6 min
    • video
    Voting Rights and Voter Suppression - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    Voting Rights and Voter Suppression - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    This lecture kicks off with Professor Jayaraman’s discussion of “astroturf” social movements and the growing battle around California’s Ballot Propositions 15 and 22. These propositions represent two attempts of billionaires to privatize the public-school system in California and to re-write the state’s labor laws to impose “independent contractor” status upon millions of gig workers. From there Professor Cohen takes up the main topic of voting rights and the long history of voter suppression in the United States with particular emphasis upon the Trump administration’s efforts to suppress voter turnout and challenge the election results after November 3. Remember, if your vote didn’t matter, they wouldn’t try so hard to suppress it. So if you have not already, go and vote early, especially in those down ballot races that really matter.
    Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 36513]

    • 1 hr 36 min
    • video
    American Democracy: Needed Reforms

    American Democracy: Needed Reforms

    Many observers believe we need to grapple with challenges arising from the many well-established laws, regulations and policies which have been ignored or violated over the past four years. Goldman School of Public Policy faculty and former UC President and former Secretary for Homeland Security Janet Napolitano, with Leon Panetta, L. Song Richardson and Eric Swalwell explore the norms, assumptions, and governmental practices that have changed during the Trump presidency and the ensuing impact on American society and democracy. Can we make our democracy stronger and better? What would a practical, yet ambitious, roadmap for reform look like? Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 36471]

    • 1 hr 28 min
    • video
    Ruth Bader Ginsberg and the Election - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    Ruth Bader Ginsberg and the Election - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    Today we explore the life and legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the consequences her death may have for election 2020. The sudden death of the 87 year old jurist and feminist icon has not only disrupted the already unprecedented election season, but it has raised the stakes for the Presidency, the Senate and the future of the Supreme Court going forward. In this discussion we try to illuminate the partisan politics behind seeking her replacement, the constituencies most committed to replacing Ginsberg as well as those most threatened by this right wing shift in the Court, while holding up the possibility of future resistance and the need to mobilize in the defense of democracy. Join us as we attempt to displace despair with hope and replace anxiety with analysis in this moment of crisis. Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 36279]

    • 1 hr 37 min
    • video
    Racial Classification and the 2020 Census with Michael Omi - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    Racial Classification and the 2020 Census with Michael Omi - Election 2020: UC Berkeley Big Ideas

    Today we take up the question of racial classification and the 2020 census with professor Michael Omi. Professor Omi is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies, Asians American and Asian Diaspora Studies at UC Berkeley. He is the author, along with Howard Winant, of the ground breaking work Racial Formations in the United States, now in its third edition. At Berkeley, Professor Omi serves as the Associate Director of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, and is an affiliated faculty member of Sociology and Gender & Women’s Studies. In today’s talk, Professor Omi uses racial formations theory to discuss his research into the United States census and its evolving system of classifying and categorizing race. Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 36278]

    • 1 hr 47 min
    • video
    Big Ideas: Election 2020: Race Space and Politics

    Big Ideas: Election 2020: Race Space and Politics

    The principle question for this presentation is what is “race” and how does it shape our politics? We begin with an introduction looking at the ongoing western wildfires, its differential impact upon white versus communities of color and the prison workers who get paid pennies a day to fight wildfires in California. From there we turn to a consideration of race and racism as defined by sociologists Michael Omi and Howard Winant. Together, they define race as “a concept which signifies and symbolizes social conflicts and interests by referring to different types of human bodies.” Using this definition, we consider a range of examples of how racial categories and racial formations are “created, inhabited, transformed and destroyed.” We begin with the 1790 Naturalization act which reserved the rights of citizenship to “free white persons.” Then move on to consider how racial categories have both fixed our identities and shifted our history from Columbus to the 2020 Census.

    Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 36277]

    • 1 hr 47 min

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