62 episodes

Banter is AEI’s weekly podcast series, where hosts Matt Winesett, Max Frost, and Max Towey interview leading thinkers and political commentators on a wide range of policy topics. True to its name, Banter keeps the conversation fun, entertaining, and interesting for anyone with an interest politics and policy.

Banter: An AEI Podcast American Enterprise Institute

    • Politics

Banter is AEI’s weekly podcast series, where hosts Matt Winesett, Max Frost, and Max Towey interview leading thinkers and political commentators on a wide range of policy topics. True to its name, Banter keeps the conversation fun, entertaining, and interesting for anyone with an interest politics and policy.

    AEI President Robert Doar on America’s response to the coronavirus

    AEI President Robert Doar on America’s response to the coronavirus

    In times of national crisis, how do American institutions respond? AEI President Robert Doar joined Banter this week to discuss the work AEI is doing in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, and draw on his own experience serving in New York’s government in the years following the attacks of September 11.







    Robert Doar is the president and Morgridge Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. He joined AEI in 2014 to create a new body of work on poverty studies, after serving for more than 20 years in leadership positions in the social service programs of New York State and New York City under Gov. George Pataki and Mayor Michael Bloomberg. AEI’s poverty studies program and the scholars in it have since become leading voices in the national discussion on the importance of work, family, and personal responsibility in human flourishing.







    You can subscribe to Banter on iTunes, Stitcher, or Spotify, and archived episodes can be found at www.aei.org/tag/aei-banter. This is Banter episode #404.







    Related links:







    AEI’s COVID-19 tracker

    • 30 min
    What’s next for the reform conservatives? Yuval Levin on the future of the American right

    What’s next for the reform conservatives? Yuval Levin on the future of the American right

    During the later years of the George W. Bush administration and throughout the presidency of Barack Obama, a group that came to be known as “reformocons” began arguing that the Right needed to update its policy agenda; formulated to address the circumstances of the late 1970s, it had since gradually hardened into a set of dogmatic slogans. Family, community, traditional religion, civil society, and civic republicanism needed protection and support, they argued. But taking these social concerns seriously did not mean abandoning the Right’s affinity for market economics; it meant putting that affinity to use in the service of empowering working families.







    What has come of this agenda? How does the presidency of Donald Trump relate to it? And will reform conservatism be a force in the future? To discuss these questions and more, we were joined by Dr. Yuval Levin.







    Yuval Levin is the director of Social, Cultural, and Constitutional Studies at AEI. The founding and current editor of National Affairs, he is also a senior editor of The New Atlantis and a contributing editor to National Review. Dr. Levin served as a member of the White House domestic policy staff under President George W. Bush. He is the author of several books on political theory and public policy, most recently “A Time to Build: From Family and Community to Congress and the Campus, How Recommitting to Our Institutions Can Revive the American Dream.”







    You can subscribe to Banter on iTunes, Stitcher, or Spotify, and archived episodes can be found at www.aei.org/tag/aei-banter. This is Banter episode #403.







    Related links:







    The next coalition of the right







    “The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the Birth of Right and Left”







    “The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World”







    Taxes, poverty, and equality

    • 30 min
    Super Tuesday special: Matthew Continetti on Biden, Bernie, and the future of the Democratic Party

    Super Tuesday special: Matthew Continetti on Biden, Bernie, and the future of the Democratic Party

    Just weeks after political pundits left Joe Biden’s campaign for dead, he stormed back on Super Tuesday and reclaimed his status as the Democratic primary’s frontrunner. What caused this resurgence? And what does it mean for the Democratic Party? Matt Continetti joined the show to discuss what it means for Bernie, whether socialism is still the future for the Democratic Party, why Elizabeth Warren could never catch on, and much more.







    Matthew Continetti is a resident fellow at AEI, where his work is focused on American political thought and history, with a particular focus on the development of the Republican Party and the American conservative movement in the 20th century. A prominent journalist, analyst, author, and intellectual historian of the right, Continetti was the founding editor and the editor-in-chief of The Washington Free Beacon. He is also a contributing editor at National Review and a columnist for Commentary Magazine, and appears frequently on Fox News Channel’s “Special Report” with Bret Baier and MSNBC’s “Meet the Press Daily” with Chuck Todd.







    You can subscribe to Banter on iTunes, Stitcher, or Spotify, and archived episodes can be found at www.aei.org/tag/aei-banter. This is Banter episode #402.

    • 36 min
    ‘The New Class War’: Michael Lind on the growing divide in US politics

    ‘The New Class War’: Michael Lind on the growing divide in US politics

    The major fault line in American politics, argues Michael Lind, isn’t Republican vs. Democrat: It is the managerial overclass — the university-credentialed elite that clusters in high-income hubs and dominates government, the economy, and the culture — vs. the working class of the low-density heartlands. The two classes clash over immigration, trade, social values, and a range of other issues, and the constant triumphs of the numerically-smaller overclass are the primary source of political tension today.







    To break down this conflict, and discuss how to solve it, we interviewed Michael Lind, author of “The New Class War: Saving Democracy from the Managerial Elite.” Lind is the author of more than a dozen books of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, including “The Next American Nation” and “Land of Promise.” He has been an editor or staff writer for The New Yorker, Harper’s, The New Republic, and The National Interest. He has taught at Harvard and Johns Hopkins and is currently a professor of practice at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin.







    You can subscribe to Banter on iTunes, Stitcher, or Spotify, and archived episodes can be found at www.aei.org/tag/aei-banter. This is Banter episode #401.

    • 40 min
    Governor Jeb Bush on education, immigration, and what he’s learned from his career in politics

    Governor Jeb Bush on education, immigration, and what he’s learned from his career in politics

    For Banter’s 400th episode, Governor Jeb Bush joined the show to discuss his time in politics and what he views as the biggest challenges facing the United States. We discuss two issues near and dear to his heart — immigration and education policy — as well as what shaped his own political beliefs, how the GOP can broaden its appeal to younger voters, who he thinks will win the Super Bowl, and much more.







    Governor Bush served as governor of Florida from 1998–2006, becoming the first Republican ever to be re-elected to that post. He is the son of President George H. W. Bush and the brother of President George W. Bush.







    You can subscribe to Banter on iTunes, Stitcher, or Spotify, and archived episodes can be found at www.aei.org/tag/aei-banter. This is Banter episode #400.

    • 30 min
    Anthony Scaramucci on the Democratic field, his relationship with President Trump, and experience as an outsider in DC

    Anthony Scaramucci on the Democratic field, his relationship with President Trump, and experience as an outsider in DC

    Anthony Scaramucci joined Banter to discuss the Democratic field of presidential candidates, his journey from President Trump’s inner circle to fierce critic, the future of the Republican Party, and what it’s like being an outsider in Washington, DC.







    Anthony Scaramucci, or “The Mooch,” is the founder of investment firm SkyBridge Capital and former White House Communications Director for President Trump. His time as Communications Director, however, was short-lived; he was fired after just 11 days. Scaramucci continues to run SkyBridge Capital today, while also serving as a regular contributor to CNN and other prominent media outlets. A native of Long Island, New York, The Mooch received a B.A. in economics from Tufts University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.







    You can subscribe to “Banter” on iTunes, Stitcher, or Spotify, and archived episodes can be found at www.aei.org/tag/aei-banter. This is Banter episode #399.

    • 43 min

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