4 episodes

Thank you to the guests who volunteered their time for this podcast, which was recorded by students from Swinburne University of Technology’s Diploma of Screen and Media – Sports Media. It forms part of Swinburne’s work preventing family violence.


You’ll hear these guests talking about gender stereotypes. You might be wondering – what’s the link between gender stereotypes and family violence? Well, rigid gender roles – people not being free to be what they want to be – is one of the drivers of family violence. If we can fix this, we can reduce the likelihood of family violence occurring.


We encourage you to share this series, and for the teachers out there, to freely use it as a teaching tool to promote positive gender relationships.


If you’d like to learn more about family violence and how to help prevent it, visit www.ourwatch.org.au


If this podcast has raised any issues for you or you need support, please contact one of these support services:


1800 RESPECT: 1800 737 732, www.1800respect.org.au


1800 RESPECT operates 24 hours a day to support people impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence and abuse.


Men’s Referral Service: 1300 766 491, www.ntv.org.au


The Men’s Referral Service is operated by No to Violence and provides advice for men about family violence.


Relationships Australia: 1300 364 277, www.relationships.org.au


Relationships Australia aims to support people in Australia to achieve positive and respectful relationships.


Lifeline: 13 11 14, www.lifeline.org.au


Lifeline provides 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention services.


Kids Helpline: 1800 551 800, www.kidshelp.com.au


Kids Helpline provides a free, confidential 24/7 online and phone counselling service for young people aged 5 to 25.


This podcast series is part of the Prevention Activity in Tertiary Education Settings project – TAFE, funded by the Victorian Government.


Recorded and produced on Wurundjeri land.


Music credits: Good Times by Scott Holmes Music is licensed under an Attribution-Non Commercial 4.0 International License. https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes/carefree-music-2020/good-times

Be What You Want To Be‪!‬ bewhatyouwanttobe

    • Self-Improvement
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Thank you to the guests who volunteered their time for this podcast, which was recorded by students from Swinburne University of Technology’s Diploma of Screen and Media – Sports Media. It forms part of Swinburne’s work preventing family violence.


You’ll hear these guests talking about gender stereotypes. You might be wondering – what’s the link between gender stereotypes and family violence? Well, rigid gender roles – people not being free to be what they want to be – is one of the drivers of family violence. If we can fix this, we can reduce the likelihood of family violence occurring.


We encourage you to share this series, and for the teachers out there, to freely use it as a teaching tool to promote positive gender relationships.


If you’d like to learn more about family violence and how to help prevent it, visit www.ourwatch.org.au


If this podcast has raised any issues for you or you need support, please contact one of these support services:


1800 RESPECT: 1800 737 732, www.1800respect.org.au


1800 RESPECT operates 24 hours a day to support people impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence and abuse.


Men’s Referral Service: 1300 766 491, www.ntv.org.au


The Men’s Referral Service is operated by No to Violence and provides advice for men about family violence.


Relationships Australia: 1300 364 277, www.relationships.org.au


Relationships Australia aims to support people in Australia to achieve positive and respectful relationships.


Lifeline: 13 11 14, www.lifeline.org.au


Lifeline provides 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention services.


Kids Helpline: 1800 551 800, www.kidshelp.com.au


Kids Helpline provides a free, confidential 24/7 online and phone counselling service for young people aged 5 to 25.


This podcast series is part of the Prevention Activity in Tertiary Education Settings project – TAFE, funded by the Victorian Government.


Recorded and produced on Wurundjeri land.


Music credits: Good Times by Scott Holmes Music is licensed under an Attribution-Non Commercial 4.0 International License. https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes/carefree-music-2020/good-times

    Be a game changer

    Be a game changer

    What does it feel like to not consider yourself a male or female athlete, but instead just an athlete? One who’s there on your own merit and your own terms? 


    Hear from Australian cricket great Julia Price, Melbourne University Cricket Club Coach Emma Collard, and Richmond Football Club Education Manager Michael Chiovitti as they discuss the changing face of sport and what change is still to come. 


     


    Hosts 


    Matthew Corigliano, Thomas Esmore and Dean Andrews, Diploma of Screen and Media – Sports Media students at Swinburne University of Technology 


     


    Guests  


    Julia Price 


    Julia Price represented Australia in 94 international cricket matches between 1996 and 2005 as wicketkeeper and batter. In March 2019, she was appointed as the head coach of the United States women's cricket team and she is also a cricket commentator on Channel 7. Julia was the first female coach in the BBL when appointed assistant coach of the Brisbane Heat BBL franchise in the 2019/20 season. 


     


    Michael Chiovitti 


    As the Education Manager for the Richmond Football Club, Michael plays an active role in the design, delivery and compliance of the sport and fitness related courses at the Richmond Institute.  


    With an extensive career in athletic development, sport science and tertiary education, Michael has coached several Olympic athletes and worked with a number of male and female professional teams within the NPL, WNBL and AFL/VFL (including the Richmond Football Club). 


     


    Emma Collard 


    Emma is a lifelong lover of sports, playing at a state representative level in cricket, hockey, and rowing. Currently, she is the Melbourne University Cricket Club Women's team coach, as well as a player for the Melbourne University Women's Football Club in the VAFA Premier Division. She is incredibly passionate about seeing more representation in sport and firmly believes that greater inclusivity will lead to positive repercussions in wider society.   


     


    Thanks!


    Thank you to the guests who volunteered their time for this podcast, which was recorded by students from Swinburne University of Technology’s Diploma of Screen and Media – Sports Media. It forms part of Swinburne’s work preventing family violence. 


    You’ll hear these guests talking about gender stereotypes. You might be wondering – what’s the link between gender stereotypes and family violence? Well, rigid gender roles – people not being free to be what they want to be – is one of the drivers of family violence. If we can fix this, we can reduce the likelihood of family violence occurring. 


    We encourage you to share this series, and for the teachers out there, to freely use it as a teaching tool to promote positive gender relationships. 


    If you’d like to learn more about family violence and how to help prevent it, visit www.ourwatch.org.au 


    If this podcast has raised any issues for you or you need support, please contact one of these support services: 


    1800 RESPECT: 1800 737 732, www.1800respect.org.au 
    1800 RESPECT operates 24 hours a day to support people impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence and abuse. 


    Men’s Referral Service: 1300 766 491, www.ntv.org.au 
    The Men’s Referral Service is operated by No to Violence and provides advice for men about family violence. 


    Relationships Australia: 1300 364 277, www.relationships.org.au 
    Relationships Australia aims to support people in Australia to achieve positive and respectful relationships. 


    Lifeline: 13 11 14, www.lifeline.org.au 
    Lifeline provides 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention services. 


    Kids Helpline: 1800 551 800, www.kidshelp.com.au 
    Kids Helpline provides a free, confidential 24/7 online and phone counselling service for young people aged 5 to 25. 


    This podcast series is part of the

    • 47 min
    Be a team player

    Be a team player

    A footy club is like a big family. But when it excludes females, is it as successful as it could be? 


    Club volunteers Jack McDonald and Jacob Mumford tell us about the changes they’ve seen at their club since the introduction of a women’s team. There’s been benefits for the female players, but the inclusive culture the club has fostered has also brought benefits for the male players. 


    Listen in to hear how the club is going from strength to strength. 


     


    Hosts 


    Will Guthrie, Lachlan Robb and Sam Harvey, Diploma of Screen and Media – Sports Media students at Swinburne University of Technology 


     


    Guests 


    Jack McDonald 


    Jack is the club secretary for the Aquinas Old Collegians football club in suburban Melbourne. His encyclopaedic knowledge of the club and the game in general has earnt him the nickname ‘Stats’. 


    He discusses his role within a high performing team as they strive to make sure that their club environment is a place where everyone belongs. 


     


    Jacob Mumford 


    Jacob is the head sports trainer at Aquinas Old Collegians football club and a graduate psychiatric nurse. He was awarded the VAFA Sport Trainer of the Year award in 2019, and leads his team of trainers to ensure that the playing group has the highest possible level of care available to them throughout the season. 


     


    Thankyou


    Thank you to the guests who volunteered their time for this podcast, which was recorded by students from Swinburne University of Technology’s Diploma of Screen and Media – Sports Media. It forms part of Swinburne’s work preventing family violence. 


    You’ll hear these guests talking about gender stereotypes. You might be wondering – what’s the link between gender stereotypes and family violence? Well, rigid gender roles – people not being free to be what they want to be – is one of the drivers of family violence. If we can fix this, we can reduce the likelihood of family violence occurring. 


    We encourage you to share this series, and for the teachers out there, to freely use it as a teaching tool to promote positive gender relationships. 


    If you’d like to learn more about family violence and how to help prevent it, visit www.ourwatch.org.au 


    If this podcast has raised any issues for you or you need support, please contact one of these support services: 


    1800 RESPECT: 1800 737 732, www.1800respect.org.au 
    1800 RESPECT operates 24 hours a day to support people impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence and abuse. 


    Men’s Referral Service: 1300 766 491, www.ntv.org.au 
    The Men’s Referral Service is operated by No to Violence and provides advice for men about family violence. 


    Relationships Australia: 1300 364 277, www.relationships.org.au 
    Relationships Australia aims to support people in Australia to achieve positive and respectful relationships. 


    Lifeline: 13 11 14, www.lifeline.org.au 
    Lifeline provides 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention services. 


    Kids Helpline: 1800 551 800, www.kidshelp.com.au 
    Kids Helpline provides a free, confidential 24/7 online and phone counselling service for young people aged 5 to 25. 


    This podcast series is part of the Prevention Activity in Tertiary Education Settings project – TAFE, funded by the Victorian Government. 


    Recorded and produced on Wurundjeri land.  


    Music credits: Good Times by Scott Holmes Music is licensed under an Attribution-Non Commercial 4.0 International License. https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes/carefree-music-2020/good-times 

    • 24 min
    Be comfortable with uncomfortable

    Be comfortable with uncomfortable

    How do you deal with being uncomfortable because no one else at work is your gender? Why are the stereotypes in construction still as rigid as the things being built? How do we bring about change? 


    Join our guests from three different backgrounds as they discuss some of these challenges. 


     


    Hosts  


    Jake Riddiford, Jesse Wende and Lachlan Chugg, Diploma of Screen and Media – Sports Media students at Swinburne University of Technology 


     


    Guests 


    Jane Clancy 


    Jane is a leader in her chosen field of construction. With over 20 years’ experience in the industry, she has worked with national building industry advisory boards, employer and employee associations, and a range of businesses. She has also been at the forefront of implementing building information modelling (BIM) and mixed reality technologies at Swinburne University of Technology. 


     


    Nicole Hayes 


    Nicole is an award-winning author, podcaster and writing teacher. She co-hosts the ground-breaking all-female Australian football podcast ‘The Outer Sanctum’. This podcast has been recognised with an Australian Football Media Award for coverage of the AFLW, and a Sports Australia award in recognition of coverage of inclusive sport.  


    Nicole has also collaborated on a football book for younger readers about the inaugural women’s AFL competition, A Footy Girl’s Guide to the Stars of 2017. 


     


    Ryland Keeling 


    Ryland has a hospitality background and is currently studying a Bachelor of Primary Teaching. Before his Primary Teaching studies he completed a Diploma of Early Childhood Education. 


     


    Thankyou 


    Thank you to the guests who volunteered their time for this podcast, which was recorded by students from Swinburne University of Technology’s Diploma of Screen and Media – Sports Media. It forms part of Swinburne’s work preventing family violence. 


    You’ll hear these guests talking about gender stereotypes. You might be wondering – what’s the link between gender stereotypes and family violence? Well, rigid gender roles – people not being free to be what they want to be – is one of the drivers of family violence. If we can fix this, we can reduce the likelihood of family violence occurring. 


    We encourage you to share this series, and for the teachers out there, to freely use it as a teaching tool to promote positive gender relationships. 


    If you’d like to learn more about family violence and how to help prevent it, visit www.ourwatch.org.au 


    If this podcast has raised any issues for you or you need support, please contact one of these support services: 


    1800 RESPECT: 1800 737 732, www.1800respect.org.au 
    1800 RESPECT operates 24 hours a day to support people impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence and abuse. 


    Men’s Referral Service: 1300 766 491, www.ntv.org.au 
    The Men’s Referral Service is operated by No to Violence and provides advice for men about family violence. 


    Relationships Australia: 1300 364 277, www.relationships.org.au 
    Relationships Australia aims to support people in Australia to achieve positive and respectful relationships. 


    Lifeline: 13 11 14, www.lifeline.org.au 
    Lifeline provides 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention services. 


    Kids Helpline: 1800 551 800, www.kidshelp.com.au 
    Kids Helpline provides a free, confidential 24/7 online and phone counselling service for young people aged 5 to 25. 


    This podcast series is part of the Prevention Activity in Tertiary Education Settings project – TAFE, funded by the Victorian Government. 


    Recorded and produced on Wurundjeri land.  


    Music credits: Good Times by Scott Holmes Music is licensed under an Attribution-Non Commercial 4.0 International License. https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes/carefree-music-2020/good-t

    • 40 min
    Be different

    Be different

    How does a country like India compare with Australia in its approach to gender roles? What’s it like to fall into a career when you’re one of few females? How do you deal with having your sexuality debated because of what your job is? 


    Join our diverse panel of guests as they discuss how they’ve got to where they are now, the challenges they’ve faced, and what they’ve learnt along the way. 


     


    Hosts 


    Jake Lohmann, Max Donegan and DR Brink 


     


    Guests 


    Anagha Karandikar 


    Anagha is a Lecturer in Building Information Modelling at Swinburne University of Technology, an International Specialised Skills Institute (ISS) fellow, and also a practicing architect. She provides a unique insight into the evolution of roles across two countries – India and Australia. 


     


    Brendan Cottier 


    Brendan is a nurse and teacher and has always followed his own path. He grew up in a country town, and is heavily involved in his local football club which fields girls and boys teams.  


    Lisa Van Es 


     


    Thankyou


    Thank you to the guests who volunteered their time for this podcast, which was recorded by students from Swinburne University of Technology’s Diploma of Screen and Media – Sports Media. It forms part of Swinburne’s work preventing family violence. 


    You’ll hear these guests talking about gender stereotypes. You might be wondering – what’s the link between gender stereotypes and family violence? Well, rigid gender roles – people not being free to be what they want to be – is one of the drivers of family violence. If we can fix this, we can reduce the likelihood of family violence occurring. 


    We encourage you to share this series, and for the teachers out there, to freely use it as a teaching tool to promote positive gender relationships. 


    If you’d like to learn more about family violence and how to help prevent it, visit www.ourwatch.org.au 


    If this podcast has raised any issues for you or you need support, please contact one of these support services: 


    1800 RESPECT: 1800 737 732, www.1800respect.org.au 
    1800 RESPECT operates 24 hours a day to support people impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence and abuse. 


    Men’s Referral Service: 1300 766 491, www.ntv.org.au 
    The Men’s Referral Service is operated by No to Violence and provides advice for men about family violence. 


    Relationships Australia: 1300 364 277, www.relationships.org.au 
    Relationships Australia aims to support people in Australia to achieve positive and respectful relationships. 


    Lifeline: 13 11 14, www.lifeline.org.au 
    Lifeline provides 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention services. 


    Kids Helpline: 1800 551 800, www.kidshelp.com.au 
    Kids Helpline provides a free, confidential 24/7 online and phone counselling service for young people aged 5 to 25. 


    This podcast series is part of the Prevention Activity in Tertiary Education Settings project – TAFE, funded by the Victorian Government. 


    Recorded and produced on Wurundjeri land.  


    Music credits: Good Times by Scott Holmes Music is licensed under an Attribution-Non Commercial 4.0 International License. https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes/carefree-music-2020/good-times 

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
1 Rating

1 Rating

jmtc australia ,

Great podcast for teaching !

I really enjoyed this podcast as it shows why it is so important that people are allowed to pursue their dreams regardless of gender or background

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