6 episodes

Coachcast is platform of discussion and a source of knowledge sharing between professional coaches and leaders providing strategies and invaluable resources for professionals in the industry. Through compelling interviews with industry thought leaders, CoachCast aims to explore how coaching can assist in addressing issues and challenges faced by individuals, leaders and organisations.

CoachCast by IEC‪L‬ Pounéh Sedghi

    • Education
    • 4.9 • 17 Ratings

Coachcast is platform of discussion and a source of knowledge sharing between professional coaches and leaders providing strategies and invaluable resources for professionals in the industry. Through compelling interviews with industry thought leaders, CoachCast aims to explore how coaching can assist in addressing issues and challenges faced by individuals, leaders and organisations.

    Impacting community through coaching capability

    Impacting community through coaching capability

    Guest Bio

    Jonathan srikanthanAtlassian Foundation Director/Co-founder of Young Change AgentsJonathan or Jono Srikanthan, is the Atlassian Foundation Director and the co-founder of Young Change Agents, a social enterprise aimed at helping our young people see problems as opportunities. Jono gets excited about being able to make a positive change in his community and leading, motivating and empowering others to do the same in their community. Jono has managed two iconic Australia Foundations, Qantas and Atlassian, where he has had the opportunity to harness business resources for the betterment of society. Jono's focus areas include social innovation, corporate foundations, social enterprise, skilled volunteering, people leadership, organisational & career coaching. 
    SHOW NOTES In this episode, Jonathan Srikanthan, Atlassian Foundation Director talks about all things Atlassian, 1% pledge initiative, giving back to the community, tips for aspiring foundation managers and pro-bono coaching to the non-for-profit sector. Jonathan shares insights about his coach training with IECL and how coaching capacity can contribute to and have impact in our communities. It's a great episode with lots of gold nuggets. Please note this episode was recorded in early 2020 before the pandemic.  
    TranscriptRenee: So Jono, what can we as coaches or can organizations in general learn from the All Black psyche? You're a fan. Jono: I was surprised you put this question in here actually because for Christmas, I got given a book called Legacy and I highly recommend it. I'm only halfway through it mind you, which talks about what businesses can learn from the All Blacks. And the first chapter really stood out to me and the chapter is called Sweeping the Shed. So there's a tradition in the All Blacks that the top player of the game or the player of the match has the responsibility at the end of the game after all the work and the lockers are down, when people have changed and they go out that they have to clean it up, they have to pretty much sweep it out sort of thing. And it's a tradition that's been going for a while now. And the idea there is to maintain or bring humility back into the role back into players. To think that no one person is bigger than the team and bigger than the game. And I think that's something that we as coaches and we as organizations, businesses could really learn and the people we're serving and the people and the team that we're part of is actually bigger than us. And so humility, I think, is something that I'm learning a lot in my roles but as a coach and in Atlassian, the organization I'm working for. Renee: And speaking of Atlassian. What's it really like to work at Atlassian? Jono: You should know, you guys are based in the same building that we are. You know about our t-shirts and you know about the dress code that we have, but that's really very peripheral. It is probably one of the most remarkable companies I've ever worked for. The values are at the core of everything that we do. There's five values that govern it. Two of it has got some pretty interes

    • 31 min
    Leading in a Crisis

    Leading in a Crisis

    Guest Bio

    Clint CooperCEO, GrowthOpsA Chartered Accountant by training, Clint specialised in Corporate Insolvency with KPMG before diversifying into a progression of challenging executive roles in industry. After leading the performance turnaround of Freemans Insurance Services and setting them back on a path of sustainable growth, he joined Cricket Victoria. Over a 5-year tenure as CFO&COO, Clint oversaw the organisation's contemporary rebrand, reinvigorated its commercial platform and strengthened financial and governance processes, ensuring the ongoing success of one of Australia's oldest and most respected sporting institutions. In 2011 Clint established Cricket Victoria's pioneering Twenty20 Big Bash League club, the Melbourne Stars. In October last year he was appointed to his current position as CEO and MD of GrowthOps - a holding company combining the complementary capabilities of its creative and digital agencies with the coaching and leader development services provided through IECL.  
    SHOW NOTES In this rare interview Clint Cooper shares his leadership journey over the last decade from building a Club and supporter base as the first CEO of the Melbourne Stars Cricket Club, to his current role leading the turnaround of recently delisted company GrowthOps Limited. At the Stars he created an organisation from start-up to become one of the largest Clubs in the league. Over ten years he led an organisation in the very high-pressured, high-profile world of competitive sport through a deep commitment to the principles of fairness, honesty, camaraderie and the building of an environment where players and administrators alike loved to come work. In October 2020, after a short break he took on his role at GrowthOps and the challenge of turning around a company already under stress through a period of restructure and the impact of the Pandemic. In the space of a year he successfully steered the company of 400 people across six countries through an environment of considerable uncertainty to safer ground, largely from the confines of a small bedroom in suburban Melbourne. While extraordinarily challenging both physically and mentally, these circumstances allowed Clint to open his mind to what the actual opportunity of leadership could be when stripped to its core. Clint talks openly about the challenges and opportunities presented to him, what he has learned about himself and about leadership in this time, and the newfound levels of optimism and potential this has instilled in him for this next era of growth.
    TranscriptGabrielle Schroder: Clint, welcome to CoachCast by IECL. I must say it's a great pleasure to have you here, face-to-face after many months of lockdown in Victoria. I hope you're enjoying your time in Sydney.Clint Cooper:I certainly am. And thanks very much for inviting me into this wonderful podcast.Gabrielle Schroder: Wonderful. Let's start with defining what leadership means to you. On your LinkedIn profile, you highlight that as an executive leader, you're not just building a business, you're leading a philosophy. Tell us more about that. What is your leadership philosophy?Clint Cooper:Very good qu

    • 28 min
    Coaching Supervision

    Coaching Supervision

    Guest Bio

    Jane Porter
    head of coaching & coach accreditation, IECL
    Jane is the head of coaching at IECL, a role that leads and advises on the strategy modelling and approaches for coaching development. She oversees IECL’s large scale coaching programs for public, private, and not for profit clients, and also leads the development and delivery of IECL’s, ICF accredited coach training pathways, and ongoing professional development.
    Jane is passionate about increasing the professionalism of the industry and its strategic impact on organizational life. Jane, brings a wealth of knowledge and vast experience as an ICF master coach, educator, supervisor, and mentor across the Asia Pacific region. Thank you so much for being with us today.
    SHOW NOTESCoaching supervision is about creating a reflective space for the coach to think about their practice as a coach, but also reflect on themselves. It is in the context of self-care, increasing awareness of themselves as coach, being able to look at what is working and what is not, what stays with them after a coaching session and why that thing is staying with them. Also, a space to think through ethical dilemmas, tricky situations, perhaps mental health considerations that show up in coaching. 
    Transcript Jane Porter: Thank you for having me.Renee Holder:Okay, so we're looking at supervision and there are a number of varying definitions of supervision for coaches. How do you define supervision in a coaching context? Jane Porter:Primarily supervision is about creating a reflective space for the coach to think about their practice as a coach, but also reflect on themselves. So I think about it in the context of self care, increasing their awareness of themselves as coach, being able to look at what's working and what's not, perhaps what stays with them after a coaching session and why that thing is staying with them. And also a space to think through ethical dilemmas, tricky situations, perhaps mental health considerations that show up in coaching. So while the coach is busy working in service of the counterpart in the organization, who's in service of the coach? And I'd say that's the supervisor. Renee Holder:And you insist that all IECL coaches undertake supervision. Why is this? Jane Porter:Some of the reasons I think what I've just articulated there in that first question. As coaches, even if we're part of an organization, when we're out there in the world, in the practice of coaching, sitting in front of the counterpart, working with the organizations, there's a large piece of self-regulation in that role and being present with what the counterpart and the organization needs and working to keep your own...not your own thinking, but your own content out of that space and that's not easy. So there's a quality assurance piece for us at IECL that I didn't mention earlier around knowing that when a coach bumps up against any of those things we referred to, they have somewhere to go where they can put that thing down, they can have a look at it in a safe space with somebody who can help t

    • 20 min
    Coaching for Wellbeing

    Coaching for Wellbeing

    Guest Bio





    Audrey McGibbon
    Psychologist, Executive Coach & Wellbeing Expert\nAudrey has been a psychologist since 1990 with firsthand insights into the stresses and strains of life as a senior executive, and the impact of leaders’ behaviours on teams’ wellbeing and organisational performance. \n\nAudrey has been an executive coach to more than 500 leaders over the past 20 years. She is the co-founder of EEK & SENSE and the co-author of the Global Leadership Wellbeing Survey(GLWS) – an evidence-based coaching tool used by coaches with leaders and their teams to enable better wellbeing insights and actions for all. \n\nSince 2015 Audrey has been conducting investigative research into the wellbeing profiles of more than 5,000 leaders using the GLWS methodology.











    SHOW NOTES
    The World Health Organization has defined wellbeing as being in a complete state of physical, mental and social wellbeing, not merely as the absence of ill health, but as a positive thing. It’s an aspirational piece. We’re not really quite there in organizations at the moment. Certainly, there’s a way to go in running an education program helping leaders and employees alike understand that wellbeing is a really slippery, dynamic thing.
    Working harder is no longer the guaranteed path to being successful.
    Resilience is not a bad thing, but it’s being used in lieu of taking a more complex systemic approach to addressing organisational shortcomings.
    Leaders who are grounded and centred and able to deal with this constant disruption and constant change and the way they lead organizations, create the right environment for other people to not just survive but thrive. They are the sorts of leaders and they are the sorts of organizations that are going to go the distance and be really successful. We know that many organizations have much shorter lifespans these days i.e. they go out of business. Why do they go out of business? It’s not for the lack of working hard, but are they sufficiently centred, grounded, focused, visionary? Are they sufficiently creative and agile?
    There’s a lot of research around to show that these are the predictors of success in the future. And in order to be able to do those things, you’ve got to be able to pause, stop, reflect, have a breath, recharge, replenish, recover, rest. Dare I say all sorts of potentially quite old fashioned concepts? But they are the things that are setting the organizations who are going to have longevity and successful development over the years ahead apart from the ones who aren’t going to be around.
    As coaches, it’s our job to help leaders confront what they might be fearful of, by changing some habits.






    Transcript

    Renee: Audrey, you’ve been a psychologist since 1990. You have firsthand insights into the stresses and strains of life as a senior executive, and the impact of leaders’ beh

    • 36 min
    Organisational Coaching - what is it and what’s trending

    Organisational Coaching - what is it and what’s trending

    Guest Bio

    Jane Porter
    Head of Coaching & Coach Accreditation, Coaching and Leadership
    Jane is the head of coaching at IECL, a role that leads and advises on the strategy modeling and approaches for coaching development.

    She oversees IECLs large scale coaching programs for public, private, and not for profit clients. And also lead the development and delivery of IECLs, ICF accredited coach training pathways, and ongoing professional development.

    Jane is passionate about increasing the professionalism of the industry and its strategic impact on organizational life.

    Jane, brings a wealth of knowledge and vast experience as an ICF master coach, educator, supervisor, and mentor across the Asia Pacific region.
    SHOW NOTES
    There are a number of types of coaching including life, business, career coaching, and there are niche offerings and new areas of expertise emerging all the time.

    Organisational coaching happens in organisations of course, and in an organisational coaching engagement or relationship, there's the person that you're coaching, but the organisation also has a stake in that piece of work and the stakeholders side of organisational coaching might be one person, it might be a line manager for example, but it may be a number of people.

    If you're the CEO of an organisation, for example, the stakeholder might be the whole board. There's more than just the coaching counterpart in the engagement, work and in the relationship. As an organisational coach, you are also there in service of the individual that you're working with and you are there in service of that broader stakeholder system.

    When we come into the actual coaching, it's a series of structured conversations that are focused on generating different thinking for the individual in the context of organisational focus areas and goals that have been agreed together with the stakeholders.
    Transcript
     Renee Holder:

    Jane Porter, welcome to Coach Cast. We are delighted to have you as our guest today. Jane, you are the head of coaching at IECL, a role that leads and advises on the strategy modelling and approaches for coaching development. You oversee IECL’s large scale coaching programs for public, private, and not for profit clients. And also lead the development and delivery of IECL’s, ICF accredited coach training pathways, and ongoing professional development. You are passionate about increasing the professionalism of the industry and its strategic impact on organizational life. Jane, you bring a wealth of knowledge and a vast experience as an ICF master coach, educator, supervisor, and mentor across the Asia Pacific region. Thank you so much for being with us today.

    Jane Porter:
    Thank you Renee. Good morning.

    Renee Holder:
    Good morning. Okay, so Jane, there are a number of types of coaching including life, business, career coaching, and there are niche offerings and new areas of expertise emerging all the time. How do you broadly define organisational coaching?

    Jane Porter:
    Let's come at that from a number of different ways. So organisational coaching happens in organisations of course, and

    • 24 min
    Coaching and the board in the age of disruption

    Coaching and the board in the age of disruption

    Guest Bio

    Gabrielle Schroder
    Group director for coaching and leadership at Institute of Executive Coaching and Leadership.
    Gabrielle leads a practice that specializes in developing human potential. Gabrielle has had a successful business career spanning 25 years, most recently in a variety of leadership roles with the Australian Institute of Company Directors or AICD. As an experienced director and practice lead, she has advised boards and executive teams, helping companies govern for growth, drive performance, and achieve sustained value.
    Immediately prior to joining IECL Gabrielle was the head of the AICDs board advisory practice, a practice she built from the ground up. Fellow and graduate of AICD, fellow of the National Heart Foundation of Australia, chair of the New South Wales Cardiovascular Research Network and a committee member of the 30% Club in Australia, an international working group dedicated to improving diversity on boards.
    SHOW NOTES
    Directors are human beings like the rest of us. Coaching plays a significant role in helping them see themselves more fully and therefore show up differently around the board room table.

    In times of crisis the impact & the toll that is taken on directors when they find themselves in the firing line can be devastating.

    What we have responsibility for, as institutions that educate at that level, is to make sure that we're building resilience, capability and capacity so that those situations are prevented

    The Royal Commission, particularly the Hayne Royal Commission has brought to the fore some real expectations on the part of consumers regarding the board's role in governing for culture and behaviours and the decisions that employees make in their organization.

    Boards are struggling to reorient around what is becoming a much greater level of understanding and knowledge in our community on what good governance is and should be. Boards are having to really respond to rising community expectations around that role.

    If you think about the role of the board, the board is supposed to be independent of management and the organization. It can be very difficult to grasp how boards might actually execute on controlling for behaviours in an organization. Marrying the worlds of governance and coaching has a significant role to play in helping boards to navigate that quite paradoxical challenge.

    A research piece by AICD with hundred chairmen on “when does good governance lead to better organizational performance?” highlighted some interrelating findings:

    good governance is situational
    governance was perceived by the chairmen as a team activity.
    individuals, directors and executives all need to bring an independence of mind to decision making.
    good decision making benefits from different perspectives, different lenses.
    There is a need to maintain openness to alternative views: a genuine ability to be able to suspend judgment and to be able to change one's views in light of a better alternative.

    For boards today, these traits coupled with how the board builds its relationship with the executive maintaining independence, but equally building high levels of trust is really critica

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

Dontqorryaboutit ,

Great podcast

Really liked the topics covered, so relevant to current context

Mabel and Buddy ,

Episode 6

I really enjoyed listening to Andy. I was fortunate to be trained by Andy and he is a first class coach, nice guy and with a great sense of humour that you will hear in this episode.

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