7 episodes

We inhabit an almost inconceivably vast and ancient universe. Yet our telescopes and theories are able to probe the dawn of time, before the Earth existed, when the observable universe was tiny, hot, and dense.

Cosmic Origins is the story of the universe but it's also our story. Hear about origin of space and time, mass and energy, the atoms in our bodies, the compact objects where matter can end up, and the planets and moons where life may flourish. Modern cosmology includes insights and triumphs, but mysteries remain. Our six speakers explore cosmology’s historical and cultural backdrop to explain the discoveries that speak of our cosmic origins.

Cosmic Origins University of Arizona

    • Science
    • 5.0, 4 Ratings

We inhabit an almost inconceivably vast and ancient universe. Yet our telescopes and theories are able to probe the dawn of time, before the Earth existed, when the observable universe was tiny, hot, and dense.

Cosmic Origins is the story of the universe but it's also our story. Hear about origin of space and time, mass and energy, the atoms in our bodies, the compact objects where matter can end up, and the planets and moons where life may flourish. Modern cosmology includes insights and triumphs, but mysteries remain. Our six speakers explore cosmology’s historical and cultural backdrop to explain the discoveries that speak of our cosmic origins.

    • video
    Cosmology: Making Sense of the Universe

    Cosmology: Making Sense of the Universe

    Our "cosmology" is the sum of our assumptions and deductions of how the universe behaves. With the advent of modern physics, the term has been appropriated by physicists and astronomers to represent a scientific description of the origin and nature of the physical universe. But cosmologies can also be outlined in ways that don't use physics and astronomy. Indeed, there is continual feedback between prevailing nonscientific assumptions about the universe and the scientific picture, with each influencing the direction of the other. We'll look at a series of historical cosmologies, and discuss the sometimes hidden assumptions that underlie modern astronomy. Feb. 1, 2011

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Transcript Cosmology: Making Sense of the Universe

    Transcript Cosmology: Making Sense of the Universe

    A transcribed version of Brother Guy's lecture, saved as a PDF document.

    • video
    Origin of the Universe: The Big Bang

    Origin of the Universe: The Big Bang

    The scientific story of creation begins 13.7 billion years ago in a circumstance of incredible temperature and density, when all matter and radiation was contained in a region smaller than an atom. The big bang is now a mature theory, with a web of observational evidence supporting it; and the size, shape and age of the universe have been measured with impressive accuracy. This talk will tell the story of how an iota of space-time turned into a vast cold universe of 100 billion galaxies. Presented Tuesday, February 8, 2011.

    The College of Science's "Cosmic Origins" lecture series is the story of the universe but it's also our story. Hear about origin of space and time, mass and energy, the atoms in our bodies, the compact objects where matter can end up, and the planets and moons where life may flourish. Modern cosmology includes insights and triumphs, but mysteries remain. Join the six speakers who explore cosmology's historical and cultural backdrop to explain the discoveries that speak of our cosmic origins.
    http://cos.arizona.edu/cosmic/

    • 1 hr 5 min
    • video
    Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Inflation: The Big Mysteries of Cosmology

    Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Inflation: The Big Mysteries of Cosmology

    Our current cosmological model describes the evolution of the universe from a very early burst of accelerated expansion (known as inflation) a tiny fraction of a second after the beginning, through the assembly of galaxies and large-scale structure shaped by dark matter, to our present epoch where dark energy controls the ultimate fate of the universe. As successful as it is, this model rests upon three mysterious pillars: inflation, dark energy and particle dark matter. All three point to exciting and important new physics that have yet to be revealed and understood -- or possibly, to a fatal flaw in the paradigm.

    The University of Arizona College of Science's Cosmic Origins lecture series is the story of the universe but it's also our story. Hear about origin of space and time, mass and energy, the atoms in our bodies, the compact objects where matter can end up, and the planets and moons where life may flourish. Modern cosmology includes insights and triumphs, but mysteries remain. Join the six speakers who will explore cosmology's historical and cultural backdrop to explain the discoveries that speak of our cosmic origins.
    http://cos.arizona.edu/cosmic/

    • 1 hr 11 min
    • video
    Astronomical Alchemy: The Origin of the Elements

    Astronomical Alchemy: The Origin of the Elements

    One of the greatest achievements of twentieth-century science is an understanding of the origin of matter. While hydrogen and helium were produced in the Big Bang, the origin of the heavier elements—the silicon in rocks, the iron in our blood, and the oxygen we breathe--lies in the lifecycle of stars. Nuclear reactions, which transform light elements into heavier ones, cause stars to shine and ultimately to explode, seeding the universe with their production. These newly formed elements, the building blocks of ordinary matter, play a central role in the formation of planets and the evolution of life. Presented Feb. 22, 1011.

    Cosmic Origins is the story of the universe but it's also our story. Hear about origin of space and time, mass and energy, the atoms in our bodies, the compact objects where matter can end up, and the planets and moons where life may flourish. Modern cosmology includes insights and triumphs, but mysteries remain. Join the six speakers who explore cosmology's historical and cultural backdrop to explain the discoveries that speak of our cosmic origins. http://cos.arizona.edu/cosmic/

    • 1 hr 4 min
    • video
    Origins of Black Holes: Gravity at Its Extreme

    Origins of Black Holes: Gravity at Its Extreme

    Gravity is the most important force in the universe, holding together planetary systems, stars, and galaxies. It is what makes the stars hot enough to shine and what keeps the Earth close enough to the Sun for life to form. It is also what ends the life of every massive star with a spectacular collapse and the formation of a black hole. Finding and studying hundreds of black holes within the Milky Way and in other galaxies brings us closer to understanding gravity at its extreme.

    Cosmic Origins is the story of the universe but it's also our story. Hear about origin of space and time, mass and energy, the atoms in our bodies, the compact objects where matter can end up, and the planets and moons where life may flourish. Modern cosmology includes insights and triumphs, but mysteries remain. Join the six speakers who will explore cosmology's historical and cultural backdrop to explain the discoveries that speak of our cosmic origins.
    http://cos.arizona.edu/cosmic/

    • 59 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Paul Thompson 3131 ,

Paul Thompson

Astronomy and the cosmos is something that I have been interested in since reading Carl Sagans book, "Cosmos" a few years ago. So I was interested to watch this series of public lectures on "Cosmic Origins". And I must say I was glued to my TV for the length of all these presentations and was constantly amazed at how up-to-date the information was and just how mind bogglingly, amazingly interesting these presenters are.

This is an excellent and well explained lecture series that can be easily understood by the general public and also appreciated by people with a scientific backgroud.

The production values of this entire lecture series are very good. The series has been well editied so that the overhead pictures and diagrams are interspersed seamlessly throughout the presentations so that you don't get jerky camera movements that I have seen acompany other (otherwise very good and worthwhile) presentations. The audio quality is superb also.

Thank you University of Arizona. I am eternally grateful to you for taking the time and effort to present these lectures and - on top of all that - produce these on iTunes so that I can watch them and be amazed and totally in awe of this amazing universe that we all inhabit.

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you !!!

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