21 min

Cyberconflict and ICT Security in the ASEAN Region - Mr Bart Hogeveen SSEAC Stories

    • News

We have seen a dramatic increase in incidents involving the malicious use of Information and Computer Technologies (ICTs) by state and non-state actors. These constitute risks for all states and may harm international peace and security. Certain states are developing military capabilities, and the use of ICTs in future conflict between states is more likely. Southeast Asia cannot be expected to escape these global trends. States are affected by them and/or feel compelled to develop their own capabilities. While national Computer Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) are well established, investments in cyber units within the national security apparatuses are less well published, and if known, details are covered in deep secrecy. This angle to ICTs has not featured prominently on ASEAN’s agenda when compared to conventional regional security issues or the socio-economic aspects of ICTs. When it comes to addressing inter-state incidents, governments in the region have not been feeling comfortable or in a position to draw lines about what activities they deem responsible state behaviour and what are unacceptable operations in cyberspace.

In the lead-up to SSEAC's annual ASEAN Forum, Mr Bart Hogeveen sat down with Mr Kean Wong to discuss cyberconflict and ICT security in the ASEAN region.

Bart Hogeveen is Head of Cyber Capacity Building at ASPI’s International Cyber Policy Centre. He supports international and regional mechanisms to enhance cyberstability with governments and nongovernmental organisations across Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Bart currently directs a multiyear effort supporting further adoption of international norms and cyber-confidence building measures in the ASEAN region. He authored the Sydney Recommendations on Practical Futures on Cyber Confidence Building in the ASEAN region and publishes on The Strategist on related international cyber-security topics.

You can follow Bart on Twitter @BartHoogeveen.

View the transcript here: https://bit.ly/3ergMDG

We have seen a dramatic increase in incidents involving the malicious use of Information and Computer Technologies (ICTs) by state and non-state actors. These constitute risks for all states and may harm international peace and security. Certain states are developing military capabilities, and the use of ICTs in future conflict between states is more likely. Southeast Asia cannot be expected to escape these global trends. States are affected by them and/or feel compelled to develop their own capabilities. While national Computer Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) are well established, investments in cyber units within the national security apparatuses are less well published, and if known, details are covered in deep secrecy. This angle to ICTs has not featured prominently on ASEAN’s agenda when compared to conventional regional security issues or the socio-economic aspects of ICTs. When it comes to addressing inter-state incidents, governments in the region have not been feeling comfortable or in a position to draw lines about what activities they deem responsible state behaviour and what are unacceptable operations in cyberspace.

In the lead-up to SSEAC's annual ASEAN Forum, Mr Bart Hogeveen sat down with Mr Kean Wong to discuss cyberconflict and ICT security in the ASEAN region.

Bart Hogeveen is Head of Cyber Capacity Building at ASPI’s International Cyber Policy Centre. He supports international and regional mechanisms to enhance cyberstability with governments and nongovernmental organisations across Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Bart currently directs a multiyear effort supporting further adoption of international norms and cyber-confidence building measures in the ASEAN region. He authored the Sydney Recommendations on Practical Futures on Cyber Confidence Building in the ASEAN region and publishes on The Strategist on related international cyber-security topics.

You can follow Bart on Twitter @BartHoogeveen.

View the transcript here: https://bit.ly/3ergMDG

21 min

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