34 episodes

The Cyclical Podcast brings together voices of faithful innovators to gain wisdom, best practices, and post-colonial frameworks to guide you on your journey of leading transformation through the Church.

Cyclical INC is a multi-tiered relationship network of humans who are partnering with the Holy Spirit in the work of starting new churches. Listen and subscribe today.

Cyclical Podcast Cyclical INC

    • Religion & Spirituality

The Cyclical Podcast brings together voices of faithful innovators to gain wisdom, best practices, and post-colonial frameworks to guide you on your journey of leading transformation through the Church.

Cyclical INC is a multi-tiered relationship network of humans who are partnering with the Holy Spirit in the work of starting new churches. Listen and subscribe today.

    Season 3 Mixdown

    Season 3 Mixdown

    In the final episode of Season 3, Nick Warnes, Karen Rohrer, and Brendan McClenahan reflect on the season, highlighting key themes and takeaways. 


    Are churches in the business of meaning-making?
    Do faithful innovators need to hustle like entrepreneurs?
    How do stories create empathy?
    How do we listen to our internal voices of resistance?
    How do innovators see and understand themselves as whole people?
    How do you take a complex situation and make it clear for others?


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    • 27 min
    #9: Liz Lin: How do you become someone who starts things?

    #9: Liz Lin: How do you become someone who starts things?

    In today's episode, Nick Warnes & Karen Rohrer have a dialogue with Liz Lin. Liz Lin (she/her) is the director and co-founder of Progressive Asian American Christians and a senior fellow at Newbigin House of Studies in San Francisco.  She's also a writer and educator on the topics of race and culture.  She has a PhD in clinical psychology, as well as master's degrees in theology and psychology, from Fuller Theological Seminary.  She lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan, with her spouse and children. 

    To find out more about Liz Lin you can visit her at mynameiselizabeth.com, @curiousliz on Twitter, and @lizlinsta on Instagram.


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    • 39 min
    #8: R. Eric Thomas: How can we use story to innovate?

    #8: R. Eric Thomas: How can we use story to innovate?

    In today's episode, Nick Warnes & Karen Rohrer have a dialogue with R. Eric Thomas, a national bestselling author, playwright, and screenwriter. His books include Here for It, or How to Save Your Soul in America, which was featured as a "Read with Jenna" pick on NBC's Today, and Reclaiming Her Time: The Power of Maxine Waters, co-authored with Helena Andrews-Dyer. For four years, he wrote "Eric Reads the News” a wildly popular daily humor column covering pop culture and politics on ELLE.com. Eric has written on the Peabody Award-winning series Dickinson on AppleTV+ and Better Things on FX. Off the page, Eric is also the long-running host of The Moth StorySlams in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., and has been heard multiple times on The Moth Radio Hour, NPR's All Things Considered and It's Been A Minute with Sam Sanders.

    To find out more about R. Eric Thomas you can visit https://rericthomas.com/. 

    Here are some quotes from today's interview: 


    "I mean, no one is going to arrest me for saying I'm a writer"
    "I can start walking in a certain direction without fully know why I'm doing it."
    "It starts off listening to myself, but then it immediately moves to listening to the way I sound in the world... the minute you start involving other people it becomes an interrogation of yourself."
    "I think of story as an empathy engine."
    "There is a silence that is so active and electric... listening to that silence is really useful to me."

    Please review this episode, subscribe to this podcast and share it with a friend! Make sure to visit our website, cyclicalinc.com.


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    • 38 min
    #7: Candice Czubernat: How do you manage risk during innovation?

    #7: Candice Czubernat: How do you manage risk during innovation?

    In today's episode, Nick Warnes & Karen Rohrer has a dialogue with Candice Czubernat. Candice Czubernat has been a therapist for 15 years and is the founder of the LGBTQ affirming counseling and coaching practice, The Christian Closet.  She and her team meet with people from all over the world for online telehealth sessions as they navigate the intersections of having an LGBTQ+ identity with a Christian faith.  Candice is a graduate of The Moody Bible Institute and The Seattle School of Theology and Psychology.   She identifies as a lesbian and a Christian.  She lives in a small mountain town in southern California with her wife, the love of her life, Crystal, and their 7-year-old boy/girl twins Deacon and Dylan. 

    To find out more about Candice Czubernat, you can visit www.thechristiancloset.com.


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    • 34 min
    #6: Michaela O'Donnell: How do you get started in innovation?

    #6: Michaela O'Donnell: How do you get started in innovation?

    In today's episode, Nick Warnes & Karen Rohrer have a dialogue with Michaela O'Donnell. Michaela O'Donnell, PhD is the Executive Director of the Max De Pree Center for Leadership at Fuller Seminary. She is the author of Make Work Matter: Your Guide to Meaningful Work in a Changing World. Additionally, Michaela is the owner of Long Winter Media, a creative agency she founded with her husband Dan.

    To find out more about Michaela O'Donnell you can visit @michaela.odonnell, michaelaodonnell.com, and degree.org/make-work-matter. Here are some quotes from today's interview: 


    ""Sometimes it means snorkeling and scuba-diving at the same time... and that's not recommended!""
    ""The very first thing is to be clear.""
    ""Practicing empathy along the way ... practicing imagination ... practicing the next doable risk ... practicing reflection on your action

    Please review this episode, subscribe to this podcast and share it with a friend!


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    • 39 min
    #5: Erin Angeli: How do different people innovate differently?

    #5: Erin Angeli: How do different people innovate differently?

    In today's episode, Nick Warnes and Karen Rohrer have a dialogue with Erin Angeli. Erin Angeli is part of the pastoral staff at Commonwealth of Oakland, a new, Jesus-centered community of faith in Pittsburgh. She and her wife Sarah keep a steadily growing urban homestead with raised vegetable garden beds, chickens, and a menagerie of pets.

    Erin’s work at Commonwealth is wide-ranging, but her favorite focuses are ministry to the Oakland neighborhood and pastoral care to queer folks. Erin’s goal in her queer ministry is twofold: to provide pastoral care to those discerning their relationship with the Church, and to organize local religious leaders to design systems of support for queer Christians.

    To find out more about Erin Angeli you can visit www.oaklandcommonwealth.com. 

    Here are some quotes from today's interview: 


    "Collaborative leadership in a neighborhood context looks like, What do you want to do? And here's what I see happening. I recognize that as a gift."
    "Just because you're the most knowledgable, most privileged white person in the room doesn't mean you know what's best."
    "Sometimes another leader has a vision that you don't get... you're not sure this is gonna fly and you just have to sit back. It's a whole other level of the kingdom when you see something you didn't think would work, work."
    "All you do is just hand people hammers."
    "If we're feeling stuck, we take the problem and plop it right in the middle of the congregation. Every single time they discern the Holy Spirit perfectly."


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    • 36 min