68 episodes

The data podcast for CEOs, founders, and innovators. How are successful leaders using data and analytics to build companies, find efficiencies, and develop new capabilities to solve some of the world’s most challenging problems? Hear directly from top leaders, across industries. We'll explore the opportunities and limitations of data, analytics, machine learning, and AI.

Data Crunch Data Crunch Corporation

    • Natural Sciences

The data podcast for CEOs, founders, and innovators. How are successful leaders using data and analytics to build companies, find efficiencies, and develop new capabilities to solve some of the world’s most challenging problems? Hear directly from top leaders, across industries. We'll explore the opportunities and limitations of data, analytics, machine learning, and AI.

    Machine Learning and Flight with Ian Cassidy

    Machine Learning and Flight with Ian Cassidy

    Ian Cassidy: When you did a PCA, a principal component analysis, like, it was like beautiful. There was, like, a red circle in the middle of, you know, the blue on purchase, you know, data points. And there were the red purchase ones and they were all clustered together. It was, it was really interesting. And like the, the machine learning model had a really good time trying to predict that the ones in that red cluster where the things that people were were interested in purchasing. Ginette: I'm Ginette, Curtis: and I'm Curtis, Ginette: and you are listening to Data Crunch, Curtis: a podcast about how applied data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence are changing the world. Ginette: Data Crunch is produced by the Data Crunch Corporation, an analytics, training, and consulting company. If you want to become the type of tech talent we talk about on our show today, you’ll need to master algorithms, machine learning concepts, computer science basics, and many other important concepts. Brilliant is a great place to start digging into these. The nice thing about Brilliant is that you can learn in bite-sized pieces at your own pace, and with a bit of consistent effort, you can tackle some really tough subjects. With 60+ courses that combine story-telling, code-writing, and interactive challenges, Brilliant helps develop the skills that are crucial to school, job interviews, and careers. Sign up for free and start learning by going to Brilliant.org slash Data Crunch, and also the first 200 people that go to that link will get 20% off the annual premium subscription.  Now onto our show. We’ve waited to publish today’s episode because Covid has taken a toll on the travel industry and lots of things have changed since we recorded this episode, but there’s good information in this episode, so we don’t want to wait too long to publish it. Hopefully 2021 changes the travel industry’s fortunes and this information becomes even more applicable. So today we chat with Ian Cassidy, former senior data scientist at Upside Business Travel. Ian: I'm Ian Cassidy. And my interests are in the machine learning optimization realm, since I have experience with that from my grad school days, and a little bit about Upside is we are a travel company, travel management company. We offer a product that is no fees, 100% free. And in fact, if you spend over a hundred thousand dollars booking travel on our website, we offer a 3% cash back, as well as free customer service, 24/7, no contracts. So that's you sign up with us, no contracts, you get all of this as soon as you sign up. We are a one-stop shop to book and manage all of your travel. In one place, we offer flights, hotels, rental cars, and we also offer expense integration and reporting for companies looking to, to manage all of their, their travelers and, and their expenses for that.Curtis: Right on. We talked before about the journey that your company has gone through, uh, to figure out how to best use data, you know, how to target and what really works with, with machine learning and things like this. So I'd love to just talk a little bit about that: where you guys started and how you guys made some decisions, what you learned along the way and what you're, what you're up to from a data science perspective.Ian: Yeah, sure. So, uh, you know, like you mentioned, things have changed quite a bit at Upside. We started off as a B2C company where we were targeting what we were calling do it yourself travelers. You did not have to be logged into our site in order to start doing a search and book flights or hotels. So that kind of made it interesting from a data collection perspective. We had like some unique IDs about who the people were that were doing the searching, but it was, it was largely kind of, you know, we didn't really know much about you when you, when you were s

    • 22 min
    Implementing ML Algorithms with Ylan Kazi

    Implementing ML Algorithms with Ylan Kazi

    • 26 min
    Hiring Top Tech Talent

    Hiring Top Tech Talent

    • 18 min
    Making Data Assets Profitable with VDC

    Making Data Assets Profitable with VDC

    Many companies are sitting on data assets that could be revenue streams for them, without knowing it. Matt Staudt of VDC discusses making latent data profitable.

    Ginette: I'm Ginette, Curtis: and I'm Curtis, Ginette: and you are listening to Data Crunch, Curtis: a podcast about how applied data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence are changing the world. Ginette: Data Crunch is produced by the Data Crunch Corporation, an analytics, training, and consulting company. Ginette: Today, we chat with the president and CEO at the Venture Development Center, Matt Staudt. Matt Staudt: The company that I'm with is VDC, Venture Development Center. Basically VDC is an organization that works in the alternative big data, bringing buyer and seller together. So we have a unique perspective on available data assets that are out in the marketplace and a unique perspective of the companies that utilize them, and what they're specifically looking for in the way of points of, uh, value for various data assets. My background was originally in the marketing and advertising area, where I owned a company for 20 years, IMG, Interactive Marketing Group. I left that in 2007 and joined this, which was more or less of a lifestyle organization. And we made it a full-fledged organization company back in 2010.Curtis: Now, when you say data assets, can you put a little bit of definition around that for the listeners? Just so they understand how you define a data asset? 'Cause I imagine there may be some things that you think are valuable that maybe they haven't thought of, or maybe it'll help expand our thinking around what a data asset is.Matt: Yeah, sure. In my, in my terminology "data asset" basically falls into eight different categories, where assets basically come from within the information world. So they could be things like transaction data or crowdsource data. They could be things like search data or social data sets. They fall into various categories, traditional data, meaning assets that are business to business or business to consumer generally aggregated by large companies that most everybody's heard of Dun & Bradstreet, Infogroup, Axcium, the credit bureaus, et cetera. Alternative data in our world are companies that have unique data points, unique. They're collecting unique pieces of information, usually as a byproduct of their core business. And we look at the assets that the data sets, the actual data points that they collect. And we figure out if there might be something of value to take to the marketplace, usually to the large consumers of the data, the big aggregators that I previously mentioned, but oftentimes it also fits well with some of our mid-tier players. And we have a significant amount of relationships in the brand grouping, meaning large organizations that they themselves are looking to try and take advantage of big data and utilize data in sales, marketing operations, in order to transform or help to administer certain activities that they have going on.Curtis: Do you find that this is maybe industry specific, like for example, a big insurance company, or if you're in healthcare or something like this, it tends to be more data intensive that you see more activity there or, or is this really applicable across the board? What kind of industries do you find have a lot of applications?Matt: Yeah. Well, it's interesting on the surface, you certainly think that there's probably industries that would have a larger appetite and a larger need for data than, than other organizations, but going, you know, through the list of companies that we've helped over the last 15 or 20 years, it really runs the gamut. I mean, we've worked with insurances, you mentioned insurance, insurance companies. I mentioned credit bureaus. We work with credit bureaus, risk and fraud, sales and marketing, sometimes large brands within those

    • 23 min
    Machine Learning with Max Sklar

    Machine Learning with Max Sklar

    • 20 min
    Think Differently with Graph Databases

    Think Differently with Graph Databases

    • 31 min

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