80 episodes

Each fortnight, hosts Lauren and Alicia delve into a ‘deviant’ woman from history, fiction, mythology and the contemporary world: those who aren’t afraid to break the rules, to subvert the system, to explore, to seek and to challenge the status quo.

Deviant Women Lipp Media

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.3, 93 Ratings

Each fortnight, hosts Lauren and Alicia delve into a ‘deviant’ woman from history, fiction, mythology and the contemporary world: those who aren’t afraid to break the rules, to subvert the system, to explore, to seek and to challenge the status quo.

    Rosa May Billinghurst

    Rosa May Billinghurst

    By the turn of the twentieth century, the fight for women's suffrage in the United Kingdom had already been raging for nearly forty years. Suffragists everywhere had been calling for changes that would allow women the right to become part of the political life of the nation, but their pleas had persistently been denied. Frustrated and angered, a new generation of activist women rose up, and the suffragette was born. With the motto 'deeds, not words', these fierce women were through asking nicely and, turning to militant tactics, they literally put their lives on the line to demand change. Among them was a woman who rarely escaped attention. With her modified tricycle for mobility, Rosa May Billinghurst threw herself into the fray alongside her sisters, suffering at the hands of mobs of angry men and a cruel and ruthless legal system. Ultimately they would be successful, but in a world where so many rights are still for the few rather than for all, their struggle for equality resonates as deeply today as it did over a hundred years ago.


    So get ready to take to the streets (not literally! Stay home! Stay safe!) and join us as we venture into the protest marches and picket lines of suffragette city!


    Andrews, Maggie, & Lomas, Janis. Hidden Heroines: The Forgotten Suffragettes. Crowood Press Ltd, 2018.
    Purvis, June. ‘The prison experiences of the suffragettes in Edwardian Britain’, Women's History Review, 4 (1995), 103–33.
    Trueman, H. ‘Billinghhurst, (Rosa) May (1875-1953). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2004.
    Van Wingerden, Sophia A. The Women's Suffrage Movement in Britain, 1866-1928. Palgrave McMillan, 2002.


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    • 1 hr 9 min
    Bonus Episode - Deviant Travel Heroines

    Bonus Episode - Deviant Travel Heroines

    For one last Women’s History Month celebration, we teamed up with Steph and Andrea from ‘All the S**t I’ve Learned Abroad’ to share tales of our favourite travel heroines. All four of us are avid solo female adventuresses, but perhaps we wouldn’t be if it wasn’t for the women who paved the way. From Isabelle Eberhardt’s cross-dressing nomadic life in North Africa, to Aloha Wanderwell’s seven-year road trip, Robyn Davidson’s solo trek through the Australian desert, and Jeanne Baret’s circumnavigation of the world, these are some of the most bad-ass, intrepid and inspiring women around. So strap on your metaphorical boots and imagine the world outside your window in this special bonus episode.
    And, if you want some travel reading to keep you occupied or distracted – whichever you need in these times, we’ve got you covered!


    Robyn Davidson (1980) Tracks: A Woman's Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback. Vintage. 


    Isabelle Eberhardt (1995) Prisoner of Dunes. trans. by. Sharon Bangert. Peter Owen Publishers. London & Chester Springs PA.
     
    Isabelle Eberhardt (2003) Nomad: The Diaries of Isabelle Eberhardt. ed. by. Elizabeth Kershaw. Interlink Books (first published in English as The Passionate Nomad: The Journals of Isabelle Eberhardt, 1987, Virago Press)
     
    Isabelle Eberhardt (2003) In the Shadow of Islam. trans. by. Sharon Bangert. Peter Owen Publishers. London & Chester Springs PA.
     
    Jeff Moag (2019) Jeanne Baret The First Woman to Sail Around the World Was a Cross-Dressing Botanist, Adventure Journal
     
    Aloha Wanderwell (1939, re-released 2016) Call to Adventure! True Tales of the Wanderwell Expedition, Nile Baker Estate & Boyd Production Group Publishing
     
    Additional essayists/writers mentioned: Rebecca Solnit, Joan Didion, Mary Shelley, Simone de Beauvoir, and Virginia Woolf


    If you want to hear more from Steph and Andrea’s adventures, check them out wherever you listen to podcasts! www.podfollow.com/shitabroadpod


    If you want to support Deviant Women, follow us on: 
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    @DeviantWomen
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    @deviantwomenpodcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Liane de Pougy

    Liane de Pougy

    In the underworld of Paris's Belle Epoque, where the wealthiest of men flocked to mingle with the beautiful and cultured demimondaine, Liane de Pougy found the calling she didn't know she was looking for. After leaving her abusive husband and young son, eighteen-year-old Anne-Marie Chassagne found herself in this centre of pleasure and decided to take up with the reigning queen of courtesans, Valtesse de la Bigne. Under her mistresses' tutelage, Chassagne, who renamed herself Liane de Pougy, would go on to grace the stage at the Folies-Bergere, be courted by the likes of Leopold II, and publish subversive sapphic auto-fiction. But it wasn't all partying. After losing her prince husband, Pougy took the veil and devoted her life to supporting those with disabilities.


    So in this time of great uncertainty, escape with us into the the fabulous and decadent world of the Belle Epoque!


    Griffin, Susan. The book of the courtesans: a catalogue of their virtues. Broadway, 2002.
    Hewitt, Catherine. The Mistress of Paris: The 19th-century Courtesan who Built an Empire on a Secret. St. Martin's Press, 2017.
    Prioleau, Elizabeth. Seductress: Women who ravished the world and their lost art of love. Penguin, 2004. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 1 hr 25 min
    Bessie Smith

    Bessie Smith

    At the turn of the twentieth-century, in the rowdy streets of Chattanooga, Tennessee, a young Bessie Smith was literally singing for her supper. Busking alongside her brother, Bessie learned the hard way just what it took to capture an audience against the odds: to sing and dance and demand attention despite the clatter of carts and the shouts of storeowners and vendors selling their wares. This early foray into the performing life would help shape Smith into the greatest performer of her age, rising up to the heights of Empress of the Blues and becoming the highest paid black entertainer of her day. In her private life she was just as bold and brash as her stage persona, never shying away from saying what she thought and more than happy to get into a fistfight or two. So put the needle on some vinyl and join us we get down and bluesy with Bessie Smith.
     
    Brooks, Edward. The Bessie Smith Companion. Da Capo, 1983.
    Clark, John. Experiencing Bessie Smith: A Listeners Companion. Rowman and Littlefield, 2017.
    NPR’s “Jazz Profiles” Bessie Smith: ‘Blues Empress’. May 7, 2008, https://www.npr.org/2008/05/07/90206287/bessie-smith-blues-empress
    Scott, Michelle R. Blues Empress in Black Chattanooga: Bessie Smith and the Emerging Urban South. University of Illinois Press, 2008.
     
    If you want to support Deviant Women, follow us on: 
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    • 1 hr 13 min
    Marie Laveau

    Marie Laveau

    In the melting pot of 19th century New Orleans, one woman emerged as the most powerful and legendary practitioners of Louisiana Voodoo. From her humble beginnings as the daughter of a free-man and his Voodoo doctor mistress, Laveau grew up to become a priestess, a healer, an activist and a commanding and influential leader of her community. But Laveau's story is as much legend as it is reality, and even in her lifetime stories proliferated about her midnight graveyard ceremonies, animal sacrifices and mesmerising evil incantations.


    So how, in a story like this, do we tell the difference between history and myth? And who do we believe when we listen to her story? Join us for our Season Four premier as we pick apart the complex and fascinating life of the Voodoo Queen of New Orleans, Marie Laveau!


    Fandrich, Ina Johanna. The Mysterious Voodoo Queen, Marie Laveaux : a Study of Powerful Female Leadership in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans. Routledge, 2016. 
    Long, Carolyn Morrow. "Perceptions of New Orleans Voodoo: Sin, Fraud, Entertainment, and Religion." Nova Religio: The Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions 6.1 (2002): 86-101.
    Ward, Martha. Voodoo Queen The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau. University Press of Mississippi, 2004. 
    Hurston, Zora. “Hoodoo in America.” Journal of American Folklore, 44. 171 (1931): pp. 317-417. 


    If you want to support Deviant Women, follow us on: 
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    Instagram @deviantwomenpodcast For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 1 hr 24 min
    Season 4 Trailer

    Season 4 Trailer

    It’s 2020, and on February 27 Deviant Women are back for season four, bringing you more hags and enchantresses, more gender-queering lady-lovers, more gin-swirling, party-loving bohemians, and more brilliant muses and killer queens.
     
    This isn’t just a podcast that celebrates the heroism of forgotten women of the past: Deviant Women isn’t afraid to get down and dirty with the good, the bad, and everything in between, unpicking the blurry zigzag of history and myth and the downright messy and misunderstood stories of femininity we’ve been telling ourselves for centuries.
     
    So join Deviant Women on February 27 as they launch another season dedicated to unravelling the stories of those who double, double toiled and troubled, who fought and duelled and died in glorious ruin, and who didn’t write the rules, but smashed them. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 50 sec

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
93 Ratings

93 Ratings

charlieroseweterkamp ,

Love it, envy their knowledge

These girls are so entertaining and relatable. They tell important stories of forgotten women from all aspects of history. Love them and would like to steal there minds.❤️

tabouriechick ,

Your voices

Good gracious, I could only listen for about two minutes, talk about over excited high voices! Hated it. Calm down girls

@steph__paige ,

The best!

These ladies are the absolute best - the fascinating stories they tell, the chemistry between the hosts, all of it! I’m always waiting on the next episode to come out. Each episode actually teaches you about something and someone you likely didn’t know, so entertainment + learning = win!

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