52 min

Episode 9 - Young Australians The Long View

    • Politics

COVID-19 may have been especially dangerous to older people, but the COVID-19 recession will be especially harmful to the young. The industries most affected by the shutdown are dominated by young workers, many of whom are casually employed, and the ongoing impacts of a recession will be felt by this generation for years to come. But why were Australia's young people in such a precarious position in the first place?

This week on The Long View, Clare chats to three young women about the challenges facing young Australians in 2020: Shara Teo, an organiser and advocate with the United Workers Union; Tiana Sixsmith, a co-facilitator of YACVic's submission into the Royal Commission into Victoria's Mental Health System, who is from a regional background herself; and Nuriyah Haque, the Victorian State Director for Oaktree, and a member of this first group of Australians to graduate into a recession in almost 30 years.

Young people were already experiencing high rates of un- and underemployment, and they faced major difficulties getting a foothold in today's workforce, even before COVID struck. Mental health issues are more commonplace than any generation before them, and young people are becoming less engaged in the political process, with successive governments failing to address their concerns.

Why is it so difficult to get a decent start in today's workforce? Why are so many young people in insecure work? What is it that they want government to be doing to get things back on track for young people? And how do they feel about all that debt?

Please leave us a review, let us know what you think, and subscribe to stay up to date with the series.

You can also follow Clare and join the conversation on social media:
Twitter: twitter.com/clareoneilmp
Instagram: instagram.com/clareoneilmp
Facebook: facebook.com/clareforhotham

COVID-19 may have been especially dangerous to older people, but the COVID-19 recession will be especially harmful to the young. The industries most affected by the shutdown are dominated by young workers, many of whom are casually employed, and the ongoing impacts of a recession will be felt by this generation for years to come. But why were Australia's young people in such a precarious position in the first place?

This week on The Long View, Clare chats to three young women about the challenges facing young Australians in 2020: Shara Teo, an organiser and advocate with the United Workers Union; Tiana Sixsmith, a co-facilitator of YACVic's submission into the Royal Commission into Victoria's Mental Health System, who is from a regional background herself; and Nuriyah Haque, the Victorian State Director for Oaktree, and a member of this first group of Australians to graduate into a recession in almost 30 years.

Young people were already experiencing high rates of un- and underemployment, and they faced major difficulties getting a foothold in today's workforce, even before COVID struck. Mental health issues are more commonplace than any generation before them, and young people are becoming less engaged in the political process, with successive governments failing to address their concerns.

Why is it so difficult to get a decent start in today's workforce? Why are so many young people in insecure work? What is it that they want government to be doing to get things back on track for young people? And how do they feel about all that debt?

Please leave us a review, let us know what you think, and subscribe to stay up to date with the series.

You can also follow Clare and join the conversation on social media:
Twitter: twitter.com/clareoneilmp
Instagram: instagram.com/clareoneilmp
Facebook: facebook.com/clareforhotham

52 min

Top Podcasts In Politics