15 episodes

The Anzac involvement in the Gallipoli Campaign has had a lasting cultural impact in Australia. Why is it considered such sacred ground? These podcasts will draw together different perspectives on Gallipoli, the ANZACs and the Great War.

Gallipoli and the Great War La Trobe University

    • Society & Culture

The Anzac involvement in the Gallipoli Campaign has had a lasting cultural impact in Australia. Why is it considered such sacred ground? These podcasts will draw together different perspectives on Gallipoli, the ANZACs and the Great War.

    #15 Gallipoli in Film

    #15 Gallipoli in Film

    Sarah Midford (Mediterranean Studies, La Trobe University) on the legacy of the Gallipoli campaign, and the fine line between commemoration and celebration.

    Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli

    Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.

    • 10 min
    #14 Commemoration of Gallipoli

    #14 Commemoration of Gallipoli

    Sarah Midford (Mediterranean Studies, La Trobe University) on the legacy of the Gallipoli campaign, and the fine line between commemoration and celebration.

    Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli

    Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.

    • 21 min
    #13 The Gallipoli Campaign

    #13 The Gallipoli Campaign

    Professor Robin Prior (History, Flinders University) on the Gallipoli campaign, Australia’s contribution on the battlefield, and the growth of myth.

    Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli

    Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.

    • 19 min
    #12 Life on the Gallipoli Battlefield

    #12 Life on the Gallipoli Battlefield

    Dr Michelle Negus-Cleary (Mediterranean Studies, La Trobe University) on life on the Gallipoli battlefield and the conditions the soldiers were living with, such as poor food and supplies, illness and traumatic stress.

    Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli

    Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.

    • 19 min
    #11 Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    #11 Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    Dr Bart Ziino (History, Deakin University) on the concept of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and how they represent the fallen of World War I who never returned.

    Gallipoli and the Great War is a fully online subject at La Trobe University. You can enrol or find out more at: www.latrobe.edu.au/gallipoli

    Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.

    • 10 min
    #10 Australian Nurses in World War I

    #10 Australian Nurses in World War I

    Dr Janet Butler (History, La Trobe University) talks about the Australian women who went to the frontlines in World War I and supported their men in their time of need.

    Copyright 2015 La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.

    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

Chuk Norris Fan ,

What myth?

Sorry but there’s no myth about Gallipoli and the Anzacs. Since I was in primary school in the 1970’s we learned that Australians and New Zealanders landed at Gallipoli as part of an allied military operation that started on April 25th 1915. We also learned that living conditions and the fighting were very difficult and that within this context the Anzacs displayed courage, mateship and sacrifice.

This is what the legend of Anzac was based on - no one ever told us that the Anzacs were 7 feet tall or that they weren’t afraid before battles. And obviously we always knew that the operation was a military failure so obviously the Anzacs were not invincible. So sorry Professor the myth you are seeking to debunk never actually existed.

I never heard it said that Gallipoli was only about the Anzacs, but we simply learned more about them because we come from Australia. This doesn’t create a myth it’s simply retelling history that is more relavant to our nations history and culture.

These podcasts are just another example of academics trying to find relevance in today’s world by inventing ideas such as the “myth of Anzac” and writing and speaking to debunk them so that they get published in an academic journal.

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