7 episodes

Hear from guest speakers, scholars and academics hosted by Bond University’s Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. The Faculty, consisting of a variety of disciplines including Communication, Film and Television, Journalism, Social Sciences, International Relations and other humanities subjects has over its twenty-three years of existence, brought together an emphasis on the applied and vocational, and truly academic inquiry.

Humanities and Social Sciences Bond University

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Hear from guest speakers, scholars and academics hosted by Bond University’s Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. The Faculty, consisting of a variety of disciplines including Communication, Film and Television, Journalism, Social Sciences, International Relations and other humanities subjects has over its twenty-three years of existence, brought together an emphasis on the applied and vocational, and truly academic inquiry.

    • video
    Platonic Love

    Platonic Love

    The first comprehensive discussion of love in Western literature was provided by Plato, who using the Greek word eros, left us a book called the Symposium, which featured a number of speakers at a drinking party, each of whom gave a speech about the nature of love. Plato seems to say that love starts as a sexual passion and that it gradually transforms itself into a union in beauty, or to quote him in “the vast ocean of the beautiful". The term Platonic Love was never used by him, but was coined by a Platonist almost 2000 years later, Ficino. Unlike eros in Plato, Platonic Love is asexual, but equally involves the idea that the object of love is some kind of mystery. Its purpose is in the end a negation of eros.

    • 40 min
    • video
    National Narcissism

    National Narcissism

    Narcissism has a definition in modern psychology, but also a long history in the culture of the West. This address goes back to the deep roots of the Western understanding of narcissism, looks at the myth itself and the poem of Ovid, the commentary of Plato, and modern philosophical vestiges of the ancient western fable. The paper takes the vantage point of Plato in that narcissism is said to involve the preoccupation with one's reflection in the eyes of other people, and posits the view that narcissism is not only limited to individuals. Preoccupation with one's image is a characteristic of nations as well. This address will be published in written form in a Bond University Press book shortly to appear, edited by Jonathan Ping, Constructivism in the Twenty-First Century.

    • 49 min
    • video
    Reflections on the Atomic Age

    Reflections on the Atomic Age

    The awe-struck men who stood in the New Mexico desert on July 16, 1945, were reduced to introspection by the enormous mushroom cloud that filled the sky. Most of them recognized they had witnessed a turning point in the history of human civilization, for they had let the nuclear genie out of the bottle with little likelihood of putting it back. They had built an atomic bomb with the hope of ending a war, but reaped history's unintended consequences. More than any other weapon humankind had yet unleashed, nuclear weapons were designed not to target just military forces but urban-industrial centres as well. Because they could protect as they threatened the very essence of life on earth, past nuclear weapons strategies often appeared bizarre as any use projected global devastation. Since 1945 critics of the bomb have expressed alarm that the spread of nuclear weapons will inevitably lead to worldwide destruction. So far, that prediction has not been proved right, but is that due, borrowing a phrase from former secretary of state Dean Acheson after the Cuban Missile Crisis, to just plain dumb luck? Or is it, due to the growing realization that nuclear weapons possessed inherently limited political and military utility, therefore, abstaining from their use was the only sane policy?
    The nine current members of the nuclear weapon club - the U.S., Russia, Great Britain, France, China, Israel, India, Pakistan, and North Korea - today possess thousands of operational nuclear weapons of various types among them. Additionally, at least another 15 countries have on hand enough highly enriched uranium for a nuclear weapon. But the question remains: What does a nation do with the bomb once it has it? It is a question all members of the nuclear club have confronted at one time or another. Most national nuclear weapons programs thus far have had as their objective simply having the bomb, not using it. Why divert so much in the way of national resources to developing a weapon that is politically limited and theoretically self-deterring? Security and prestige are the most frequently cited justifications for national nuclear ambitions but neither of those ends is served by actual use. In fact, during the post-Nagasaki era, the bomb acquired such a political or moral stigma that security and prestige would likely be rapidly undone for any nation that broke the nuclear taboo and actually used an atomic or nuclear weapon against an adversary. But how long will this taboo govern the use of nuclear weaponry?

    • 29 min
    • video
    Inside Psychology

    Inside Psychology

    Thinking of studying Psychology? A group of talented Bond alumni share their experiences in an ‘on the couch’ style quiz, query and question session. They provide valuable insider knowledge and advice on how to kick start your Psychology career. The alumni guests include Dr Sarah Walker, a Clinical Specialist in eating disorders, Vanessa Basch and Courtney Joy from Queensland Health, Lisa Appleby who is a Foster Care Worker at Mercy Family Services and Brendan Evans who is an experienced psychologist at the Hart Centre.

    • 1 hr 11 min
    • video
    Re-imagining the Gold Coast

    Re-imagining the Gold Coast

    A panel of experts take us on a journey into the cultural underground of the Gold Coast, exploring issues that have formed the stereotypes and discovering a much deeper side to the coast beyond the ‘Glitter Strip'

    • 59 min
    • video
    Bruce and Denise Morcombe

    Bruce and Denise Morcombe

    In the case of victimology there are often forgotten survivors who are also victims. Bruce and Denise Morcombe answer questions about their experiences.

    • 46 min

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