100 episodes

Welcome to our podcast series from the Journal of Biophilic Design, where we interview workplace consultants, futurists, interior designers, architects, urban planners and those working in healthcare, wellbeing and other industries to find out the latest on Biophilic Design. www.journalofbiophilicdesign.com

Journal of Biophilic Design Vanessa Champion, editor, Journal of Biophilic Design

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Welcome to our podcast series from the Journal of Biophilic Design, where we interview workplace consultants, futurists, interior designers, architects, urban planners and those working in healthcare, wellbeing and other industries to find out the latest on Biophilic Design. www.journalofbiophilicdesign.com

    Sustainable Interior Design

    Sustainable Interior Design

    Have you got a copy of the Journal? You can purchase a copy directly from us at the journalofbiophilicdesign.com or Amazon. If you like our podcast and would like to support us in some way, you can buy us a coffee if you’d like to, thank you x

    Credits: with thanks to George Harvey Audio Production for the calming biophilic soundscape that backs all our podcasts.

    Did you know our podcast is also on Audible, Amazon Music, Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, Stitcher, vurbl, podbay, podtail, and most if not all the RSS feeds?

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    • 58 min
    Natural Dimensions - Transforming Schools with Biophilic Design

    Natural Dimensions - Transforming Schools with Biophilic Design

    There is strong evidence that strong green environments can improve educational outcomes as well as improving focus and concentration restoration levels, and for Nicholas Artherton, a chartered Landscape Architect and qualified Urban designer, Biophilic Design is a core tenet to create connections with natural elements and outdoor spaces through diversity, movement and multi-sensory interactions.
    Nick is founder of Natural Dimensions, a multi-award-winning landscape architecture and urban design practice. For Nick, Biophilic Design is: “a way of incorporating into design a balance of ecological planning and planning for mental well-being and responding to systems which encourage human health.”
    One of Nick’s most celebrated designs was for Merstham Park School where, Natural Dimensions were appointed to design extensive ground around a ground-breaking new pathfinder secondary school that is a template for low carbon technology and biophilic landscape principles.
    From the entrance to the school and throughout the grounds, Natural Dimensions created a beautiful space with varied spaces incorporating many different habitats, spaces and an overall feeling of the school sitting within nature.
    With a rich variety of planting, and so much thought gone into choosing a mix of species that change throughout the seasons, the school is nestled in a beautiful “hug” of colour, shapes and biodiversity. But not only is the landscape beautiful, with the deciduous trees, it maximises solar heating in winter and solar cooling in summer. Nick has also optimised the use and preservation of rainwater through some clever tech under the permeable pathways and planting areas which is then used for irrigation and recycling it for toilet flushing.
    Nick shares his passion for increasing the awareness of Biophilic Design and believes it should be adopted as the de facto approach to design. In fact, he explains that he can't think of a better location into which to bring biophilic design than schools. With kids being super aware of environmental issues, Nick believes there is no better place for them to be really engaged in really well-designed schools, which represent those values for them, and encourage them to engage with environmental stewardship.
    His view is that if you are advocating for responsible behaviour towards climate issues, and also mental well-being, it makes complete sense for schools to be the locations for that advocacy. He believes that they can act as community hubs because they are representatives of spaces where there is a focus for environmental stewardship, and that could reach out to the rest of the community.
    Nick’s personal mission is to enable landscape architecture and urban design to be at the heart of development, with the many benefits it brings for all, including an increasingly important positive ecological impact. Natural Dimensions aims to help companies, organisations, communities and individuals reap the rewards of design in the form of landscape aesthetics and features, natural systems, environmental enhancement and the wellbeing of citizens.
    With every design, new build, school refit or refurb we have a choice to make, and I think that Nick’s passion for creating well thought out, meaningful spaces and enlightened planning through the adoption of Biophilic Design prove that we can transform public sector design.

    • 35 min
    Tall Timber Buildings - are they the Future of our Urban Landscape?

    Tall Timber Buildings - are they the Future of our Urban Landscape?

    Andrew Waugh is an architect with a passion for using sustainable materials in construction projects. His practice, Waugh Thistleton Architects, is a London based architectural practice producing thoughtful and sustainable projects both locally and internationally.
    The practice is a world leader in engineered timber and pioneer in the field of tall timber buildings. Of particular renown is the Black & White building in London that has been short listed for a RIBA London Award in 2024. The build was described by RIBA journal as 'a major step forward for the development and construction industry’ and is the tallest engineered timber office building in central London.
    In 2023, Waugh Thistleton were named Architect of the Year in AJ Architecture Awards 2023. The Architect's Journal recognised the practise for their long standing advocacy for timber saying that 'In the face of the climate crisis, Waugh Thistleton is a worthy winner for its ability to work within the constraints of very challenging policy yet create cutting-edge, sustainable architecture. Not only that, it is also prompting the whole industry to raise its game.’
    In this podcast, Andrew explains the different types of engineered timber and how some have superior structural strength while others have the mass required to offer superior acoustic performance. The choice of materials, as he outlines, is determined by usefulness, cost and how they fit into an overall objective of using as few materials as possible.
    !

    Andrew’s passion for the use of sustainable materials shines through as he explains how the wood used is sourced from forests planted with biodiversity in mind. The forests are not monoculture forests, they are planted with FSC of PEFC licences, and the harvest used for producing construction materials is a long way short of the overall capacity of the forests to produce sustainable timber.
    From a biophilic design perspective, Andew details some of the many health and well-being benefits of using wood in the built environment. The better acoustics, the hydroscopic nature of wood creating better air quality and the calming properties of sawn timber are among the benefits discussed. He also describes how the external wood design, creates Solar shading on the building which reduces energy use for heating and cooling by about a third.
    Talking of the Black and White building, Andrew says:
    “IIt is important for us to ensure that this move towards low carbon construction, low carbon architecture is not a peripheral occupation. It is not just for birdwatching centres, and National Trust museums, it has to be mainstream. The entire building, which was built for a commercial company, Blackstone, is above the ground floor slab made of timber. So, it's timber staircases, timber, lift shafts, timber beams, columns, floor slabs, external wall curtain walling is timber, and the external cladding is timber as well. A completely timber building. It was built very quickly in 83 weeks. So very fast construction. It was cost equivalent to concrete. We were obliged to track the cost of the building all the way to tender with the main contractor against a concrete equivalent building and we were able to demonstrate that it was cost equivalent.
    So fast, inexpensive, and letting extremely well - the client’s very happy, which is really nice.”
    Each piece of timber has a QR code, so it can be placed exactly into place. So it’s not only fast but also quiet and clean. Put that against the usual cement trucks and building site cacophony. In fact the whole building took only 70 deliveries
    The overriding message from Andrew’s advocacy of sustainable building, using the example of the Black and White building, is that using these technologies and approaches is a positive advance in construction with myriad benefits. It is no longer necessary to wear a metaphorical hair shirt to build in a way that is sympathetic to the environment. Fast, quiet and quick constr

    NEW proof that Biophilic Design increases the Value (£) of the Workplace!

    NEW proof that Biophilic Design increases the Value (£) of the Workplace!

    Did you know for every £1 you spend on even simple Biophilic Design enhancements, you could get £2.70 back? So reveals the new research conducted by Joyce Chan Shoof Architect and Sustainability Lead at the UK Parliament.
    Using a scientific approach with control environments, adding biophilic design elements to test the effect and then removing them to further test the effect of their absence, Joyce explains the rigorous approach she took over a seven-year period to arrive at her conclusion.
    This is a phenomenal breakthrough for those of us working in Biophilic Design.
    You can read the whole report here: https://plplabs.com/reap-what-you-sow-2/
    And come and see Joyce present the research in person at Workplace Trends in London on the 18th April 2024 https://workplacetrends.co/events/wtrs24-prog/
    We often have struggled trying to articulate the economic benefits of Biophilic Design, this research can be used to support arguments why businesses need it in the workplace.
    Joyce has also developed a framework to help designers work out what we need and the impact it will have. Using existing frameworks, like the Flourish model (as advocated by Professor Derek Clements Croome) and others, she has woven a great new model we can all hang our designs on.
    From a career as a practicing architect, Joyce explains that transferring to the client side within the Parliamentary Estate has been transformational in the way she sees building design from feasibility study through to construction. The change and the opportunity it gave her has inspired her to incorporate multidisciplinary approaches and to study the impact of taking a biophilic design on efficiency, productivity and well-being within the workplace.
    Just like Goldilocks and the Three Bears, one interesting outcome that she highlights during the podcast, the study concludes that an immersive approach to incorporating Biophilic Design in the workplace is less effective overall than a more measured approach. But she explains that the immersive effect was preferred by people. The results showed that the moderate Biophilic Design intervention (that which we could normally advocate) seems to be the best.
    Joyce sees academic rigour as an important part of her role when leading a complex development. Since 2017, she has been conducting this doctoral research with the Design School at Loughborough University, focused on Sustainable Well-being in the workplace with a particular interest in biophilic and social value. She is a keen advocate of how Architects can make positive impacts towards allowing people to live happier and healthier. Her team sits within the Design Authority who are a group of design professionals and specialists who are managing the estate in Westminster, and their objective is to inject new thinking into the adaptive use of new and heritage buildings within the Parliamentary Estate – a UNESCO site.
    Parliament’s vision is amibitious; it aims to set an example to lead the early adoption of Zero Carbon (Scope 1, 2 & 3), Healthy Buildings, Social Value and Circular Economy through our own refurbishment projects and procurement. The team manages the design, construction and operations of the Parliamentary Estate of 20 buildings including the Palace of Westminster.


    Joyce discusses her study of the economic benefits of incorporating a biophilic design approach to workspace and gives many insights into her approach and into how she found a way of attributing economic value to the benefits.
    Her wish is that we reconnect with nature, the sources of food, the feeling of being part of nature rather than living lives that separate us from the natural world. She wishes that all of us benefit from an improved environment, and her research is a massive and welcome step in that direction.
    To register for Workplace Trends and meet Joyce in person on the 18th of April 2024: https://workplacetrends.co/events/wtrs24-prog/
    Reap What You Sow: What’s the value (£) of

    • 50 min
    Creating Eden

    Creating Eden

    The UK is one of the most nature-depleted countries and this fact is yet another reason we need more Biophilic Design included into urban planning, architecture, design, and every environmental facet of city and town life.

    Robert Delius, Associate Director, Architect and Head of Sustainability at Stride Treglown is doing just that. Aiming to maximise biodiversity through design, Robert has a passion to create an Eden, where buildings and landscapes come together and there's a feeling of abundance, where there's nature and birdsong and insect life and a powerful sense of well-being.

    Robert’s background in housing design and master planning has set him up in good stead to create good design and great places. Distinctiveness and place making are a thread through his career. He also has a particular interest in regenerative design and how great design can have a measurably positive impact on climate, ecology and people. In short, he is a brilliantly creative proactive advocate for Biophilic Design.

    He believes that forging a closer connection to the natural world, is extremely good for our well-being as well as being good for the planet and good for nature, and his passion for Biophilic Design is life-long. One of the projects he discusses is his Great Bow Yard project in Somerset from 2008. This had gained media attention because it had been flagged as the most energy efficient scheme in the UK. Having recently revisited the project, Robert notes that residents, are not only pleased with the low energy costs, but were actually most enthused by the shared garden and the feelings of well-being that stem from it being a beautiful spot.

    In this podcast, Robert talks of his background and upbringing and how that has led him to his passion for living in harmony with nature. He discusses how on his projects, and those of his colleagues, he always looks to introduce as many opportunities as possible for planting in designs, both internally and externally to reduce hard space and introduce a softer more natural element.

    This passion is carried through to the present day. As we said at the beginning, Robert is concerned to note that the UK is the most one of the most nature depleted countries in the world and this fact has inspired him, and others, to create a public event “Code Red for Nature” (link below), a funeral for nature in Bath on 20th April 2024. The event is open to all, even Chris Packham will be there supporting and Dan Pearson design studio will also be taking part.

    Great Bow Yard: https://stridetreglown.com/projects/great-bow-yard/

    Code Red: https://www.coderedfornature.uk/
    2pm on Saturday 20th April 2024 in Bath, TAKE PART IN ONE OF THE MOST POWERFUL AND AMBITIOUS PIECES OF STREET THEATRE YET TO BE ENACTED ON BEHALF OF BIODIVERSITY LOSS

    If you like this, please subscribe!

    Please register for our newsletter on our website https://journalofbiophilicdesign.com/podcasts-journal-of-biophilic-design

    Credits: with thanks to George Harvey Audio Production for the calming biophilic soundscape that backs all our podcasts.
    Did you know our podcast is also on Audible, Amazon Music, Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, Stitcher, vurbl, podbay, podtail, and most if not all the RSS feeds?
    Facebook https://www.facebook.com/journalofbiophilicdesign/
    Twitter https://twitter.com/JofBiophilicDsn
    LinkedIn. https://www.linkedin.com/company/journalofbiophilicdesign/
    Instagram https://www.instagram.com/journalofbiophilicdesign

    • 35 min
    Rebalance Earth - Enabling a world worth living in

    Rebalance Earth - Enabling a world worth living in

    Robert Gardner is CEO and Co-Founder of Rebalance Earth. With over 20 years of experience in the financial industry, he has a unique expertise in sustainability, pensions, and wealth management and believes that money can be a force for good.
    Rebalance Earth, is a fund manager that redirects the flow of private capital to protect and restore Nature. Their mission is to drive the transition to a nature-based economy by enabling the flow of private capital to protect and restore nature. Rebalance Earth achieves this by creating opportunities for investors to achieve sustainable financial returns from projects to restore Nature.
    Robert is passionate about the idea of “natural capital”. He believes that investment in the environment shouldn’t simply be about climate change but should take a broader approach. He sees a future in which biophilia is prominent and discussion of environment-conscious investment should include reduced biodiversity loss, rewilding, and all aspects of being in tune with nature.
    Robert sees nature as the most valuable asset class on the planet. It provides everything from clean air to carbon capture and biodiversity; not forgetting that a balanced ecosystem is essential to create pollination and soil fertility for our food.
    The investment community currently operates an extractive financial model that has been using all of nature's resources for free, not valuing them and, worse than that, destroying them. Rebalance Earth is taking steps to build and propagate a more sustainable, biophilic approach.
    In this podcast, Robert talks about how he studied Geography at university and how his passions are hydrography and glaciology. He notes with sadness that a glacier he worked on as part of the Alpine Glacier Project during his studies is now gone. He sees glaciers as the canary in the coalmine of climate change and nature loss but sees the good news as being that this can be turned around with money used as a force for good.
    Robert explains how his background, growing up in Holland and travelling all over the world with his parents led to his interest in geography and how is career in finance and 25 years of learning how money flows around the world has led him to establishing Rebalance Earth. He says that there is no point having a great pension if we have no coral reefs, rivers are filthy, there are no fish, and the air is polluted. There’s nothing to enjoy!
    He sets out his idea that nature should be valued. He explains that assets have utility, scarcity and cashflow in order to be valued. He gives us the example of the humble bee and how it has been estimated that it would cost £1.8bn to pollinate crops if the bee were to disappear. Using this and other examples Robert observes that the concept of valuing nature is currently an intangible and how by making the intangible tangible, people will value nature and therefore will look after it. Because people look after things they value.
    The five key problems that Robert sees in the UK are: Flooding, Drought, Water Quality, Biodiversity and Carbon. He goes on to detail how each of these problems represent significant opportunities for companies to make a return. The essence is the idea that companies can charge customers for reducing the customers’ risks across these areas.
    He is excited by his dream that pension funds allocate 2% of their capital to invest in nature (enough to bridge the nature deficit), companies start paying for services to reduce risks from the five problem areas and the UK becomes a place worth living in.
    It would be amazing if we all look at the successful ideas around the world, which Robert shares with us in the podcast, and see how they work, so we really see the value of investing in Nature. For instance, nature-based towns and cities, a countryside with nature back in it and a farming system that has nature at the heart of it. Once people see that it works they will do more.

    Rebalance Earth: https://www.re

    • 46 min

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