106 episodes

Advanced English classes. Learning English by audio is for advanced English language learners and fluent English speakers. Beginners classes are here https://eattmag.com/learn-english/
This English by audio podcast can help you test your memory if you are a fluent English speaker.
If English is your second language, you can test how much English you understand if you are a proficient English user or IELTS 7-8 TOEFL iBT 94-109 TOEIC 901+ CAMBRIDGE CPE these classes can help you listening skills .
Learning English by audio is to practice your conversational listening and comprehension.
Contact us if you would like to buy a copy of the transcript for any podcast that is not included or buy a translation in your language to help you learn faster.

Learning English by audio for advanced English language learners is brought to you by EATT Magazine.
EATT Well, Drink, Dine, and Travel often with your host Cullen. The EATT Magazine Travel Podcast at eattmag.com is a recent winner of the Australian podcast awards most popular vote in Lifestyle, Health & Wellness.

Learn English by Audio with EATT Magazine at eattmag.co‪m‬ Cullen Pope

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    • 4.9 • 15 Ratings

Advanced English classes. Learning English by audio is for advanced English language learners and fluent English speakers. Beginners classes are here https://eattmag.com/learn-english/
This English by audio podcast can help you test your memory if you are a fluent English speaker.
If English is your second language, you can test how much English you understand if you are a proficient English user or IELTS 7-8 TOEFL iBT 94-109 TOEIC 901+ CAMBRIDGE CPE these classes can help you listening skills .
Learning English by audio is to practice your conversational listening and comprehension.
Contact us if you would like to buy a copy of the transcript for any podcast that is not included or buy a translation in your language to help you learn faster.

Learning English by audio for advanced English language learners is brought to you by EATT Magazine.
EATT Well, Drink, Dine, and Travel often with your host Cullen. The EATT Magazine Travel Podcast at eattmag.com is a recent winner of the Australian podcast awards most popular vote in Lifestyle, Health & Wellness.

    Sydney Royal Botanic Gardens Podcast Part 3

    Sydney Royal Botanic Gardens Podcast Part 3

    Branching out into the gardens with Paul we continue our conversation from part 1

    https://eattmag.com/join-us-in-part-one-of-our-tour-of-the-royal-botanic-garden-sydney/ 
    Where we began our tour standing on the original footprint of the 1816 Botanic gardens a small section of what was known as the Governor’s domain to start this botanic garden. 
    From there in part 2 https://eattmag.com/part-two-of-the-sydney-royal-botanic-gardens-podcast/
    We hear how recently, archaeologists discovered a grinding stone from a place called Cuddie Springs, and that grinding stone had starch grains from kangaroo grass that was 32,000 years old.
    How Vines introduced into the Colony of New South Wales.

    Now in the Sydney Royal Botanic Gardens Podcast Part 3 we learn of how Vines introduced into the Colony of New South Wales by James Busby Esq.
    After a most delicious European tour in 1832 sent back on the Lady Harewood in 1832, an extensive collection of over 500 vine cuttings selected from the different vineyards of France.
     
    The experimental garden 
    Charles Fraser and another early botanist, Alan Cunningham brought back seed and even seedlings of these trees and planted them in the experimental garden among others between 1824 and 1828. Looking to see how these trees would perform and how they could be used as timber trees. 
     
    Cedar 
    Red Cedar grew well and become one of the most valuable commodities coming out of the Australian colonies. 
    So well in fact Red Cedar can be found in many old town halls or in old buildings, both here but also in places like Manchester and London, and also in places in India.
     
    Into the Palm house
     
    Charles Moore whom was born in 1820, in Dundee Scotland. 
    Had arrived in Sydney on 14 January 1848 and took up the position of Director of the Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney, a position he held until 5 May 1896.
    Where he had decided to start planting the palms out in the old experimental gardening 1862, and where we still have some of those original plantings. 
     
    Fern mania, had also started at a similar time among the Victorians as a kind of obsession like that of the great fondness for palms as well. 
    Find out more about Ferns at the Plant species in the woodland page on the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney website 
    https://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/Science/Our-work-discoveries/Natural-Areas-Management/Ecology-of-Cumberland-Plain-Woodland/Plant-species-in-the-woodland/Vascular-plants/Ferns
     
    And discover the work that goes into maintaining the Gardens and learn from horticulture staff, taking direction from the team.
    Upcoming events include visits to the Australian Botanic Garden Mt Annan
    and Blue Mountains Botanic Garden Mt Tomah
    https://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/whatson

    Please answer the questions here 
    https://forms.gle/DjWFWUKSmD4dELoFA
    if you cannot see a form below  
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    • 10 min
    Part two of the Sydney Royal Botanic Gardens podcast

    Part two of the Sydney Royal Botanic Gardens podcast

    During the second part of our tour we learn how Aboriginal people had been managing the landscape for more than 40,000 years.
    Paul hunts out one of the many grasses at the botanic gardens known as the kangaroo grass. 

    One of the many birds having breakfast during our tour.
    He explains enthusiastically that, kangaroo grass has a seed and that seed's been traditionally used and ground up to make a flour to make bread. 

    And now, recently, archaeologists discovered a grinding stone from a place called Cuddie Springs, and that grinding stone had starch grains from kangaroo grass that was 32,000 years old, which makes Aboriginal people the oldest continuous bread making culture on the planet by 15,000 years.
    As we walk through the garden we find ourselves surrounded by plants brought out by the first fleet, and we have tobacco and mulberries and citrus and then directly opposite is that kangaroo grass just coming into seed at the moment. 
    We quickly learn that when first fleet arrived it was during an El Nino year.  

    El Niño is a climate cycle in the Pacific Ocean with a global impact on various weather patterns. 
    The cycle begins when warm water in the western tropical Pacific Ocean shifts and moves eastward along the equator towards the coast of South America. 
     
    Normally, this warm water pools near Indonesia and the Philippines.
    This can lead to Reduced rainfall.
    The shift in rainfall away from the western Pacific, associated with El Niño, means that Australian rainfall is usually reduced through winter–spring, particularly across the eastern and northern parts of the continent. Nine of the ten driest winter–spring periods on record for eastern Australia occurred during El Niño years.
    Learn more about what is El Niño and what might it mean for Australia?
    http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/updates/articles/a008-el-nino-and-australia.shtml 
     
    So, when the first fleet arrived it was a very dry period of time.
    And also the soils here are very ancient and very low in nutrients, and the land proved difficult to clear. 
    They ended up sowing crops between fallen trees and stumps. Due to  the low soil nutrition and because of the lack of water, the crop really failed, and they harvested less than they sowed.
    And after these various experiments they found better land on the Hawkesbury River, the Parramatta river and the Hunter river, that agriculture really took off on the continent.
    Many Scottish people also really built this garden between 1816 and the beginning of the 20th century.

    So in this case though, this is a man whose name was Joseph Gerald and Joseph. 
    Gerald was transported as a convict, and he was convicted essentially of political crimes. He was campaigning for more democratic freedoms for the people of Scotland.
    And not coincidentally, the first superintendent of these gardens, the first colonial botanist was also a Scott.
    Upcoming events: : 
    Learn about the diverse history and culture of the Aboriginal people of the Sydney region with an Aboriginal guide in the heart of the city. Uncover the Royal Botanic Garden's rich Aboriginal heritage by exploring plant uses, culture, artefacts and tasting some bush foods.
    https://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/whatson/Aboriginal-Heritage-To
    Please answer the questions here https://forms.gle/5Sfc28eSXTkux5Bg7
    if you cannot see a form below  
     
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      Join us in part one of our tour of the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney https://eattmag.com/travel/
     

    • 14 min
    Join us in part one of our tour of the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney

    Join us in part one of our tour of the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney

    We begin our tour standing on the original footprint of the 1816 Botanic gardens.
    Where in 1816 Governor Macquarie and his wife carved out a small section of what was known as the Governor's domain to start this botanic garden. 

    Among the chorus of sulphur-crested cockatoo (Cacatua galerita) is a relatively large white cockatoo found in wooded habitats in Australia, Paul continues, our walk down the garden path below the parrots while looking out for a Rainbow Lorikeet.

    Rainbow Lorikeets are Australia's fruity coloured birds. Brightly coloured blue, orange, yellow and green.
    Our second stop is look back in time. And in this garden, what we're trying to do is really tell that early historical story through plants.
    So, we're surrounded by grass trees, these remarkable Australian plants with long linear leaves and tall flower spikes covered in small creamy white flowers.A significant plant to the Gadigal people.

    'Gal' means people, so the Gadigal literally means the people of Cadi. 
    The name Cadi comes from the grass tree species Xanthorrhoea, a native plant that local Aboriginal communities would make sections of spear shaft from the stems and glue together with the resin. 
    https://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/visit/things-to-see-do/aboriginal-experiences
    Across the path, we can also see some bananas, coffee, and there's tea. And they were the plants brought out by the first fleet. 
    The kind of plants brought out by the first fleet were planted on this site around July 1788.

    But where we're standing now, we're surrounded by the types of plants that grew here before European settlement.these are species of plants that we know grew here,  thanks to our ecological department that map the traditional Flora of Australia.
    Learn more about the Royal Botanic Gardens In Sydney and stay tuned for our next episode. https://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/Support
    Our tour guide is Paul Nicholson a Senior Horticulturist 
    Upcoming events: 
    The 2020 Garden Design Series, brought to you by Foundation and Friends of the Botanic Gardens will be at the Tattersalls Club Hyde Park in Sydney’s CBD.
     
    Entry fee includes drinks and canapés on arrival. Book online here or call the Foundation & Friends office on (02) 9231 8182, Monday – Friday, 9am - 5pm. Become a member and save! Click here. Please answer the questions here https://forms.gle/QjtsaWmLkijJnu3U9 
    if you cannot see a form below 
     
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    • 10 min
    Join Ross and Cullen in Part 2 of our i'm free Sydney tour

    Join Ross and Cullen in Part 2 of our i'm free Sydney tour

    Join Ross and Cullen in Part 2 of our I'm free Sydney tour 
    Listen in and read along with part 2 of our tour through Sydney with Ross and Cullen and then answer the questions below to either test your memory, your English, or both. https://forms.gle/6FBzYXe3Uh8DaQF77
    Ross:
    You can see across Hyde Park, the big some areas, cathedral. 
    Now it's the second version of it. They started one in 1821. Unfortunately, it burnt down soon afterward. So they started this one in 1868, but they didn't finish it until 16 years ago. So it's about 130 years to get it all built. They wanted it finished off for the 2000 Olympics.



    A view across to the Cathedral with animal art making its way through the park 
    looking for an Ark.
     
    Cullen:
    Thanks for joining me, Cullen here, we are about to kick off in part two about our with Ross, from www.imfree.com.au and we're making our way now towards the cathedral. 
     
    And then we're going to swing around towards Hyde Park and the Greek mythological figures. And we learn a little bit there about Sydney's early convict beginnings.
     
    And then from there, we end up in the most magnificent lookout point towards Sydney Harbour. 
    So let's jump straight into it.
     
    Ross:
    As this is all originally the edge of the township. This area was the site of the markets, but by 1898 they wanted something more formal and official for the market. 
     
    So they built this big grand Romanesque-style building, which you can see around us. The problem was the design of the building didn't work very well as a market. So right through its history, it had a number of different functions. 
    In one instance, it was proposed to be demolished entirely and replaced by car parking.
     
    And thankfully that didn't happen in 1986, a Malaysian company took control of the building, restored it to what we can say to the state. That said, there are a few interesting and odd things around the building, in particular, the clocks. 
     
    So you might have noticed one as we came in, now hiding behind the sign. There's also a similar one, same spot down the other end of the building.



    Ross:
    It shows scenes some Australian history with, but this one shows scenes from British history. 
    So if you go up onto level two on the hour every hour, you can see beheadings of King Charles the first.
    And the whole head rolls off and everything. 
    It's a bit weird. Also, on the second level in the middle is a letter from Queen Elizabeth the second to Sydneysiders, which is nice, but we haven't opened it yet, and we're not meant to open it until 2085.
    So I don't like my chances of being around to hear that one read out and she could have written anything, but I get the feeling it's still going to be pretty........, but we'll have to wait and see …….
    It was written in 1986 the idea is that it not be open for 99 years, so we get to keep waiting for me or that you can head around the corner here as we do 
    Look up at the dome above. It's really pretty.




    Ross:
    It was in this area, had our first official horse races.
    You don't find horses here anymore. 
    It's a place for people to escape from this city. Have picnics and a place for the big white birds with the big white beaks. 

    They seem to be avoiding us a little bit at the moment. 
    The Australian white ibis (Threskiornis Molucca) is a wading bird of the ibis family.
    In recent years has become an icon of popular culture, being regarded "with passion and wit,
     
    You can see someone chasing one over there, uh, for them to steal your picnic. 
    So watch out for that one. 
    It's also, for part of our out and about art festival, which is on at the moment.



    Ross:
    it's all about getting art out into the streets rather than just in museums and galleries. 
    So that's what all the photographs we just wandered by. 
    They're all photographs that are meant

    • 15 min
    Join Cullen in part one of the I’m Free Sydney’s Sight Seeing tour.

    Join Cullen in part one of the I’m Free Sydney’s Sight Seeing tour.

    Join Cullen in part one of the I'm Free Sydney's Sight Seeing tour. Check out our new memory test below for this episode 2020.
    Cullen and the team meet Ross at the beginning of an entertaining and informative tour in part one of our podcast tour through the center of Sydney.
    The I'm Free walking tour is warmly primed with the best stories, insights, and tips throughout the heart of the city. 
    Enjoying the stories on The, I'm Free Tour Sydney Covering local transport, activities, restaurants, and bars to give you a sense of place in the same way the locals like Ross and his tour team do.
    During the easy-walking 2½-3 hour tour, we uncover some of Sydney's hidden history and explore the sites of Australia's most famous city under the guiding light of our friendly tour guide. 
    The I'm Free Sydney tour guides give a series of well-crafted insights into the people, places, and events of this sun-blessed city.
    Rain, Hail, thunder or Shine, Ross's I'm Free Tours walk every day.
    Stories abound on the I'm Free Tour Sydney And with no need to book, this is the perfect place to turn up shortly after your arrival in Sydney and find your local guide in a bright green T-shirt.
    Perfect for an update on upcoming events, art, restaurants, and of course, those hidden bars and noodle shops to help you better enjoy your time in Sydney just like a local.
    Ross joins Cullen and the team this morning at Sydney's Town Hall with the opening of the tour, exploring Sydney's remarkable beginning and development.
    Some of the convict colony stories might surprise you like the opening of the tour that digs deep beneath your feet of Sydney's Town Hall, revealing some of its hidden stories beneath the stonework.
    Tours start out at 10:30 am and 2:30 pm every day from the Sydney Town Hall Square.
    With no need to book, you'll easily find your guide wearing a bright green "I'm Free" T-shirt on George St between Sydney Town Hall and St Andrew's Cathedral.
    One of the many places visited on the I'm Free Tour in Sydney Group bookings can be made at least 24 hours in advance  Groups of 10 or more can register with www.imfree.com.au at least 24 hours in advance. 
    To maintain the quality of our regularly scheduled tours, the I'm Free tour team will need to organize you a separate private tour. 
    And full terms and conditions can be found on the I'm Free Tours private tours https://www.imfree.com.au/sydney/private-tours/ web page.
    WHEELCHAIRS: The Sydney Sights tour is wheelchair friendly.
    Find out more about I'm Free tours in both Sydney and Melbourne and 
    https://www.imfree.com.au/aboutus/ and stay tuned to join us for part two of our Sydney Sights tour on the EATT Magazine podcast.
    And join us for more travel podcasts here  https://eattmag.com/travel/
     

    • 12 min
    Trees in some ways are our heart and soul

    Trees in some ways are our heart and soul

    Cullen Pope finds out more about The Internet of Things among the trees in that #mostliveablestartupcity Melbourne, Australia.
    View the images in this podcast https://eattmag.com/cullen-pope-in-the-mostliveablestartupcity/
    When I first heard about the idea of emailing trees, I must admit I did think it was a bit odd.
    The whole idea of wanting to send another email for any reason whatsoever was undoubtedly a bit strange anyway.
     
    I spend a significant amount of my time thinking about how I won’t send another email and search through a range of tools that will prevent me from doing so.
    My number one tool at the moment is using the telephone, an ancient piece of technology traditionally used to convey ideas by voice.
     
    However, at the time of writing this, I’m sure its primary function is now to send and receive emails.
    I also spend some of my time thinking about how I won't look at another email. I can't read another email, will not drat another email, or even think about another email.
     
    So what do I think of the idea of emailing a tree?.
    Or emailing anyone or anything voluntarily for any reason does seem quite strange.
     
    Then again, perhaps I could send a tree a small collection of my emails, ones that I’ve never sent, ones that I’ve dreamt of writing, the kind of emails you only think about in your wildest dreams.
     
    Or perhaps I could just send one email, one email to rule them all, that summed it all up. Somehow I could email the tree the last email.
    However, on reflection, I realize that the ultimate email wasn’t about me or what I thought about anything; it was all about the trees.
    Suddenly I’m thinking very, very deeply.
     
    What did I want to say in appreciation to any particular tree or trees within our magnificent city and suddenly I’m speechless.
     
    But then I thought, I do know some of those trees.
    So I could email them, I have met them before.
     
    When I used to smoke, I’m sure I inhaled my cigars underneath them at some point. I certainly know of at least one tree I have cried under. Then there is a whole collection of trees. I like to walk under in the autumn. There is another group of trees I like to wiz under on my bike, but what are my favorite trees? I began to wonder.
     
    My favorite trees I like the most are the ones I run to when running away from my computer.
     
    Sometimes I run to the gym, but it’s painfully obvious that that doesn’t happen too frequently. More often than not, I run into the trees. I walk through them, or I sit under them with my scrapbook and my colored pens.
     
    Scribbling away at my latest ideas on automation, podcasting potential processes, education in the 2020's and the many possible pathways taken by artists and entrepreneurs to get where they want to and how I could help at least some of them.
     
    Trees are a defining part of Melbourne.
     
    We live in the world’s most liveable city, and our parks, gardens, green spaces and tree-lined streets contribute enormously to this status. Melbourne’s urban forest is facing two significant future challenges: climate extremes and urban growth.
     
    One of the things I loved recently was when I ran into the trees after a massive storm.
     
    I noticed the banks of the river, and I could see how much rain we had recently; the rising water had flooded the river suddenly risen up the banks reaching the trees further up.
    How refreshing that must have been for those trees to get all that dust washed from the leaves. Dead limbs were blown away in the ferocity of the wind, and the roots washed by the warm water of the summer storm.
     
    Then there are the trees that I like just to watch and see the wind gently blowing through the branches and leaves for some reason.
    I have always enjoyed that, and I have always found it to be relaxing. I’m not even sure why.
     
    Perhaps when I am not lo

    • 15 min

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4.9 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

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Interesting interviews

Love listening to Cullens podcasts they are so real and interesting

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Travel Photography Tips

I really enjoyed the travel photography tips podcasts with Mike Calder from Tasmania (numbers 39 and 40). They were informative, insightful and interesting. Thanks for making the information accessible.

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Very Informative

This show brings important information about the environment, art and technology. Cullen is very empowering with all the interviews with amazing guests!

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