152 episodes

We created this podcast in recognition that there are a number of podcasts for the American “left,” but many of them focus heavily on the organizing of social democrats, progressives, and liberal democrats. Aside from that, on the left we are always fighting a war of ideas and if we do not continue to build platforms to share those ideas and the stories of their implementation from a leftist perspective, they will continue to be ignored, misrepresented, and dismissed by the capitalist media and as a result by the general public.

Our goal is to provide a platform for communists, anti-imperialists, Black Liberation movements, ancoms, left libertarians, LBGTQ activists, feminists, immigration activists, and abolitionists to discuss radical politics, radical organizing and share their visions for a better world. Our goal is to center organizers who represent and work with marginalized communities building survival programs, defense programs, political education, and counterpower.

We also plan to bring in perspectives on and from the global south to highlight anti-capitalist struggles outside the imperial core. We view solidarity with decolonization, indigenous, anti-imperialist, environmentalist, socialist, and anarchist movements across the world as necessary steps toward meaningful liberation for all people.

Too often within the imperial core we focus on our own struggles without taking the time to understand those fighting for freedom from beneath the empire’s thumb. It is important to highlight these struggles, learn what we can from them, offer solidarity, and support with action when we can. It is not enough to Fight For $15 an hour and Single-Payer within the core, while the US actively fights against the self-determination of the people of the global economically and militarily.

We recognize that except for the extremely wealthy and privileged, our fates and struggles are intrinsically connected. We hope that our podcast becomes a meaningful platform for organizers and activists fighting for social change to connect their local movements to broader movements centered around the fight to end imperialism, capitalism, racism, discrimination based on gender identity or sexuality, sexism, and ableism.

If you like our work please support us at www.patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism Millennials Are Killing Capitalism

    • News
    • 4.8 • 12 Ratings

We created this podcast in recognition that there are a number of podcasts for the American “left,” but many of them focus heavily on the organizing of social democrats, progressives, and liberal democrats. Aside from that, on the left we are always fighting a war of ideas and if we do not continue to build platforms to share those ideas and the stories of their implementation from a leftist perspective, they will continue to be ignored, misrepresented, and dismissed by the capitalist media and as a result by the general public.

Our goal is to provide a platform for communists, anti-imperialists, Black Liberation movements, ancoms, left libertarians, LBGTQ activists, feminists, immigration activists, and abolitionists to discuss radical politics, radical organizing and share their visions for a better world. Our goal is to center organizers who represent and work with marginalized communities building survival programs, defense programs, political education, and counterpower.

We also plan to bring in perspectives on and from the global south to highlight anti-capitalist struggles outside the imperial core. We view solidarity with decolonization, indigenous, anti-imperialist, environmentalist, socialist, and anarchist movements across the world as necessary steps toward meaningful liberation for all people.

Too often within the imperial core we focus on our own struggles without taking the time to understand those fighting for freedom from beneath the empire’s thumb. It is important to highlight these struggles, learn what we can from them, offer solidarity, and support with action when we can. It is not enough to Fight For $15 an hour and Single-Payer within the core, while the US actively fights against the self-determination of the people of the global economically and militarily.

We recognize that except for the extremely wealthy and privileged, our fates and struggles are intrinsically connected. We hope that our podcast becomes a meaningful platform for organizers and activists fighting for social change to connect their local movements to broader movements centered around the fight to end imperialism, capitalism, racism, discrimination based on gender identity or sexuality, sexism, and ableism.

If you like our work please support us at www.patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism

    “I Felt Like We Had Been Bamboozled In That Integrationist Moment” - Mary Helen Washington on Gwendolyn Brooks and The Other Blacklist

    “I Felt Like We Had Been Bamboozled In That Integrationist Moment” - Mary Helen Washington on Gwendolyn Brooks and The Other Blacklist

    In this episode we interview Dr. Mary Helen Washington. Mary Helen Washington is an accomplished African-American literary scholar and the editor and author of many books including Midnight Birds and Black-eyed Susans: Stories by and about Black Women, Invented Lives: Narratives of Black Women 1860-1960, Memories of Kin, and the book we focus on in this discussion on The Other Blacklist: The African-American Literary and Cultural Left of the 1950s.
    Mary Helen Washington is also a  Distinguished Professor in the English Department at the University of Maryland, College Park. She previously served as the president of the American Studies Association. Washington worked for many years developing Black Studies programs, including in Detroit where she has stated she was “part of the ground troops helping in the activities of the Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement (DRUM), an”I offshoot of the League of Revolutionary Black Workers.”
    In this conversation we specifically focus on the work of Gwendolyn Brooks prior to her joining the Black Arts Movement in the late 1960’s, within the Black cultural and literary left that Washington analyzes in The Other Blacklist. 
    Mary Helen Washington situates Brooks within this Black cultural milieu as a member of the South Side Community Art Center in Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood and as someone who was connected and had relationships to Black communists, and other communists and progressives as well as to cultural institutions and magazines of the Popular Front.
    Washington highlights Brooks' attentiveness to working class concerns and critiques of racism both interpersonally and institutionally in her writing as far back as the 1940’s. She also highlights Brooks’ work in dialogue with critiques reflected by other communist and progressive Black women of her era, including Claudia Jones, Lorraine Hansberry and Alice Childress. In doing so, Washington argues that Brooks’ work offers early blueprints for Black Left Feminism operating within her poetry, essays and her novel Maud Martha.
    The discussion is also firmly attentive to the racial politics and the anticommunism of the 1950’s, in which racially radical or progressive analyses were automatically cause for suspicion, surveillance, and potentially repression. 
    Additionally, Mary Helen Washington talks about other important figures from her book The Other Blacklist including other communist and leftwing Black figures of the 1950’s including visual artist Charles White, and authors Lloyd Brown, Alice Childress, and Frank London Brown.
    We want to thank all of the patrons who support our show. We are funded solely by our listeners and patrons. You can become a patron of the show for as little as $1 a month or 10.80 per year at patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism.
     

    • 1 hr 11 min
    “I Started Thinking Of The United States As A Weapons Company” - Matt Deitsch On Violence And Critical Reflections And Lessons From Parkland

    “I Started Thinking Of The United States As A Weapons Company” - Matt Deitsch On Violence And Critical Reflections And Lessons From Parkland

    In this episode we interview Matt Deitsch, artist, journalist, organizer and former founder and director of March For Our Lives. 
    This episode is a bit different from many of ours. Rarely have we engaged with the politics of gun control, or with an area so tightly situated and controlled within the arena of electoral politics and non profit organizing. But we felt that interviewing Matt offered a unique opportunity to examine the politics of gun control in the so-called United States, and the relationship between movements against gun violence and mass shooters and the Democratic Party, their think tanks, well funded non profit organizations and the ruling class. 
    Matt presents a specifically interesting perspective, as someone who was activated by the devastating gun violence in Parkland Florida, and politicized through the organizing efforts they and others undertook through their organization March For Our Lives. Also as someone who provides a highly critical reflection around the work they and others undertook in relation to that movement, but who also believes they learned valuable lessons for mass organizing.
    Along other things Matt talks about organizing as youth, the strengths, limitations and contradictions of that, discusses moments of dialogue with other organizers and youth, particularly ones from different class and racial backgrounds and how these relationships and discussions altered their own political viewpoint around the scope of issues of violence. As someone who has spent much of the last 4 years deeply involved in electoral organizing, Matt cautions against the amount of energy put into it and highlights some of the forces most invested in that use of organizer time and effort.
    Ultimately Matt argues for the essential work of political education, of building power outside of the electoral arena, and holding a political horizon based in anti-imperialism, abolition, and socialism. They draw out linkages of different forms of violence and highlights the bipartisan influence of the police state and the military industrial complex on the politics of gun control reform as an antidote to violence, within the politics of either dominant party.
    Just as a note, this episode was recorded prior to the new bipartisan gun legislation or the court’s recent decision around concealed carry restrictions, which would likely have had minimal impact on the discussion. It was also recorded before the courts officially gutted Roe. But there are many cautionary perspectives and suggested approaches that we think warrant consideration and are relevant to a new generation of people hopefully pushed into action by the violence of all aspects of the US state.
    Lastly just want to thank all of our patrons for your support. These are difficult times for everyone with rising costs, and our show is totally dependent upon your support. So if you like what we do and want to contribute to our work please become a patron at patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism

    • 2 hrs 9 min
    “They Know The Terror” - Dorothy Roberts on Family Policing and Abolition

    “They Know The Terror” - Dorothy Roberts on Family Policing and Abolition

    In this episode we interview Dr. Dorothy Roberts.
    Dorothy Roberts is the George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, where she directs the Penn Program on Race, Science, and Society. The author of four books, including Killing the Black Body, Fatal Invention and Shattered Bonds. She lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
    In this conversation we’re honored to host Dr. Dorothy Roberts to discussed her latest book Torn Apart: How The Child Welfare System Destroys Black Families—And How Abolition Can Build A Safer World. 
    We talk to Dr. Roberts about how family policing or the so-called child welfare system functions within a larger carceral web in the United States. She talks about the geographic zones of family policing and discusses the origins of our family policing system in slavery, settler colonialism and Elizabethan poor laws.
    Roberts discusses the deep ableism that undergirds the family policing system and talks about how family policing has been a frontline for the war on drugs. She talks about how the system overwhelmingly disrupts predominantly Black and Brown families in the US, along with those of poor white people, noting that it also criminalizes children and is in many ways indistinguishable from other parts of the prison industrial complex.
    Along the way, Dr. Roberts lifts up the many struggles of families against this system, with stories of the ways the system terrorizes families, as well as the many ways that people are organizing against the system. As we close the conversation, these examples of resistance, mutual aid and organizing provide a foundation for building a reality in which family policing is abolished and replaced by a much more powerful network of care that is more effective at preventing and resolving issues of familial violence and abuse.
    We are only able to bring you episodes like this due to the support of our listeners. You can support us at patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism for as little as $1 a month or $10.80 per year. We are down a few patrons again this month, so if some new folks can join in and support that’d be really helpful in ensuring we can continue to bring you these episodes on a weekly basis. 

    • 1 hr 45 min
    “It Feels Like The Goals Have Changed” - Karim from RAM-NYC and Wendy Trevino on the War in Ukraine and the Western Left

    “It Feels Like The Goals Have Changed” - Karim from RAM-NYC and Wendy Trevino on the War in Ukraine and the Western Left

    In this episode we interview Karim from Revolutionary Abolitionist Movement (NYC) and author Wendy Trevino. 
    Karim is an anti-prison, anti-police anarcho-communist. And an author of the book Burn Down The American Plantation.
    Wendy Trevino was born and raised in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas. She lives and works in San Francisco. She is the author of Brazilian Is Not a Race and Cruel Fiction. Wendy is not an experimental writer.
    This conversation is a bit different than many of ours. We wanted to have a critical conversation about the western left’s response to the war in Ukraine, but often we associate anti-imperialist analyses with Marxist-Leninists.  Within the anarchist left and other parts of the western left there are those who support the Ukrainian war effort for various reasons. Although we don’t often take explicit positions as a platform, we at Millennials Are Killing Capitalism think any support for the Ukrainian war effort is mistake. Josh has co-hosted a conversation on their other platform Return To The Source podcast, and now we host this one here.
    In this episode Karim and Wendy provide an analysis of the situation in Ukraine, and they grapple with several of the common misconceptions or positions they encounter. They also talk about the state of affairs for the antifascist movement in the US. And they remind folks that there are many other international struggles that need support, and that there are struggles that need to continue to be waged against fascism, borders, and prisons right here in the belly of the beast.
    It’s a new month and as always we need the support of our listeners to keep this show going. We truly appreciate all of the folks who do contribute to the show at whatever level they can, it means everything to us and to our ability to bring you these episodes weekly. Our only financial support for this show is the support from our listeners. You can become a patron of the show for as little as $1 per month and you get emails with each episode plus periodic invitations to study groups and things like that. We’ll have another study group starting up soon this summer. 
    Links:
    RAM-NYC
    Burn Down The American Plantation: Call for a Revolutionary Abolitionist Movement
    Cruel Fiction
    Brazilian Is Not a Race (PDF)
     

    • 1 hr 48 min
    "Forget What The Ruling Class Deems Unacceptable. Revolution Is Illegal" - Ed Mead On A Life In Struggle

    "Forget What The Ruling Class Deems Unacceptable. Revolution Is Illegal" - Ed Mead On A Life In Struggle

    In this episode we interview Ed Mead. Mead is a veteran of the revolutionary underground organization the George Jackson Brigade which operated in solidarity with prisoner, anti-racist, and anti-imperialist struggles. A prolific organizer and participant of prisoner struggles both inside and outside of prisons, Ed also co-founded the prisoner organization Men Against Sexism. He also worked with a number of other organizations and struggles over the years including work with the Prairie Fire Organizing Committee, the Attica Brothers Legal Defense Committee, the National Lawyers Guild, Prison Legal News, and California Prison Focus. 
    In this conversation we talk about some lessons along the way of Ed’s political development, from social prisoner to jailhouse lawyer to organizer to revolutionary to political prisoner. 
    Ed offers unvarnished reflections from a life in struggle, characteristically with no holds barred for what he refers to as “the tamed left.” 
    Our conversation was informed by Ed Mead’s autobiography Lumpen and by Daniel Burton-Rose’s books on the George Jackson Brigade. We will include a full list of sources in the show notes.
    Links:
    Lumpen: The Autobiography of Ed Mead
    Theory and Practice of Armed Struggle in the Northwest: A Historical Analysis
    Creating A Movement With Teeth: A Documentary History of the George Jackson Brigade
    Guerilla USA: The George Jackson Brigade and the Anticapitalist Underground of the 1970's
    Sundiata Acoli's Support Fund
    Washington Prison History Project Oral Histories

    • 1 hr 8 min
    "The Research Arm of the Movement" - Abdul Alkalimat on The History of Black Studies

    "The Research Arm of the Movement" - Abdul Alkalimat on The History of Black Studies

    Abdul Alkalimat is a founder of the field of Black Studies and Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. A lifelong scholar-activist with a PhD from the University of Chicago, he has lectured, taught and directed academic programs across the US, the Caribbean, Africa, Europe and China. His activism extends from having been chair of the Chicago chapter of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the 1960s, to a co-founder of the Black Radical Congress in 1998.
    This conversation is framed around his recent book The History of Black Studies. Alkalimat shares some of his background, and his experiences with the struggles for Black Studies in the 1960’s. We also talk about his role in the founding of the Institute of the Black World.
    In discussing Black Studies, we ask Dr. Alkalimat about the ideological strains that make it up, the origins of it as an academic discipline, and what Black Studies looked like before it was allowed into the academy and how it continues to look outside of the academy.
    A focus in this conversation is a discussion about social movements and the type of knowledge that is examined within them and the type of knowledge that is produced by them. Within this, we get into discussion about the role of cadre development and mass political education in social movements, and the role that Alkalimat thinks Black Studies can and should still play for these struggles. 
    We close with some discussion of the work Dr. Alkalimat is currently doing with the Southern Workers Assembly to organize the South. 
    In the show notes, we’ll include links to several of the resources Abdul Alkalimat talks about in the episode.
    Thank you again to all of the folks who continue to support us on patreon. If you want to support our work our greatest need right now is for patrons who support on a monthly basis, you can do that for as little as $1 a month. And if you don’t want the monthly payment, you can also make a yearly contribution. You can find our patreon at patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism.
    Now here is our conversation with Abdul Alkalimat on The History of Black Studies.
    Links:
    The History of Black Studies
    The Future of Black Studies (forthcoming)
    Abdul Alkalimat's website & weekly listserv
    Southern Workers Assembly
    The Wall of Respect
    New Philadelphia 
    The cited conversation with Africa World Now Project

    • 1 hr 54 min

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