79 episodes

My mom’s King Ranch Chicken casserole. My small hometown in East Texas. My eleventh grade choir teacher. Know what all of these things have in common? None of them are famous. None have been written about or sung about or reported on. You might call them “ordinary.”

Welcome to Ordinary People. Ordinary Things. Where we talk about all the things that we see and touch and fear and feel and eat and hope for - every day. Because that’s what life is, you know? It’s one miracle after another - we just get so used to seeing them...we call them ordinary.

“THE WORLD IS A SERIES OF MIRACLES. BUT WE’RE SO USED TO SEEING THEM WE JUST CALL THEM ORDINARY THINGS." - Hans Christian Anderson

Ordinary People. Ordinary Things. with Melissa Radke Melissa Radke

    • Christianity

My mom’s King Ranch Chicken casserole. My small hometown in East Texas. My eleventh grade choir teacher. Know what all of these things have in common? None of them are famous. None have been written about or sung about or reported on. You might call them “ordinary.”

Welcome to Ordinary People. Ordinary Things. Where we talk about all the things that we see and touch and fear and feel and eat and hope for - every day. Because that’s what life is, you know? It’s one miracle after another - we just get so used to seeing them...we call them ordinary.

“THE WORLD IS A SERIES OF MIRACLES. BUT WE’RE SO USED TO SEEING THEM WE JUST CALL THEM ORDINARY THINGS." - Hans Christian Anderson

    Nurse Katherine Answers Your Questions

    Nurse Katherine Answers Your Questions

    Katherine is a nurse practitioner who worked for many years at a very good OBGYN practice here in town. She left this practice to go work at the health clinic. A month later, she said it was one of the most fulfilling things ever. She's working with people and especially teenagers on the issues that are the most near and dear to her heart. Her work is about sex and our bodies.

    • 43 min
    ReRelease of 3.15 This Christmas

    ReRelease of 3.15 This Christmas

    This is the first time I've rereleased an episode. I'm interupting our season on teens, social media and sex to rerelease an episode that came out around Christmas time with my friend Billie Jean Johnson. This was a powerful episode. I heard from so many of you that this episode moved you, challenged you, and made you think that you might want something more or different from your life. Billie Jean was facing one of the hardest challenges of her life, and she lost. At least, here on Earth.
    On Thursday February 13th, Billie Jean took her last breath. Now she is probably healthier and happier than I've ever seen her. Which is saying something, because I'm pretty sure Billie Jean was happy 99% of the time. If you're looking at Earthly standards  then I guess Billie Jean lost. If you're looking at what cancer wins and what people lose, then she lost. If you're anything like me, her husband, or her kids you know she didn't lose. She won everything she was fighting for. 
    To remember Billie Jean Johnson, I'm rereleasing this episode. I'm going to miss Billie Jean. I'm going to take with me lessons that she taught me when we sat face to face towards the end of her life. If you haven't listened to this episode, here's your chance. Think about this family this week. We’ll have a service for her this coming Saturday the 22nd. No doubt, it will be packed. She touched so many people. Her work here is done and ours is just beginning. This is for Billie Jean. 
    Show Notes:
    [07:50] Billy Jean’s go-to meal in Lufkin would be a turkey burger from Mom's Diner. [07:57] Friendship means family and being there through the good and the ugly.  [08:23] Every one Billie Jean knows has risen to this season.  [09:16] Billie Jean has many roles and the actress who would play her might surprise you. [09:47] Billie Jean has always been an optimistic person. She believes that God is good and only gives good gifts.  [10:22] Her perspective on life is taking care of what God has put her here to do and nothing else matters. [11:43] Her family is her greatest testimony, so she's letting them see how she can live and die graciously. [14:15] Billie Jean had a great health report from the doctor. Two weeks later they went back to the doctor, and found out that the tumors had grown. There were so many tumors that Billie Jean wouldn't make it through the surgery to remove them. [15:20] When Billie Jean and her husband heard this news, they were shocked.  [16:25] Billie Jean doesn't worry about the fear of dying, it's what she leaves behind that has to wrestle with the pain.  [17:20] Years ago, Billie Jean dealt with losing her dad from addiction and her sister's addiction. She then took care of her sister's children. The whole experience was an emotional roller coaster for Billie Jean.  [18:31] She cried out to God, and he took the pain away from her. [21:31] She can't complain about cancer or ask God for anymore, because of all the wonderful things he has done for her in this life. [22:29] Billie Jean trusts that God's going to help take care of her family. She believes that whatever the reason for all of this is that God's fulfilling his purpose. [23:19] Moms want to prepare their children as much as they can, but they don't really know how. We don't know what we're doing, but what we do know is that we're going to be gracious to each other. [25:48] Billie Jean's relationship with God is very sweet.  [25:43] When she is really having a hard day, she listens to worship music and let's her family know she loves them.  [27:39] God's love is so rich. If your emotions aren't benefiting, you try something else. Don't stop talking to him, and he won't leave you stranded. [29:28] Billie Jean used to think that she was introverted and didn't have friends, but the love and support of her community has been overwhelming. [29:58] Treat everybody well, becau

    • 51 min
    Net Navigation

    Net Navigation

    There's a running list of things I don't understand and one of them is the internet. The internet is constantly changing. It goes deep and wide. Another thing I don't understand is teenagers. We may just use the internet for the things that we normally do like podcasts, shopping Facebook, and the rest. But teenagers, what do they do on the internet? Do they feel the same as we do and just use the internet for Amazon Prime orders, social posts, and reading safe blogs?
    I may not understand teens and I may not understand the vastness of the internet, but I've come to my senses when it comes to teens and the World Wide Web. We can't bury our heads in the sand. That is why Christina Jontra is the perfect guest for today’s show and today’s times. Christina has a background in teaching and technology. When working in a school, she noticed an alarming trend with kids internet use and being preyed on by predators. YouTube, social media, and games with chat are all tools that predators can use to patiently groom our children for a disastrous meeting. 
    The internet is also permanent. Most of us don’t have to worry about the dumb things we did as teens or preteens following us around, but our kids do. There are also dangers of accidentally stumbling on porn or graphic violence. There are also issues with kids being bullied or feeling left out of things that can impact their self esteem. This is why Christina started Neptune Navigate. She educates parents, kids, and teens on how to navigate in this digital age. We talk about when a kid should get a mobile device, how to monitor kids usage, ways to educate you and your teen, and how to find out more by asking Christina questions. 
    Show Notes:
    [05:33] Christina was the director of digital learning at Grace Community School in Tyler, TX.  [06:48] Her school had an iPad program where each student got an iPad. Christina felt such responsibility turning the kids loose on the internet. A young girl was being harassed by a boy through the messaging app Kik.  [08:14] Kik only keeps 50 interactions. The boy in question wasn't doing it. Someone had stolen his likeness.  [09:56] Christina wanted the email account attached to that boy's account. Kik a Canadian company wouldn't share it. [10:32] Christina's husband overhears some kids talking about pretending to be older than they are on Kik.  [11:00] They informed the kids' parents. [13:09] Christina discovers how patient sexual predators can be. A predator played games online with a young girl for years before coming to her town and raping her. The young woman spent her senior year of high school testifying in three trials.  [13:38] Christina began reading and researching this. She spent hours researching and started talking to parents about things they could do at home to help keep their kids safe. [14:55] The young woman who was raped decided to also talk to the parents. [15:44] Mobile devices can give predators easy access to our kids. [16:50] After eight years, Christina quit her job and decided to help educate parents and children how to better navigate this digital world.  [17:27] They launched a year ago as a research library. Now they are going to put everything out for free. They also have a school program.  [19:30] There is no magic bullet or wall high enough to keep the bad stuff off. [21:11] Sit down with your kids and look at the phone together. Look at the camera roll. Kids take pictures of things they like. [21:50] See who your kids follow on social media and who follows them. Ask who people are and check your kids privacy settings. [22:17] When kids first get on social media make their account private. [24:59] Put restrictions on what your kids can install and monitor their texts. [26:42] YouTube exposes kids to lots of danger.  [28:00] Pedophiles hang out on YouTube and find videos of kids doing things like gymna

    • 59 min
    Rhythms of Renewal

    Rhythms of Renewal

    About 10 years ago, I wasn't doing any of the things I'm doing now. I wasn't writing books. I wasn't hosting podcasts. I was sitting at home and watching other women go first. A lot of us find someone who is doing what we want to do and we follow them and root for them and listen closely when they speak. I was at home watching Rebekah Lyons. I've loved her from the moment I heard her speak. This might surprise some of you, after hearing this interview, because we couldn't be more different. She is all love, light, kindness and gracefulness. 
    I've watched her long enough to know that what she speaks she walks. That's all you can ask for. Put people in front of me who are paving the way with truth, candor, and authenticity. She is all of these things. As we wrap up the series on rest, sabbath, pause, uncluttering, slowing down and being intentional we couldn't have found a better guest to end it with. 
    Rebekah Lyons is a national speaker and bestselling author of Rhythms of Renewal: Trading Stress and Anxiety for a Life of Peace and Purpose, You Are Free: Be Who You Already Are and Freefall to Fly: A Breathtaking Journey Toward a Life of Meaning. An old soul with a contemporary, honest voice, Rebekah reveals her own battles to overcome anxiety and depression—and invites others to discover and boldly pursue their God-given purpose from a place of freedom. Finding joy in raising a special needs child—Rebekah wears her heart on her sleeve, a benefit to friends and readers alike.
    Show Notes:
    [03:05] Rebekah was one of the first people that Melissa followed on Instagram. [04:16] Rebekah and her husband run a non-profit.  [06:37] The first time Rebekah spoke publicly, she was vulnerable about her journey. [08:50] Freefall to Fly was a chronicle of Rebekah's crash and burn. Her family moved from Atlanta to New York City. She tells a lot of stories about this season and how she wanted to run back to the South.  [12:11] God put her in a place that she wasn't excited about, but those were the transformative times in her life.  [13:02] Rebekah started experiencing claustrophobia. She would take stairs to avoid elevators and stopped riding the subway. [13:31] She was outgoing and energetic but became a shell of who she was because she couldn't go anywhere. [14:12] There are different panic attack triggers for different people. [15:50] Rebekah had a relapse, but then had to ask if she was a fraud in her next book. Her patterns of chronic stress had to be reformed. [17:50] There's renewal happening everyday. [18:52] Don't do the same thing over and over and expect it to be different. [20:09] We have to do the work. We can't fix patterns of behavior and thinking in one day.  [23:29] Don't settle for a story someone tries to impose on you. Ask God to remind you of the story that he has already set in motion and that's part of the healing journey. [25:11] We're going to talk about the four rhythms or disciplines that Rebekah feels are essential to feeling less anxiety and stress. [25:55] They are rest, restore, connect, and create. Rest and restore are the input rhythms that fill you up. Connect and create are the output rhythms. [26:09] 77% of society have physical symptoms of stress. As a result, we need to rest. [27:37] Life starts in rhythm. Each rhythm is a different part of our health.  [29:50] Her book has a lot of practical ways on how to slow down. [30:50] We don't have to share everything. Whose validation are we seeking? [31:31] Our worth isn't attached to what we share with other people. We are worthy of rest and indulgence.   [34:04] Until you get quiet you can't know what your heart needs to confess.  [36:26] Rebekah spent two days pulling weeds. She wanted to recover the passion of her vocation. She pulled weeds like distractions.  [39:06] Sometimes we say yes to things when we shouldn't because they crowd

    • 51 min
    Melissa & David Q&A

    Melissa & David Q&A

    Melissa and David are here today to answer listener questions. Melissa loves it when people ask questions. We appreciate you trusting us with all of the things we'll be talking about today and on future episodes. The last couple of weeks have been dedicated to something that Melissa just can't wrap her mind around. We've been talking about being still, organizing, and decluttering our homes and our hearts, space, and putting your phone away. 
    If someone would have told me that in the year 1994 when David and I got married that someday David would be checking his phone while we were having conversations, and I would be checking my watch for incoming messages, I would have laughed them out of house and home. Here we are learning how to create space and balance in a way that we didn't have to learn back then. We are navigating a whole new world.
    Before we dive into the listener questions, we just want to say thank you for trusting us with your questions, even though we don't have all of the answers. We do love each other very much, and we are in this marriage for the long haul. We work really hard on our marriage, so we are going to try and do the best we can with your questions. David also wanted to share that just asking the question or talking about it or hearing someone else talk it can help you feel less alone.
    Show Notes:
    [06:34] Someone from Vista, California said she loves the show. Her and her husband will be married 35 years. The only way she could keep balance when the kids were young was to go away on weekends every three to four months. [09:00] Question from Sarah: How to get a guilt free girls night? Her husband only does stuff with her. He doesn't have any friends and doesn't go out. [10:27] Sarah has guilt going out, because her husband just wants to be with her. [11:48] David suggests Sarah's husband be supportive. One of the ways Melissa recharges is by spending time by herself or by spending time with other people. [12:20] When Melissa and David got married, David was jealous of her time. This has changed, because David discovered that Melissa becomes better after having time off with her friends or family.  [14:29] It's a good idea to have moments of conversation about how important it is and be nice and treat other people well. Say thank you, and it wouldn't hurt to help him find a hobby.  [15:19] Selena is the adoptive mother of a special-needs child. He is now an adult, and Selena is struggling with drawing lines in the sand and kind of pushing him out of the nest. At what point does she say you're ready and it's time to go? [17:04] We are at a double deficit when it comes to answering this question. We don't have a special needs child, and we haven't come to the season where we release our children out into the world. [18:00] Every situation with every child is going to be different. Seeking counseling with people who have expertise and can give true insight on your specific situation would be a good idea. [18:33] It seems to Melissa that you have dealt with this for so many years that you and your husband are a little off-balance on how to be alone and how to make time for one another. [21:45] Ellen asks how to schedule sex in your life when you and your partner have opposite schedules? [22:12] Men can be more flexible, try to find a time that works for Ellen. There's something romantic and life giving when the other partner is intentional.  [25:29] It can't be pushed away for too long without having some effect. [27:29] Donna asks how to come to an agreement when it's time to talk about a problem? This gives her anxiety. If we don't communicate to begin with, how could we communicate about a problem? [28:25] Not communicating at all is a red flag. We are firm believers in marriage counseling. When there are problems, husbands don't want to go. Invest in a counselor now, before you are engulfed

    • 41 min
    Uncluttered

    Uncluttered

    A few months ago I got a book in the mail titled Uncluttered. Imagine that frozen moment in time, when I was holding this book while standing in my kitchen surrounded by, you guessed it, clutter! In spite of the stuff that creates clutter, today's podcast isn't about removing physical clutter. It's about removing noise, stress, and over commitments. This show is for anyone who wakes up from a nap and says, "I wish I could do that again." 
    It's for people who buy books and find them later dusty and unread. It's for those who meet God on vacation or in quiet moments and wish they had more times like that. Courtney Ellis is a writer, speaker, and mom of three. She serves alongside her husband as a Presbyterian pastor in Southern California. She is the author of Uncluttered and Almost Holy Mama. Courtney is also an advocate for minimal-ish living, a crossword puzzle nerd, and a candy connoisseur. 
    This episode will hit home for a lot of you, because it’s about discovering that there is room and space in our lives for the things that matter. We just have to sometimes make that room. Courtney shares her journey with getting rid of physical, digital, and time clutter and learning to let go and rest. She shares how to make it a personal experience depending on the seasons and preferences of your family. It’s all about living with less to create more. This is a fun, practical, and sweet interview. I know you’re going to love Courtney as much as I do. 
    Show Notes:
    [03:20] Courtney grew up in the Midwest. She's from Wisconsin. She now lives in Southern California with her family where she has a fear of earthquakes. [04:38] Her oldest son is seven. Her middle son is 3 and 1/2. She also has a nine month old baby girl. [04:59] Courtney and her husband are co-pastors in a Presbyterian Church. They take turns being home with the kids. [06:08] It's easy to burn out if you aren't caring for your marriage and caring for your soul. Simplicity, Sabbath practice, and resting are even more important for those of us who serve in ministry. [06:53] Courtney has written two books, and they both came out the same year.  [07:43] Writing is what fills Courtney's cup back up.  [08:09] The lessons of Courtney's books are universal, because they aren't how to books, they are me to books. They are invitations to practice spiritual practices and live with less, so God can give you more. [09:29] Uncluttered is about going from overwhelmed to rest. Her schedule, closets, and digital media were too full. Something had to change, because she couldn't go on that way any longer. [10:04] The book is all about less. It's about how she pared down her digital life and cleaned out her closets. The second half of the book was the biggest surprise to her, because she started writing about less and God started teaching her about more. [10:36] God wanted to give her amazing things, but her schedule had no room. It's the story of more to less to more. [15:24] Courtney and her family began the journey by stopping. They stopped buying non-essentials, and they stopped putting things on their calendar. [16:10] They also have a sacred family Sabbath. They rest, play, and nap. They have to say no to a lot to make it happen, but it reset every other area in their lives. [19:26] Possessions aren't neutral. Everything we have takes time to store, care for, and manage. Each possession was stealing time from Courtney. She wanted that valuable time back. [22:28] Uncluttering the soul and the spirit has changed everything for Courtney and her family. She also pared-down social media. We can make the choices whether we want to give our time away or not. [25:49] What would you do if the end result was hearing God better? [28:46] For Courtney, it was a journey of God being willing to meet her where she is in her life now. [29:26] Courtney would meditate on scripture in the s

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

geeise ,

Thankyou!

I just binged on all of your episodes today and I feel like I have made a new friend (or two)! Nothing beats hanging with Melissa when you’ve got to fold the laundry and clean the bathroom. Thanks for coming into my home and not judging me on the state it’s in! I loved the teaching and the banter. Only a genius can make forgiveness fun and I just love that your pastor is hilarious too! What is going on out there in Texas? I need to visit. Can’t wait for next Tuesday!!!

Top Podcasts In Christianity

Listeners Also Subscribed To