166 episodes

Information about marine and coastal environments. News and interviews with marine scientists, campaigners and conservation workers. Presented by volunteer broadcasters who are passionate about marine environments, both local and across the world.

Out of the Blue Andrew, Erin, Fam, Heather, James and Matt.

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Information about marine and coastal environments. News and interviews with marine scientists, campaigners and conservation workers. Presented by volunteer broadcasters who are passionate about marine environments, both local and across the world.

    Strange Fish

    Strange Fish

    In this episode, James chats to Zena Cumpston, a Barkandji woman and research fellow at the University of Melbourne, to find out all about eels that still make their way through the drains of the university, following old watercourses buried under the concrete. Zena tells us about her research on Indigenous knowledge and the importance of learning about our pre-invasion environment. Find out more at The Living Pavillion. On the other side of the continent, Dr Nerida Wilson, Senior Research Scientist at the Western Australian Museum, is part of a new project calling for people to search for seadragons. Seadragons are some of the most wonderful and unique inhabitants of southern Australia's oceans, but we still know surprisingly little about them. You can help scientists learn more about them by sending in photos of any seadragons you see. Find out more at Seadragon Search. 

    Tiny seals! And the ocean construction boom

    Tiny seals! And the ocean construction boom

    In this episode, we speak to Monash University Phd candidate James Rule about his exciting fossil findings on Port Phillip Bay. James and his team recently discovered nine fossil seals, dating back to six million years ago when the bay was warmer, and much more dangerous. But these seals aren't like the ones found around Melbourne today: they're smaller to start with. Find out more about James' work here, and support his research by donating to the Lost World of Bayside. We also speak to Dr Ana Bugnot from the University of Sydney, about her recent research on ocean construction. Ports, pipelines, oil rigs - the oceans are full of things we've built, and they has a big impact on marine ecosystems. With much more construction planned for the near future, Ana says we need to start planning ocean infrastructure the same way we plan for building on land. Find out more about her research here. 

    Plastic is in the food we eat - what can we do?

    Plastic is in the food we eat - what can we do?

    Many of us are worried about plastic pollution and its impact on the environment. But we still have a lot to learn. New research shows that microplastics are found in some of our favourites seafoods - sardines, prawns, oysters. Research author Francisca Ribeiro says the findings raise more questions than answers. And Plastic Free July is the movement founded 10 years ago in Perth that asks people to give up plastic for a month. This year July was very different - thanks to the pandemic many of us can't use keep cups at cafes, and there's a lot more takeaway going on. Still, every little bit counts, says Rebecca Prince-Ruiz, founder of Plastic Free July. Rebecca has just co-authored a book on the movement with Joanna Atherfold Finn, Plastic Free. Resources: Francica Ribeiro, Microplastics in seafoodRebecca Prince-Ruiz and Joanna Atherfold Finn, Plastic Free: The inspiring story of a global environmental movement and why it matters, NewSouthPlastic Free July

    Green Seas

    Green Seas

    In this episode we're all about ocean plants. In Tasmania, 95% of forest-forming giant kelp have disappeared, as waters warm along one of the fastest heating coasts in the world. We speak to Dr Cayne Layton, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, UTAS, about a new project attempting to restore the kelp. And on the other side of the continent, Phd candidate Cristian Salinas is figuring out how much carbon is lost to the atmosphere when sea grass beds are destroyed: it's a lot. 

    Something smells gassy

    Something smells gassy

    In 2018 the Victorian government released new areas of seafloor for oil and gas exploration, and we'll soon find out which companies were successful in winning exploration licenses. But local campaigners are concerned about the social and environmental impacts. We spoke to Kate Wattchow from Friends of the Earth, and Samantha Hepburn, Professor of law at Deakin University, the get the low down. 

    A story as big as a whale

    A story as big as a whale

    The anti-whaling movement of the 1970s was one of the first global environmental campaigns. But even though whaling has mostly stopped, whales face even more threats today, from plastic and noise pollution to climate change. In her new book Fathoms (Scribe 2020), writer and environmental philosopher Rebecca Giggs argues that whales can help us tell new stories about our impact on nature. 

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