97 episodes

Researchers from across the scientific disciplines share the unpublished stories behind their recently published research, along with the background of their scientific discoveries.

Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves‪.‬ Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.

    • Natural Sciences
    • 4.0 • 1 Rating

Researchers from across the scientific disciplines share the unpublished stories behind their recently published research, along with the background of their scientific discoveries.

    The Dyatlov Pass incident – Alexander Puzrin

    The Dyatlov Pass incident – Alexander Puzrin

    In episode 97 of Parsing Science, we’ll talk with Alexander Puzrin from ETH Zurich about his research into a 62-year-old mystery over the deaths of 9 hikers in the freezing Russian wilderness, a tragedy that’s been attributed to everything from a yeti to military weapons testing, and an avalanche.

    • 37 min
    Monkey Business – Jean-Baptiste “JB” Leca

    Monkey Business – Jean-Baptiste “JB” Leca

    Do monkeys know how much fruit your sunglasses are worth? In episode 96 of Parsing Science, we talk with Jean-Baptiste "JB" Leca about his field research observing interactions among macaques at a Hindu temple in Bali. There, the monkeys have learned to rob tourists of everything from smartphones to flip flops, and then barter their return to temple staff in exchange for food.

    • 35 min
    Positively Negative – Shiri Melumad

    Positively Negative – Shiri Melumad

    How much can you trust people's retelling of information the've read? In episode 95, Shiri Melumad discusses her research showing that when – much like the children’s game “telephone” – news is repeatedly retold, it undergoes a stylistic transformation through which the original facts are increasingly replaced by opinions and interpretations, with a slant toward negativity.

    • 25 min
    How Mosquitoes Target Us – Zhilei Zhao & Lindy McBride

    How Mosquitoes Target Us – Zhilei Zhao & Lindy McBride

    In episode 94, we talk with Lindy McBride and Zhilei Zhao from Princeton about their research into how mosquitoes that can carry dangerous diseases such as Zika, dengue, West Nile virus and malaria are able to track us down so quickly while ignoring other warm-blooded animals.

    • 28 min
    Epistemic Puzzles in ‘The Witness’ – Luke Cuddy

    Epistemic Puzzles in ‘The Witness’ – Luke Cuddy

    In episode 93, Luke Cuddy from Southwestern College’s philosophy program talks about the video game 'The Witness,' which presents players with a multitude of increasingly sophisticated and frustrating puzzles that perhaps result from a theory of knowledge it reflects.

    • 28 min
    Unintended Consequences of Legal Reforms – Ángela Zorro Medina

    Unintended Consequences of Legal Reforms – Ángela Zorro Medina

    What effect did copying the U.S.'s legal system have on Colombia's incarceration system? In episode 92, Ángela Zorro Medina discusses her research into how transitioning to an adversarial model of criminal procedure – one controlled by the prosecutor and defense, rather than by the judge and court – impacted the number of inmates detained before their court trials.

    • 30 min

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