6 episodes

Why are English phrasal verbs so confusing? This podcast will answer that question, and show you exactly how to use them.


Private Facebook community for introverted language learners: https://form.jotform.com/alyssapoco/facebook-group Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/phrasalverbs/support

Phrasal Verbs + Expat Life Alyssa

    • Language Learning

Why are English phrasal verbs so confusing? This podcast will answer that question, and show you exactly how to use them.


Private Facebook community for introverted language learners: https://form.jotform.com/alyssapoco/facebook-group Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/phrasalverbs/support

    Word stress in phrasal verbs- there's a rule!

    Word stress in phrasal verbs- there's a rule!

    In this episode I discuss how important word stress is in English in general, and give you lots of examples. I give you more tips on how to know when someone uses a ~phrasal verb...if its really a phrasal verb or the NOUN version. The end of the episode also includes an exercise to practice your listening skills (to see if you can differentiate between nouns vs phrasal verbs.)

    In a nutshell: for most phrasal verbs, PUT THE STRESS ON THE SECOND WORD! The meaning changes if you put the stress on the first word.

    (My Argentinian intonation is coming through a lot in this episode. Yes, my native language is English! But just as you can pick up accents in new places, you can pick up intonations, EVEN SPEAKING A DIFFERENT LANGUAGE. Maybe its a whole attitude. Anyways, some of my speech patterns here are a little less US and a little more Argentina. :P If that sounds confusing to you, what I mean is, I literally sound Argentinian when I speak English sometimes.



    Follow me on Instagram @english.for.introverts

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    • 20 min
    Are phrasal verbs informal? Formality in English explained

    Are phrasal verbs informal? Formality in English explained

    In this episode I cover some important concepts that will help you in your English journey, not only with phrasal verbs:

    1. PHRASAL VERBS ARE NOT 'INFORMAL'
    2. formality in English
    2. ENGLISH IS NOT PRONOUNCED THE WAY IT IS SPELLED
    3. Latin based words (formal, save for writing) and Germanic based words (perfect for spoken English.) 

    I use a speech from Barrack Obama to illustrate how phrasal verbs are not informal, or slang. They are essential to sounding natural in SPOKEN ENGLISH. 

    A list of German vs Latin words in English (Latin is formal and Germanic is normal.) : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Germanic_and_Latinate_equivalents_in_English 

    Note: this is not an exclusive list to be memorized, there are thousands and thousands of examples.



    Here is the speech by Barrack Obama that I shared, in the entire speech I counted 25 phrasal verbs in 16 minutes:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueMNqdB1QIE&list=LL&index=24&t=0s 

    Follow me on Instagram @english.for.introverts

    Join our Facebook community of Introverted Language Learners: https://form.jotform.com/alyssapoco/facebook-group


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    • 26 min
    Word order in separable phrasal verbs (take on me, take me on?!)

    Word order in separable phrasal verbs (take on me, take me on?!)

    In this episode I make use of the song 'Take on me' by the 80's Norwegian band a-ha to explain the rule of word order in separable phrasal verbs. 

    *I do not own the rights to this song, and the segment of the song played in this episode is for educational purposes only.*

    Rule:  With separable phrasal verbs, if the direct object is a pronoun ( me, you, I we, etc) it has to go in the middle of the phrasal verb. That is, it has to be separate. 



    TAKE ON-  transitive


    Transitive- take on something. To accept some work or responsibility-
    Together- “ She is really taking on a lot at work these days. “
    “Working mothers take on a lot.”

    2. Transitive and Separable-  to fight or compete against someone (similar if you imagine it as accepting some work, the work of fighting someone.) Often used for competitive or sporting events.

    Together- “ The Chicago Bulls will take on the Mets next Saturday.”
    Separate- “ Our team will take them on!”  (less common)





    Useful links-

    Stay up to date and follow me on Instagram @english.for.introverts  .  (I changed my username from what I said in the episode!)

    Macmillan Dictionary- take on:  https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/take-on

    Introverted Language Learner private Facebook community: https://form.jotform.com/alyssapoco/facebook-group

    Espresso English- summary of phrasal verbs! : https://www.espressoenglish.net/phrasal-verbs-in-english/

    Youtube- a-ha Take on me video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djV11Xbc914

    Lyrics to 'Take on me': https://genius.com/A-ha-take-on-me-lyrics 

    Separable phrasal verb practice worksheet from Cambridge: https://www.cambridge.org/grammarandbeyond/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/PhrasalVerbsDownloadable.pdf




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    • 1 hr 7 min
    Fill out, find out, figure out

    Fill out, find out, figure out

    In this episode we discuss fill out, find out, and figure out. We compare find out and figure out, because they are commonly confused with each other. 

     Fill out:

     1. transitive and separable- to complete a form with information.  Very similar to 'fill in,' though that is more typically used with shorter things, such as fill in blank, fill in one line of information, instead of filling out a whole application or form.



     2. A) intransitive (more common)- a euphemism (that means a nice way to say something) for gaining weight. Not necessarily positive or negative. Although please note that in the US it is not polite to comment on people's weight.  So its better to use it to speak about yourself, or you might hear family members using it with each other. I have really filled out during the quarantine.  I need to buy all new clothes!

     B) transitive and separable - same meaning. She fills that dress out beautifully. 



     Find out:  (takes less effort , less analyzing, less of a process than figure out)  To simply find an answer to something but checking, online, in a book, asking a person, etc. You might look it up or check. 

    1.  A) intransitive , can be used as a complete phrase alone- to find the single answer to a question, such as a definition, a time, a scheduled event, a fact, etc. I don't know when our next meeting is, but I'll find out. (You will simply check your calendar or ask your colleagues.) Notice there is no direct object here. 

    More examples that are common phrases:

    I don't know, but I'll find out.
    Can you please find out?
    When will we find out?

    B) transitive and inseparable- same meaning, but has a direct object. 

    When will you find out who your new neighbors are?

     2. intransitive and separable (rare)-  for people to discover something secret or hidden about you, to discover who you really are. In the job interview I lied and said I passed the IELTS exam, but they didn't ask for the proof. I hope they don't find me out.



    Figure out:  transitive and separable
    Takes more effort than find out. The word 'figure' comes from math, we can call numbers figures. So figure out means to find a solution after a bit of thought. 

    examples :
    We need to figure out what we are going to make for dinner.
    He has to figure out what he wants in life.
    Can't you figure it out?
    I can't figure out how to put this piece of furniture together.



    Follow me on Instagram (I changed my username from what I said in the episode!) @english.for.introverts


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    • 17 min
    Why are phrasal verbs confusing and how to learn them

    Why are phrasal verbs confusing and how to learn them

    Stay up to date and follow me on Instagram @english.for.introverts  .  (I changed my username from what I said in the episode!)

    Ok, so this was the second podcast I ever recorded in my life, but the information here is almost like a phrasal verbs masterclass. Almost. I intentionally did not go into more detail; I don't want to scare you away! There is a reference photo at the bottom of this description that will be useful to copy into your notebook or save.

    In this episode we discuss:

    Why are phrasal verbs confusing (multiple meanings, used with pronoun IT and therefore no context within the sentence, connotation (the feeling behind it, is it negative or positive, etc,) THERE ARE SO MANY, and finally, they have specific usage and classification (transitive, intransitive.)



    How to learn them!

    Specific websites that are useful for this, linked above. Not all dictionaries (I’m looking at you, Cambridge) tell if phrasal verbs are transitive or intransitive.

    Other tips for learning phrasal verbs, such as mindset.

    https://imgur.com/JoQ2uvE






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    • 30 min
    Who am I and what is this podcast about?

    Who am I and what is this podcast about?

    Stay up to date and follow me on Instagram @english.for.introverts  .  (I changed my username from what I said in the episode!)

    In this episode I introduce myself, tell you a little about my background, and give you a brief explanation of what to expect from this podcast.


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    • 11 min

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