18 episodes

The University of Chicago prides itself on cross-disciplinary research. To promote interaction between disciplines, physics research is primarily carried out in three research institutes: Enrico Fermi Institute, the James Franck Institute and the Institute for Biophysical Dynamics.

Physics The University of Chicago

    • Science

The University of Chicago prides itself on cross-disciplinary research. To promote interaction between disciplines, physics research is primarily carried out in three research institutes: Enrico Fermi Institute, the James Franck Institute and the Institute for Biophysical Dynamics.

    • video
    Extreme Universe Observatory

    Extreme Universe Observatory

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Prof. Angela V. Olinto is the U.S. leader of an international collaboration to use the Earth’s atmosphere as a particle detector

    • 2 min
    • video
    A Vortex Tied in Knots (Video)

    A Vortex Tied in Knots (Video)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    University of Chicago physicists have succeeded in creating a vortex knot—a feat akin to tying a smoke ring into a knot. Linked and knotted vortex loops have existed in theory for more than a century, but creating them in the laboratory had previously eluded scientists.

    • 4 min
    A Vortex Tied in Knots (Audio)

    A Vortex Tied in Knots (Audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    University of Chicago physicists have succeeded in creating a vortex knot—a feat akin to tying a smoke ring into a knot. Linked and knotted vortex loops have existed in theory for more than a century, but creating them in the laboratory had previously eluded scientists.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Knotted Vortex (Video)

    Knotted Vortex (Video)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    For more information, see this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ja886GtHlcE

    University of Chicago physicists have succeeded in creating a vortex knot—a feat akin to tying a smoke ring into a knot. Linked and knotted vortex loops have existed in theory for more than a century, but creating them in the laboratory had previously eluded scientists.

    • 42 sec
    Knotted Vortex (Audio)

    Knotted Vortex (Audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    For more information, see this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ja886GtHlcE

    University of Chicago physicists have succeeded in creating a vortex knot—a feat akin to tying a smoke ring into a knot. Linked and knotted vortex loops have existed in theory for more than a century, but creating them in the laboratory had previously eluded scientists.

    • 42 sec
    • video
    The Physics of Fluid-Grain Suspensions

    The Physics of Fluid-Grain Suspensions

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Heinrich Jaeger, William J. Friedman and Alicia Townsend Professor in Physics, and Scott Waitukaitis, a graduate student in the Physics department, have published a report in the July 12 issue of Nature on the process of impact-activated solidification that occurs when compressive forces are applied to fluid-grain suspensions. The two researchers conduct experiments with a mixture of cornstarch and water that is classified as a non-Newtonian liquid. Their work examines the strange behavior of the cornstarch-water liquid, which instantly changes into a solid within the area of impact. The behavior of non-Newtonian liquids has puzzled scientists for decades, and Waitukaitis and Jaeger’s report sheds new light on this longstanding problem in suspension science.

    • 2 min

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