169 episodes

American history preserved through the use of Primary sources, Black History, African American History~ The african experience; Shared by the legends themselves, their descendants, loved ones, genealogist and scholars. Presented by The Gist of Freedom

Primary Sources, Black History Gist of Freedom

    • Society & Culture

American history preserved through the use of Primary sources, Black History, African American History~ The african experience; Shared by the legends themselves, their descendants, loved ones, genealogist and scholars. Presented by The Gist of Freedom

    DID YOU KNOW THAT... With Robert Green: Emory Conrad Malick

    DID YOU KNOW THAT... With Robert Green: Emory Conrad Malick

    Did You Know... with Robert Green and Black Aviators Historian Guy E. Franklin

    Emory Conrad Malick

    In 2004, Pennsylvania native Mary Groce was going through a box of family papers with her cousin Aileen when she found a sheet of old letterhead for an “Emory C. Malick, Licensee: Pilot No. 105.” Included on the letterhead was a photograph of a handsome young man in a Curtiss pusher-type airplane.

    Groce handed the letterhead to her cousin, asking: “Have you ever seen this photo of our great-uncle Emory?” She recalls her cousin’s surprise: “Aileen looked at the paper and replied, ‘Oh my God. He’s black.’

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    Emory C. Malick, Curtiss Aviation School, 1912

    Emory Conrad Malick (1881-1958) was the first licensed African American aviator, earning his International Pilot’s License (Federation Aeronautique Internationale, or F.A.I., license), #105, on March 20, 1912, while attending the Curtiss School of Aviation on North Island, San Diego, California. Mr. Malick was also the first African American pilot to earn his Federal Airline Transport License, #1716, in 1927. But his name is as yet unknown.

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    Black Aviators, Hubert Fauntleroy, William Powell, Dorothy E. Tate, John C. Robinson Coleman Young, George Washington, 

    • 28 min
    Descendant Tamara Lanier Explains Suit Against Harvard And Slavery Images

    Descendant Tamara Lanier Explains Suit Against Harvard And Slavery Images

    Descendant Tamara Lanier Explains Suit Against Harvard And Slavery Images

    The Gist of Freedom and Guest host Kimberly Simmons welcomes Tamara Lanier. Join us as Mrs. Lanier updates us on her suit against Harvard

    Lawsuit by gr-gr-gr-granddaughter of slavery survivor  blasts Harvard for collecting licensing fees on the photos  of her ancestors which were used in racist research. 

    “These images were taken under duress, ordered by a Harvard professor bent on proving the inferiority of African-Americans,” said her lawyer Michael Koskoff. “Harvard has no right to keep them, let alone profit from them. It’s about time the university accepted responsibility for its shameful history and for the way it has treated Papa Renty and his family.”

    • 40 min
    Langston Hughes, Jesse B. Semple by Lewis Cole, Now Theater

    Langston Hughes, Jesse B. Semple by Lewis Cole, Now Theater

    Langston Hughes,  Jesse B. Semple by Lewis Cole, Now Theater

    • 40 min
    Slavery Survivors' Descendants Own Nat Turner Plantation!

    Slavery Survivors' Descendants Own Nat Turner Plantation!

    Slavery Survivors' Descendants Own Nat Turner Plantation! Turner Family offer Nat Turner's  Cave, to be part of driving tour | http://bit.ly/NatTurnerTour


    The Turner descendants gained a piece of history when they inherited his two farms.


    Nat Turner was an enslaved African American who led a rebellion of enslaved and free black men in Southampton County, Virginia on August 21, 1831, that resulted in the deaths of 55 to 65 white people.


    He used a cave for his refuge . It was in that cave that Nat Turner was discovered. 


    The Turner Family hope to have the location of the cave added as a part of a proposed driving tour — backed by the Southampton County Historical Society — that would follow the journey of Nat Turner and the rebellion.


    “We feel that it is our duty to our grandfather, Sidney, to pass on the history of our land, and that it is our purpose to keep that history alive for future generations,” Hawkins said.


     

    • 58 min
    In Honor of Nat Turner, Lt. Wilson & Bible Talk, Soldier In The Army Of The Lord

    In Honor of Nat Turner, Lt. Wilson & Bible Talk, Soldier In The Army Of The Lord

    Lt. Wilson, Bible Talk, Soldier In The Army Of  Lord 

    • 54 min
    Origins Of Watch Night Service - Tied To Emancipation Proclamation!

    Origins Of Watch Night Service - Tied To Emancipation Proclamation!

    Origins of Watch Night Service! 

    Black Methodists and Baptists celebrate Watch Night, December 31, 1862  the Emancipation Proclamation would go into effect at midnight. The celebration continues in African American churches today, striking a more joyous note than prior repentance Watch Nights. 

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    The first Watch Night was Dec. 31, 1862, as abolitionists and others waited for word — via telegraph, newspaper or word of mouth — that the Emancipation Proclamation had been issued.

    "A lot of it, at least the initial Watch Night, was really many of the free black community," says Lonnie Bunch, director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Yet for a people largely held in bondage, freedom is a powerful idea — and that's what the Watch Night tradition embodies.

     

     

    • 1 hr 11 min

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