100 episodes

Oriental medicine was not developed in a laboratory. It does not advance through double-blind controlled studies, nor does it respond well to petri dish experimentation. Our medicine did not come from the statistical regression of randomized cohorts, but from the observation and treatment of individuals in their particular environment. It grows out of an embodied sense of understanding how life moves, unfolds, develops and declines.


Medicine comes from continuous, thoughtful practice of what we do in clinic, and how we approach that work. The practice of medicine is more — much more — than simply treating illness. It is more than acquiring skills and techniques. And it is more than memorizing the experiences of others. It takes a certain kind of eye, an inquiring mind and relentlessly inquisitive heart.

Qiological is an opportunity to deepen our practice with conversations that go deep into acupuncture, herbal medicine, cultivation practices, and the practice of having a practice. It’s an opportunity to sit in the company of others with similar interests, but perhaps very different minds. Through these dialogues perhaps we can better understand our craft.

Qiological Podcast Michael Max, L.Ac

    • Alternative Health
    • 4.8 • 25 Ratings

Oriental medicine was not developed in a laboratory. It does not advance through double-blind controlled studies, nor does it respond well to petri dish experimentation. Our medicine did not come from the statistical regression of randomized cohorts, but from the observation and treatment of individuals in their particular environment. It grows out of an embodied sense of understanding how life moves, unfolds, develops and declines.


Medicine comes from continuous, thoughtful practice of what we do in clinic, and how we approach that work. The practice of medicine is more — much more — than simply treating illness. It is more than acquiring skills and techniques. And it is more than memorizing the experiences of others. It takes a certain kind of eye, an inquiring mind and relentlessly inquisitive heart.

Qiological is an opportunity to deepen our practice with conversations that go deep into acupuncture, herbal medicine, cultivation practices, and the practice of having a practice. It’s an opportunity to sit in the company of others with similar interests, but perhaps very different minds. Through these dialogues perhaps we can better understand our craft.

    The Spirit of Medicine • Elisabeth Rochat • Qi166

    The Spirit of Medicine • Elisabeth Rochat • Qi166

    There is a kind of poetry to Chinese characters. They gives hints and clues about the names we give to the world. They tell a story. 
    In this conversation with Elisabeth Rochat we explore, like you’d explore bottles of fine wine, some of the meaning and nuance in the characters 意 yi, 通 tong, 命 ming,and 理 li. There are some delicious surprises in this conversation as I’m more conversant with the common meanings of these characters, and Elisabeth’s perspective gives me a whole new appreciation for Chinese language and thought. 
    Listen in to this discussion of characters, medicine and what it takes to be a human being.
     
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Yair Maimon Treating Cancer with Acupucnture

    Yair Maimon Treating Cancer with Acupucnture

    Jing, Qi and Shen— the three treasures. Like so many of these pithy quotes about Chinese medicine there is a lot here if you have taken the time to investigate it and see how it fits within your experience of practicing medicine. 
    In this conversation with Yair Maimon we touch on the three treasures as they relate to treating cancer with acupuncture, immunology from Chinese medicine perspective, and ways of working with research that help us to further our understanding of our medicine here in the modern day.
    Listen in to this discussion that touches both on the classics and modern day perspectives in health and healing.
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 1 hr 6 min
    The Resonant Hum of Yin and Yang • Sabine Wilms • Qi164

    The Resonant Hum of Yin and Yang • Sabine Wilms • Qi164

    Chinese is not that easy, and the 文言文 (wen yan wen) the classical Chinese, that stuff is a whole other order of magnitude in challenge to the modern Western mind.
    And yet if we are going to practice this medicine with deep roots into a long gone time and culture, we need access to the stepping stones that have been handed down to us over centuries through books and writing.
    Translating language is one thing. But translating culture, bringing something of the mind and perception from another time, that is a whole other task.
    It helps if you can understand the poetry, the stories, the world view and beliefs of the time. And it helps if you can track the changes in the meaning of words and ideas across the centuries of commentary.
    In this episode we are sitting down for tea with Sabine Wilms, a self described "lover of dead languages," for a discussion of Resonance from chapter five of the Simple Questions.
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 58 min
    The Path of Journey • Daniel Schulman • Qi163

    The Path of Journey • Daniel Schulman • Qi163

    We venerate the masters, hold them up as shining examples of what we would like to be one some day, but let’s be honest here— most of us will never be masters. Those rarified characters are few and far between. And the process it takes is not one most of us would willing sign up for. We do however have a good shot at being a fine journeyman or journeywoman
    Why it’s hard to become a master? Master’s are usually forged in troublesome fires. They may be living through a time of war and disease and their medicine comes through the crucible of deep suffering. Perhaps they’ve gone through a terrible illness or accident of their own. Or they are acutely sensitive in ways that make every life difficult.
    The journey we take with practicing medicine is not to become like one of the masters we idolize, but to become the practitioner with our particular  slant on the medicine that is our’s to become.
    This episode is a discussion of inquiry over time. The discovery's that come not from understanding a book, but rather from the drip, drip, drip of experience from our clinical work that over time teaches us to focus in a particular way. A process that does not guarantee, but rather sets us up, so that one day we read something in the old books and get it. Get it not with so much with our minds, but rather our heart and being. Because it is something that we have grown into. And so we can better understand the writing of others who have also grown into their experience.
    Listen in for a discussion how to become a good journeywoman or journeyman.
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Spirals, stems and branches • Deborah Woolf • Qi162

    Spirals, stems and branches • Deborah Woolf • Qi162

    Stems and Branches are old Chinese science. Our medicine touches on it, but most of us rely on the more modern perspectives for our clincal work. The Stems and Branches speak to a perspective of the universe and our place in it that is foreign to our minds not because of language and culture, but because we live a world that focus more on humanity than cosmos.
    In this conversation we touch on the influence of numbers, the spiral nature of unfoldment and change, a few things about the Hun and Po that will surprise you, how time and space give us different glimpses into reality and how a sense of playfulness wtih medicine and philosophy just might be a most wise approach.
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Vitality, Attention, & Sensing • Chip Chase • Qi161

    Vitality, Attention, & Sensing • Chip Chase • Qi161

    There are many ways to attend to our patients in clinic. We can work through mental models that we’ve acquired from our schooling, study, and clinical experience. We can also use our innate human ability to touch, palpate and sense.
    In this episode with Chip Chase we discuss the importance of down-regulating our nervous system. Along with the use of palpation and sensing references to anchor our ideas about what might be going on for a patient, and to track the progress of the treatment as it unfolds.
    Additionally we touch in on the use the eight extraordinary vessels and their relation to internal cultivation, take a look at the relatively new emergence of using the divergent channels, and discuss the difference between intending and attending during the treatment process.
     
    Head on over to the show notes page for more information about this episode and for links to the resources discussed in the interview.  

    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

Lucyb2410860 ,

Thoughtful and engaging

Thank you for allowing us to listen to such inspiring conversations. I am in my 1st year of my acupuncture masters in Australia, and currently roadtripping while studying. Your podcast has been a kind friend on these long drives, i cannot say I understand some of it yet, but it is opening me up to the many layers and nuances in this medicine. I would like to learn more on japanese acupuncture if you haven’t already discussed in an episode.

Anisseclare ,

Utmost appreciation from a 1st year student

I am in my first year of TCM in Australia (from a western medicine background) and have found this podcast so comforting. The informal yet so interesting and inquisitive nature is perfect.

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