75 episodes

Scene of the Crime is a podcast hosted by Carolyn Ossorio and Kim Shepard. A nitty-gritty exposé of true crimes in the Pacific Northwest that features a combination of storytelling, reporting, and interviewing experts who were at the Scene of the Crime.

Scene Of the Crime Carolyn Ossorio & Kim Shepard

    • True Crime
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Scene of the Crime is a podcast hosted by Carolyn Ossorio and Kim Shepard. A nitty-gritty exposé of true crimes in the Pacific Northwest that features a combination of storytelling, reporting, and interviewing experts who were at the Scene of the Crime.

    A Conversation with Emily Washines

    A Conversation with Emily Washines

    We've been sharing new stories from the Scene of the Crime for more than a year now and we're starting an ambitious new project, a full-season deep dive into one of the most interesting cases we've covered so far: The mysterious death of Autumn Stone. There's been some movement on this case since we first brought it to you last year, and some new evidence has been uncovered that could change everything!

    So, while we take a short break from our weekly episodes to focus on this deep dive, we thought we would share with you some of the really impactful discussions that we had as we were preparing our last episode on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women.

    First up - our conversation with Emily Washines. She grew up hearing stories about the tragedies that have occured to people in her tribe and beyond. Now, she's using her voice to speak up for the victims and to try and end the cycle of violence and abuse. And, best of all she shares with us stories of courage and compassion that can help us all understand the struggle of Native women and girls and what we can do to help.

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    • 32 min
    MMIW: Silent No More

    MMIW: Silent No More

    Earth Feather Sovereign was just 14 years old, and she was an itty bitty thing. Standing just over five feet tall, she barely hit a hundred pounds on the scale.

    Still, when she walked into the party that night, she stuck out her chin and let them know *she* had arrived. The Portland house belonged to a friend of a friend, she wasn’t really sure who. But, between the bass-heavy beat of the music and the excited energy of the young people milling around, this ** felt like the place to be.

    Even though she was still in the dawn of her teenage years, Earth Feather already had plenty of experience with booze, and not just to liven-up a party. She’d learned the hard way that liquor could soothe a tortured heart, at least temporarily.

    So, just like so many other nights, she grabbed a bottle.

    There were a lot of familiar faces at this house party, but a lot of strangers, too. And, when Earth-Feather went down to the hall to use the bathroom, she wasn’t alone.

    A group of young men grabbed her and refused to let her go.

    She was kidnapped, raped and held as a slave.

    It’s a sickening story that’s all too familiar for so many young Indigenous women all over the nation.

    But now, new laws and new efforts are being made to stop the cycle and find justice for the families of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women from the Pacific Northwest and around the country.

    If you are a family member of a missing person and would like their photo to be included on the Washington State Patrol Missing Person’s website, please contact:

    Missing and Unidentified Persons Unit

    mupu@wsp.wa.gov

    (800) 543-5678

    Or the WSP Tribal Liaisons

    Patti Gosch                                       Dawn Pullin

    patti.gosch@wsp.wa.gov dawn.pullin@wsp.wa.gov

    (360) 280-0567                                (360) 890-0150

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    • 54 min
    The Stranger

    The Stranger

    The Drift Inn Tavern could be seen as drab by some with its dated décor, but to locals in the seaside town of Bremerton, the dive bar was like the tide with folks drifting in and drifting out.

    It’d been that way since the 1950's, and over the years it grew to be more than just a bar. It was a communal watering hole, a place of sustenance for the soul, and a place to be accepted, where the bartender didn’t judge and wasn’t stingy with a pour.

    And in the early 90's, it was exactly what 57 year old Marilyn Hickey was looking for: a place where everyone knew her name.

    And so it was that September night in 1992 this divey version of Cheers welcomed Marilyn, or the “Elvis Lady” as she was called.

    At just five feet tall, Marilyn was shooting the shit as she played pool, her outgoing personality and trusting nature drawing people to her.

    If only she’d been a little bit more suspicious that night as she started talking to a young man. A stranger with collar length reddish-brown hair. Folks later would recall seeing her companion, but nobody knew his name.

    After last call, Marilyn and the young man stumbled out of the Drift Inn together and got in a cab. They drove for just over a mile before they were dropped off at Marilyn’s apartment.

    It would be the last time Marilyn was seen alive. Her body would be found with scissors plunged through her heart. The only clue was the sketch of that stranger, who seemed to have disappeared without a trace.

    That is, until new technology revved up a case that had gone ice cold.

    A DNA profile found at the Scene of the Crime matched DNA from the scene of another brutal murder. Two years after Marilyn’s death, Cheryle Barratt, was found stabbed, sexually assaulted and slashed to death.

    After almost 30 years would two cold case detectives finally get some justice for not only Marilyn, but Cheryl too?

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    • 1 hr 6 min
    Family Secrets

    Family Secrets

    Children should be seen and not heard. That's what she was told. And Alene was a good little girl. So, she went back to playing in the corner, while the grown ups leaned in closer, speaking in hushed tones, murmuring about the family secret: a woman named Beatrice Roscorla Andrewartha.

    Beatrice grew up in Cornwall, in the South West of England, around the turn of the 20th century. She was a beautiful, elegant woman - tall and slender with a halo of dark curls, bright eyes, and a gentle smile.

    The widow of a gold miner, Beatrice had been left with a small fortune and a desire to see the world. So, when her brother also lost his spouse and asked if she would move to Michigan to help him care for his three young daughters, Beatrice found herself on a ship bound for America.

    She spent many happy years with her brother's family, before the girls grew up and moved away to start families of their own. And, Beatrice once again found herself alone and wanting to see the world. This time, she planned to head to the West Coast and then North, to visit family in Canada.

    It was a bold move in 1919, for a woman to travel across the country without a chaperone. Maybe that's why the honeyed words of a well-dressed stranger sounded so tempting. He wanted to whisk her away to India, Asia and Australia; all the exotic places she'd been dreaming of, but didn't think she'd ever really see.

    It was a whirlwind romance between Beatrice and the gentleman on the train. Just a few weeks later they were married and making plans to honeymoon in Hawaii.

    To a curious little girl in the 1950's, eavesdropping on her mother's conversation, it all sounded like a fairytale.

    So, Alene didn't understand why it was such a closely guarded secret, why she'd never heard of Beatrice before, and why no one wanted to explain what happened to her after that whirlwind romance.

    It was a curiosity that stuck with Alene her entire life, until she unearthed a letter written to her grandfather in 1922 by an inmate at San Quinten. It was just the first breadcrumb along a trail that would lead Alene to one of the most prolific serial killers in our nation's history, a psychopath willing to do just about anything to get what he wanted... and NEARLY got away with it.

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    • 50 min
    Justice for Jason

    Justice for Jason

    In the fall of 2020, Jason Fox was a 19 year old kid who had grown up in Newport, Washington.  The small city is a gorgeous slice of PNW pie complete with mountains, rivers, and forests. Everything the Evergreen State is famous for.

    But Jason, a creative, loving and kindhearted kid, was harboring a secret. He worried if he revealed it he wouldn’t be accepted, and like most teens, acceptance was the thing he craved more than anything else.

    And he was right to be concerned. Newport, a conservative place near the Idaho border, is more red than blue when it comes to its politics.

    Jason came out when he was 18 years old, sort of. In a move to be more accepted, Jason told Newport friends he was bisexual. He thought that would be easier than telling the truth: that he was gay.

    When Jason was 19 he started experimenting with drugs. His parents were worried, not only about the drugs but about a new, older crowd he was hanging out with. People he had a troubling history of clashing with.

    Even so, a couple friends from that group invited him to party at the Timber River Ranch, about five miles outside of town. By day the ranch was over 50 acres of rustic beauty and tranquility. But the night that Jason rolled down the long, dirt driveway he was never so alone and isolated. Jason’s parents believe that’s exactly why he was lured to this location.

    Jason sent a text just after midnight on September 15th, 2020. It was the last text he would ever send.  Three weeks later his body was found in a shallow grave.

    Four men have been charged with murder in connection with his murder. But, the motive is unclear. Jason's mom believes it was a hate crime.

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    • 1 hr 19 min
    Family Ties

    Family Ties

    Ashley Pond may have been a pre-teen, but instead of spunk and rebellion, she emanated sweetness and light. Despite the abuse she’d suffered at the hands of her father, the 12 year old from Oregon City was known to be a happy child who loved to dance.

    In fact, she was on a dance team with some of her closest friends and neighbors, Miranda and Mallori. The trio lived so close, they all met-up at the same bus stop each morning, before heading to Gardner Middle School, where they were in 7 th grade.

    On the morning of January 9 th , 2002, Ashley was running a little late. She rushed out the door at 8:15, hoping she hadn’t missed the bus. Some neighbors remember seeing Ashley as she hustled out of the apartment complex that morning… the last time anyone would see her alive.

    And, Ashley wouldn’t be the last of her friends to be stolen….

    We're exploring the question of Nature versus Nurture with a family that includes three generations of killers. But, is this evil being passed along in their genes? Or was it the way they were raised?

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    • 48 min

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