290 episodes

Creating eco-minimalist, non-toxic homes (without the extra work).



Although minimalism has experienced a rebirth in recent years, the "less is more" movement has been around for centuries. Yet today's minimalist influencers have resurrected minimalism with a decidedly consumerist spin, as modern minimalism is nearly synonymous with decluttering. While there's a lot of chatter about tidying, it's radio silence and crickets when it comes to sustainability. 



The result? Aspiring minimalists find themselves on an endless hamster wheel of buying, decluttering, buying more, and purging again. Overemphasizing decluttering and underemphasizing the reasons why we overbuy in the first place is thoroughly inconsistent with slow living as a movement; consumption without intention is terrible for the planet, too. 



Your host, Stephanie Seferian, is a stay-at-home/podcast-from-home mom and author who believes that minimalism, eco-friendliness, and non-toxic living are intrinsically intertwined. She's here to explore the topics of conscious consumerism, sustainability, and environmentally-friendly parenting practices with like-minded women; she's here, too, to show you how to curate eco-friendly, decluttered homes (without the extra work). 

Sustainable Minimalists Stephanie Seferian

    • Leisure
    • 4.7 • 47 Ratings

Creating eco-minimalist, non-toxic homes (without the extra work).



Although minimalism has experienced a rebirth in recent years, the "less is more" movement has been around for centuries. Yet today's minimalist influencers have resurrected minimalism with a decidedly consumerist spin, as modern minimalism is nearly synonymous with decluttering. While there's a lot of chatter about tidying, it's radio silence and crickets when it comes to sustainability. 



The result? Aspiring minimalists find themselves on an endless hamster wheel of buying, decluttering, buying more, and purging again. Overemphasizing decluttering and underemphasizing the reasons why we overbuy in the first place is thoroughly inconsistent with slow living as a movement; consumption without intention is terrible for the planet, too. 



Your host, Stephanie Seferian, is a stay-at-home/podcast-from-home mom and author who believes that minimalism, eco-friendliness, and non-toxic living are intrinsically intertwined. She's here to explore the topics of conscious consumerism, sustainability, and environmentally-friendly parenting practices with like-minded women; she's here, too, to show you how to curate eco-friendly, decluttered homes (without the extra work). 

    Low-Waste Lunchboxes

    Low-Waste Lunchboxes

    "One of the hardest things we haven’t been able to tackle is our kids' snacks: we still end up using a good amount of single use plastic wraps. Do you have any ideas?"



    Citing convenience, ultraprocessed foods are often sold in single-serve packs. But such snack and lunch items are overpriced (you're literally paying for that extra plastic!); they're also often unhealthy for both people and the planet.

    I get it: We're overtired and overstressed, and packing wholesome foods can feel like yet another daunting chore. That's why on today's show I answer a listener's question about how to pack low-waste lunchboxes without the extra stress (dozens of food ideas included!).



    Here's a preview:

    [1:30] What recent research says about the health effects of ultraprocessed foods on human health

    [7:00] The premiums we pay for foods packaged in single-serve plastics

    [11:30] 5 quick tips for managing picky eaters

    [17:30] The Bento Box route versus the traditional lunchbox: pros, cons, and gear recommendations

    [24:00] 30+ low-waste lunchbox ideas



    Resources mentioned:

    Episode #173: How To Simplify Picky Eating
    Leeann's FREE virtual event signup
    Eating Processed Foods Tied to Shorter Life (via NY Times)
    Ultraprocessed Food Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Among Participants of the NutriNet-Santé Prospective Cohort (via Journal Of The American Medical Association)
    Homemade Cereal Bars (recommended by listener Elsa)
    Say hello! Email Stephanie at MamaMinimalistBoston@gmail.com or leave a voicemail at (857) 264-1967 (US and Canada listeners only)
    * Find your tribe. Sustainable Minimalists are on Facebook, Instagram + Youtube.


    Lunchbox gear that listeners love:

    Lunchbots stainless steel Bento Box (recommended by Lauren)
    Planet Box stainless steel Bento Box (recommended by Elsa)
    Sistema plastic containers (recommended by Sara)
    Packit lunchbox (recommended by Sara)
    Reusable sandwich container, preferably stainless steel (recommended by Patricia)
    Wean Green reusable glass containers (recommended by yours truly)
    Foogo thermos (recommended by yours truly)


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    Thank you to our sponsors!

    Made Trade: Shop the best sustainable goods all in one place at madetrade.com
    Thrive Market: Head to thrivemarket.com/sustainable for up to $80 in free groceries
    Skillshare: Visit skillshare.com/sustainable for your first month free

    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/sustainable-minimalists/exclusive-content

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    • 31 min
    Introcast: The NewsWorthy

    Introcast: The NewsWorthy

    I hope you'll enjoy The NewsWorthy as much as I do! Check it out.

    • 2 min
    Defend The Eco-Trend: Closed Loop Consumption

    Defend The Eco-Trend: Closed Loop Consumption

    Is the future refillable?

    When we look at the history of plastics, it's disheartening to realize that only 9% of all plastics ever created have been recycled. Another 12% has been incinerated; a whopping 79%, then, has accumulated in landfills and nature.

    That's right: your Bonnie Bell Lip Smacker tube circa 1995 is quite likely still somewhere on this planet.

    Refillable products (like ice cream in stainless steel jars and shampoo bottles refilled in-store) aren't new. But while most people say they want eco-friendly product options, their purchasing behaviors sing a different tune. Consumers tend to prioritize convenience over eco-friendliness, time and time again.

    Today I speak with Izzy Zero Waste Beauty founder Shannon Goldberg about closed loop consumption. Is packaging the problem, or does the problem lie within our consumption?

    Here's a preview:

    [6:00] 2 major barriers to mainstream refillables

    [11:00] Do refillable products *actually* make a dent in our trash production? What about our oversized environmental woes?

    [15:00] Refillable products and next-level greenwashing: Why we must expand our collective definition of waste to account for excess carbon emissions from sending back our products

    [20:00] Are refillable options sanitary in a post-COVID world?



    Resources mentioned:

    Loop global reuse platform
    Use code IZZYF20 at yourizzy.com for 20% off (Thanks, Shannon!)

    --

    Thank you to our sponsors!

    Thrive Market: Head to thrivemarket.com/sustainable for up to $80 in free groceries
    Skillshare: Visit skillshare.com/sustainable for your first month free
    Better Help: Visit betterhelp.com/sustainable for 10% off your first month

    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/sustainable-minimalists/exclusive-content

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    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 23 min
    Climate Reparations?

    Climate Reparations?

    A hotter planet is here, my friends. Don't believe me? Just turn on the news.

    On today's show we first break down major current climate events; we then ask ourselves a set of ethical quandaries. Should the global north pay reparations to the global south for its centuries-long polluting behaviors, or are the inequitable and unjust natures of climate change simply bad luck? 



    Here's a preview:

    [4:00] How'd summer go? (Hint: not great, especially in Pakistan)

    [12:30] The climate reparations argument: What it is and why it has legs

    [20:00] 3 ethical questions for you to answer re: charity versus reparations

    Resources mentioned/Further reading:

    Advocates Call On U.S. To Help Flooded Pakistan In The Name Of Climate Justice (via National Public Radio)
    A Hotter World: Climate Change’s Effects Are Already Unequal (via NY Times)
    Send me your Exit Ticket answers! Email Stephanie at MamaMinimalistBoston@gmail.com or leave a voicemail at (857) 264-1967 (US and Canada listeners only)
    Join our private (and super cool) Facebook group. It's free!
    Episode #165: Difficult Sustainability Conversations
    Episode #143: How To Discuss The Effects Of Climate Change

    Thank you to our sponsors!

    Made Trade: Shop the best sustainable goods all in one place at madetrade.com
    Thrive Market: Head to thrivemarket.com/sustainable for up to $80 in free groceries
    Skillshare: Visit skillshare.com/sustainable for your first month free


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/sustainable-minimalists/exclusive-content

    Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 22 min
    Life's Changing Seasons

    Life's Changing Seasons

    When it comes to growing up, we tend to believe it's only for children. Adults, then, are assumed to be fully grown.

    But even us "grownups" are constantly changing, maturing, and evolving (and often at a rapid pace). Such inner changes also run concurrent with external ones that pop up as we move through our respective life seasons, day after day.

    If embracing change as life's only true constant is downright difficult, getting stuck underneath heaps of possessions that served our out-of-date versions makes such an embrace even harder. And what about jobs that are no longer fulfilling, relationships that are no longer harmonious, and life views that are no longer synchronous with the person we are evolving into? It's likely enough to make your head spin.

    Today I speak with life coach Jenny Cheifetz about loosening our grips on the past, embracing changes in both our lives and in ourselves, and letting go of our need to hold onto what was. In the first part of our conversation we speak on possessions; in the second, we discuss first steps to decluttering the big intangibles we know on the soul level we've outgrown.


    Here's a preview:

    [2:30] The internal pause: how and why to conduct a needs assessment

    [6:30] Why attaching emotion to possessions ultimately does us a disservice

    [11:30] 'Store it at the store' is about to become your new mantra and here's why

    [15:00] How to conduct a needs assessment with with your big but intangible baggage

    [19:00] Thoughts on 'flow' as a state of being, plus why we as humans are prone to white-knuckle grips


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    Thank you to our sponsors!

    Thrive Market: Head to thrivemarket.com/sustainable for up to $80 in free groceries
    Skillshare: Visit skillshare.com/sustainable for your first month free

    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/sustainable-minimalists/exclusive-content

    Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 18 min
    Materialism's Sweet Spot

    Materialism's Sweet Spot

    "Much of the time I tell my kids that material possessions aren't that important, but I also want them to take care of the possessions they have. How should I best juggle these messages and still get my points across?"



    As sustainable minimalists, we want our children to devalue stuff, as we certainly don't want them to associate their sense of self-worth with what they own. But at the same time we also want them to care for their existing possessions even though such care requires a certain amount of 'stuff' reverence.

    It's a real paradox: On one hand we preach that stuff doesn't matter, but on the other we shout from the rooftops that stuff matters an awful lot and we best take care of it.

    Amidst such conflicting messages, what's a child to believe?

    On today's show I'm answering a listener's question about the sweet spot between the two extremes of materialism and reckless ownership.

    Here's a preview:

    [6:30] 2 parenting practices that result in materialistic children, according to research

    [12:00] Best behaviors when bringing children into brick-and-mortar stores

    [17:45] The how and why behind letting your child experience the natural consequences of their actions

    [24:30] Parents, beware of these two research-backed materialist beliefs

    [27:00] How to behave (and what to emphasize) when you buy new items for your children

    [33:00] The sweet spot lies in these 3 quiet, simple, and non-grandiose habits that parents model every day

    --

    Resources mentioned/Further reading:

    The 3 Parenting Strategies That Cause Kids to Become Materialistic (via Very Well Family)
    Say hello! Email Stephanie at MamaMinimalistBoston@gmail.com or leave a voicemail at (857) 264-1967 (US and Canada listeners only)


    --

    Thank you to our sponsors!

    Made Trade: Shop the best sustainable goods all in one place at madetrade.com
    Thrive Market: Head to thrivemarket.com/sustainable for up to $80 in free groceries
    Skillshare: Visit skillshare.com/sustainable for your first month free

    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/sustainable-minimalists/exclusive-content

    Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
47 Ratings

47 Ratings

Pbjelly94 ,

Gives me that extra level I’m craving!

Thank you Stephanie for your incredible podcast.
I have been a sustainable minimalist for many years and love learning more, I love how your podcast dives deeper than just how many towels you should have in your linen closet. I have learnt so much and have been bingeing the episodes after discovering it a few years post launch.

I LOVE that there is no intro I need to skip, you speak so clearly, you do not talk over your guests, you do not use filler words and I can hear your smile in each episode. Please keep doing what you’re doing!

Angela JD ,

Absolute Favourite Podcast!

This is my absolute favourite podcast! Since finding it I went back to the beginning and listened to all of the episodes.
Such relevant topics - you always seem to know what I want and need to know!
Stephanie you speak so well, and more often than not make me laugh - I love your honesty.
I look forward to new episodes dropping and never miss one.
Thankyou and keep going!

Lise.Hart ,

My favourite sustainability podcast

This is one of my favourite easy-listening (and at the same time thought-provoking) podcasts, Stephanie delves into so many interesting topics as a sustainable minimalist. At first I was concerned that they may mostly be focused on just sustainability in relation to parenting but most of the advice is applicable to everyone looking to be more mindful of their impact on the planet, and on their wallets.

Thanks for creating such a great show Stephanie!
-Lisa, Western Australia

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