20 episodes

Sydney Screen Studies Network Talks is a research-led podcast covering all aspects of film, television, and screen-based media. Scholars and graduate students from Sydney share their research, discuss screen culture and history, and debate the latest film and television releases and technology. This podcast is made possible by the kind support of the School of the Arts & Media, UNSW Sydney. Visit sydneyscreenstudies.wordpress.com/podcast for archived episodes and more info.

Sydney Screen Studies Talk‪s‬ Sydney Screen Studies Network

    • Courses

Sydney Screen Studies Network Talks is a research-led podcast covering all aspects of film, television, and screen-based media. Scholars and graduate students from Sydney share their research, discuss screen culture and history, and debate the latest film and television releases and technology. This podcast is made possible by the kind support of the School of the Arts & Media, UNSW Sydney. Visit sydneyscreenstudies.wordpress.com/podcast for archived episodes and more info.

    Common Ground: Australian co-productions with China

    Common Ground: Australian co-productions with China

    Over the past decade, the Australian film industry has increasingly engaged in co-productions with China. Screen Australia’s 2013 'Common Ground' report into screen partnerships in Asia highlighted Australia’s intention to develop co-production relationships in the region. Its support of Arclight Films’ Chinalight company in the 2017 round of the Enterprise program funding, gave this intention a physical, development and production company presence that made the hope clear that a stronger relationship with China, its industry and film market was the primary goal. Dr Dave Hare examines the recently-closed Chinalight as a case study that reflects the ways Australia is approaching the China-Australia production relationship. He is joined by Kai Ruo Soh to chat about the various political, cultural and financial implications of this relationship, with the audience present on the day.

    Seminar: 0.00 - 40min Q & A: 40min - 1hr 30min

    Produced by the Sydney Screen Studies Network
    Visit our website: sydneyscreenstudies.wordpress.com
    Email us: sydneyscreenstudies@gmail.com

    • 1 hr 32 min
    Through an Indigenous Lens

    Through an Indigenous Lens

    Throughout Australia’s television history, Indigenous people have faced considerable misrepresentation in both their characterization and absence from our screens. Graduate student and actress Josie Atkinson looks at three key case studies: Boney (1971-2; 1992) Neighbours (1985-), and The Secret Life of Us (2001-5), revealing that while problems still exist in the representation of Indigenous people in televised media dramas, there have been some groundbreaking developments in this facet of Australian media.

    Josie is joined by Evelyn Araluen Corr for a Q&A session, where they discuss the issues facing Indigenous actors/actresses, gender representation, and the presence and absence of Indigenous-specific and Indigenous non-specific characterization in Australian television.

    Seminar: 0.00 - 14min
    Q & A: 14min - 1hr 02min

    Produced by the Sydney Screen Studies Network
    Visit our website: sydneyscreenstudies.wordpress.com
    Email us: sydneyscreenstudies@gmail.com

    • 1 hr 3 min
    A Good Man with a Gun

    A Good Man with a Gun

    "The only thing that can stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun". These are words spoken by NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary school massacre. Film scholar Dr Rodney Wallis argues this statement has a peculiar resonance with the mythic ideal of an armed saviour in American culture. He explores how Hollywood has contributed to this ideal through the 1950s Western, particularly focusing on George Steven's 1953 movie Shane. He is joined by Ben Eldridge for a Q&A session, in which they chat about heroism, masculinity, gun culture, race and gender in the Western genre.

    Seminar: 0.00 - 16min
    Q & A: 16min - 1hr 02min

    Produced by the Sydney Screen Studies Network Visit our website: sydneyscreenstudies.wordpress.com Email us: sydneyscreenstudies@gmail.com

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Icons and Politics in Spanish Cinema

    Icons and Politics in Spanish Cinema

    What cultural and social value can be found in 1970s exploitation cinema? Doctoral candidate Váleri Codesido explores 1970s Spanish exploitation cinema to question what it can tell us about Spain in both a pre- and post- Franco era, and Spain's relationship with the world, through its explicit portrayal of sex and violence. Váleri also proposes that aesthetic parallels can be found in the Ozploitation films of the 1970s, opening up further questions around the stark differences in Australia's and Spain's political and cultural histories. Váleri is joined by Assoc. Prof. Anne Rutherford (WSU) for a Q & A with the audience present on the day.

    Seminar: 0.00 - 22min
    Q & A: 22min - 1hr 13min

    Produced by the Sydney Screen Studies Network
    Visit our website: sydneyscreenstudies.wordpress.com
    Email us: sydneyscreenstudies@gmail.com

    • 1 hr 13 min
    The Female Hero: The Research-led Screenplay

    The Female Hero: The Research-led Screenplay

    The Hero's Journey has proven highly adaptable to the three-act screenplay structure. The problem is it has almost exclusively been applied to masculine heroes. Screenwriter Sophia Riley Kobacker proposes a new narrative template that can be used to tell the story of a more authentic female Hero's Journey. The new template is designed to encourage the production of future female-protagonist-led films. Screenwriter and academic Dr Natalie Krikowa joins Sophia for a Q & A session with the audience present on the day.

    Seminar: 0.00 - 22min
    Q & A: 22min - 1hr 13min

    Produced by the Sydney Screen Studies Network
    Visit our website: sydneyscreenstudies.wordpress.com
    Email us: sydneyscreenstudies@gmail.com

    • 1 hr 13 min
    Fassbinder: As He Appears to Us

    Fassbinder: As He Appears to Us

    Director, performer or author? UNSW Honours student Zach Karpinellison interrogates these three roles occupied by German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder. These roles, Zach argues, allow Fassbinder to exert greater control over the moral and political reception of his work. He also explores the filmmaker's important cultural value as both an auteur and a key figure in New German Cinema. Dr Michelle Langford joins Zach for a Q&A after his talk.

    Produced by the Sydney Screen Studies Network
    Visit our website: sydneyscreenstudies.wordpress.com
    Email us: sydneyscreenstudies@gmail.com

    • 1 hr 4 min

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