157 episodes

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Annisa Beta present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

Talking Indonesia Talking Indonesia

    • News
    • 4.2 • 18 Ratings

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Annisa Beta present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

    Sidney Jones - Terror and Extremism

    Sidney Jones - Terror and Extremism

    In late March, Indonesia faced two terror attacks in the space of a week, with a husband and wife conducting a suicide bombing against a cathedral in Makassar, and a woman attacking Indonesian police headquarters carrying an Airsoft gun. Indonesian police described the perpetrators of both attacks as supporters of the Islamic State or ISIS – the group’s supporters have been responsible for a string of attacks in Indonesia over the past five years, albeit mostly causing few fatalities, including attacks in Indonesia’s two main cities Jakarta and Surabaya in 2016 and 2018.

    What do these recent attacks tell us about the nature of the terrorist threat in Indonesia, and how is this threat changing? Are ISIS supporters the main threat to Indonesian security or are longer-established organisations such as Jemaah Islamiyah emerging anew? Why have terrorist attacks in Indonesia persisted despite the imprisonment of hundreds of terrorist perpetrators? And how well have Indonesian authorities responded to the threat of terrorism and extremism.

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues with Sidney Jones , director of the Jakarta-based Institute for the Policy Analysis of Conflict or IPAC, a world leading expert on jihadi terrorism in Southeast Asia.

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Annisa Beta from the University of Melbourne’s School of Culture and Communication, Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.

    Photo credit: Didik Suhartono for Antara Foto

    • 38 min
    Kurniawati Hastuti Dewi - The Women's Movement After 1998

    Kurniawati Hastuti Dewi - The Women's Movement After 1998

    International Women’s Day was celebrated on 8 March. It aims to commemorate the cultural, political, and socioeconomic achievements of women and bring attention to issues such as gender equality, reproductive rights, and violence against women. Since the fall of Soeharto, the Indonesian women's movement has been instrumental in pushing for affirmative action policies that have promoted women's participation in politics, and have successfully advocated for policies to protect the rights of women, such as the 2004 Law on Domestic Violence. At the same time, however, major challenges remain, particularly in maternal health, violence against women and discrimination. In Indonesia, as elsewhere, women are raising their voices and calling for improvements to women’s safety and equality.

    What has been achieved in terms of women’s rights and equality in the post-authoritarian era in Indonesia? Are more women entering politics and what impact are they having? What are the issues driving the women’s movement today?

    In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jemma Purdey speaks to Dr Kurniawati Hastuti Dewi a senior researcher at the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), about Indonesia’s women’s movement and its role in bringing about social and political change.

    Kurniawati Hastuti Dewi is a senior researcher at Center for Political Studies, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI). Her research interests are in the areas of gender and politics, women and politics, gender and decentralization. She received her MA in Asian Studies from the Australian National University (2007) and PhD from the Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies (ASAFAS) Kyoto University Japan (2012). Her doctoral dissertation was published as a book, Indonesian Women and Local Politics: Islam, Gender and Networks in Post-Suharto Indonesia (Singapore: National University of Singapore Press & Kyoto University Press, 2015). Her latest research explores the usage of motherhood identity in the 2019 Indonesian presidential election was published as ‘Motherhood Identity in the 2019 Indonesian Presidential Elections: Populism and Political Division in the National Women’s Movement’, Contemporary Southeast Asia vol. 42, no. 2 (2020): 224-250. She is Secretary General of Asian Association of Women's Studies (AAWS, 2020-2022).

    © 2018 BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images

    • 33 min
    Dr. Santi Kusumaningrum - Covid-19 and children and vulnerable populations

    Dr. Santi Kusumaningrum - Covid-19 and children and vulnerable populations

    What are effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on children and vulnerable populations in Indonesia? As most schools and educational institutions have been closed for more than a year, many children have to shelter in places that may not always be ideal. The pandemic has also restricted opportunities for children and vulnerable populations to express their concerns and participate in public. Who has been affected the most? What can we do about the issues children and vulnerable individuals face? To shed light on these issues, in this episode, we are joined by Dr. Santi Kusumaningrum, the Director of Puskapa (Centre for Child Protection and Wellbeing at University of Indonesia). Photo by M Agung Rajasa for Antara.

    • 30 min
    Dr Evi Sutrisno - Confucianism

    Dr Evi Sutrisno - Confucianism

    In this Lunar New Year special episode, Dr Charlotte Setijadi chats with Dr Evi Sutrisno about the history and evolution of Confucianism in Indonesia, from its beginnings as a belief system for ethnic Chinese migrants to its recognition as one of the country's six official religions.

    • 33 min
    Dr Adrianus Hendrawan - Getting Elected

    Dr Adrianus Hendrawan - Getting Elected

    The December 2020 elections for mayors and governors marked the beginning of Indonesia’s fourth wave of direct local elections. Mayors and governors have been directly elected by popular vote since 2005, replacing a previous system of indirect election by local legislatures that was widely perceived as corrupt. Most candidates though are still nominated by coalitions of political parties, as provisions for independent candidates in place since 2008 are very difficult to navigate. What are the keys to winning these local elections? Do the party coalitions that candidates form shape their chances of winning, or the way that they govern afterwards? Have the ways in which local leaders won office shaped their response to the Covid-19 pandemic? And are changes now needed to the electoral system to improve the functioning of these elections and local governance?

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues with Dr Adrianus Hendrawan , a recent PhD graduate from the Australian National University who is currently engaged in research with ANU on women’s representation in local legislatures. In addition to his PhD research , Adrianus has co-authored a range of articles on local elections and local governance with several other colleagues: on ‘Parties as pay-off seekers’ ; on ‘Incumbency advantage and the performance of second term mayors’ ; and on ‘The impact of majority coalitions’ .

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Annisa Beta from the University of Melbourne’s School of Culture and Communication, Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.

    Photo credit: Indrianto Eko Suwarso for Antara Foto

    • 39 min
    Dr Ines Atmosukarto - COVID-19 and the vaccine

    Dr Ines Atmosukarto - COVID-19 and the vaccine

    Dr Ines Atmosukarto - COVID-19 and the vaccine

    Over the past few months, the Covid-19 crisis in Indonesia has escalated, with daily case numbers and deaths from the virus hitting record levels week after week. Without strict lockdowns, government efforts to encourage the public to comply with social distancing and masking advice has not been effective in controlling the spread of the disease.  

    On 13 January, President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo received the first dose of the CoronaVac vaccine, manufactured by Chinese firm Sinovac, after interim data from phase III trials in late 2020 found that the vaccine is 65.3% effective. The vaccine trials and rollout across the world has been shrouded in some controversy, and the vaccine's reception in Indonesia has been mixed. As the government embarks on one of the largest vaccination programs in its history, what are the challenges? Is it taking the right approach, and will the vaccine do its job and arrest the pandemic in Indonesia?  

    To explore these questions and more, Dr Jemma Purdey chats to Dr Ines Atmosukarto, a molecular biologist from the John Curtin School of Media Research at the ANU’s College of Health and Medicine. Ines is CEO of Lipotek Pty Ltd which develops vaccines and cancer treatments, and was previously project leader at the Research Centre for Biotechnology at the Indonesian Institute of Science (LIPI). 
    To shed light on these questions and more I am joined by Dr Ines Atmosukarto a molecular biologist from the John Curtin School of Media Research at the ANU’s College of Health and Medicine. Ines is CEO of Lipotek Pty Ltd which develops vaccines and cancer treatments and she was previously Project Leader at the Research Centre for Biotechnology at the Indonesian Institute of Science (LIPI).

    PHOTO: ANTARA FOTO

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

mockingjoanne ,

Good content, but...

This podcast is very informative and fascinating to listen to, in terms of the subjects covered, but the host often presents very basic questions and I find him very flat and dull. It’s a nice podcast but it needs more grit and expression to be more interesting.

hotheathot ,

The guests are interesting

Generally interesting guests who are very knowledgable about Indonesia. The presenters sound like robots.

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