191 episodes

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Jacqui Baker and Tito Ambyo present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

Talking Indonesia Talking Indonesia

    • News
    • 4.3 • 21 Ratings

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Jacqui Baker and Tito Ambyo present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

    Dr Chris Chaplin - The Salafi Movement

    Dr Chris Chaplin - The Salafi Movement

    Indonesian Islam has long been lauded as tolerant and "moderate". It is this moderate character that has enabled Indonesia – the world's largest Muslim-majority country – to become a flourishing democracy, unlike many Muslim-majority countries in the Persian Gulf region. But recent years have seen rising Islamic conservatism in Indonesia, a trend that some scholars have called the "Arabisation" of Indonesian Islam.

    Conservative Islamic social movements have long had a foothold in Indonesia, but they have surged in the more open political environment of the post-authoritarian era. Salafism is one such movement, a puritanical school of Islamic thought connected to Saudi Arabia.

    Why has Salafism grown in popularity, especially among young Indonesians? How have Salafis promoted their teachings? What do they want, politically and economically? How is Salafism changing the face of Islam in Indonesia and, potentially, being changed in turn?

    In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jacqui Baker explores these questions and more with Dr Chris Chaplin from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Dr Chaplin recently published a book on the Salafi Islamic movement in Indonesia: Salafism and the State: Islamic Activism and National Identity in Indonesia.

    Photo by Chris Chaplin.

    • 30 min
    Dr Elisabeth Kramer - Political Candidates and 'Anti-Corruptionism'

    Dr Elisabeth Kramer - Political Candidates and 'Anti-Corruptionism'

    Dr Elisabeth Kramer - Political candidates and anti-corruptionism

    Indonesia has announced it will conduct its next general elections on 14 February 2024, to select a new president and vice president, and members of the national, provincial and district legislatures. This will be the largest electoral event in Indonesia’s history, with more candidates campaigning at the same time than ever before.

    In past elections, fierce electoral competition has seen many candidates resort to vote buying (or "money-politics") to give them an edge in their campaigns. But a small number of candidates make the choice to take a risk and run against the status quo on a platform of "anticorruptionism".

    Why is money politics so prevalent in Indonesian election campaigns? Why would a candidate choose to run on an anti-corruption platform, and do they have a chance of winning if they do? What does it all mean for the future of Indonesia’s democracy? In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Jemma Purdey explores these questions and more with Dr Elisabeth Kramer, deputy director of the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre (SSEAC), Sydney University and author of The Candidates Dilemma: AntiCorruptionism and Money Politics in Indonesian Electoral Campaigns.

    In 2022, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne, Dr Jacqui Baker from Murdoch University, and Tito Ambyo from RMIT.

    Image: Antara Foto

    • 37 min
    Associate Professor Dirk Tomsa - Democratic Regression and the Environment

    Associate Professor Dirk Tomsa - Democratic Regression and the Environment

    Taking care of the environment in Indonesia, which has one of the highest levels of biodiversity in the world, is a massive challenge. Covid-19 has intensified this challenge, presenting new threats and accentuating old ones. The democratic regression and post-truth politics that have become a feature of Indonesia over recent years are also directly and indirectly resulting in more damage to the environment.

    How, exactly, are post-truth politics and democratic regression affecting environmental protection in Indonesia? How has the Indonesian government acted to address environmental problems, and has its efforts been successful? Is democracy the best political system for the environment?

    In Talking Indonesia this week, Tito Ambyo talks with Dr Dirk Tomsa, former Talking Indonesia host and Associate Professor of Politics at La Trobe University. Dr Tomsa has recently commissioned a survey on Indonesians’ attitudes on the environment and has found some surprising results.

    • 38 min
    Dr I Gede Wahyu Wicaksana: Indonesia's G20 Presidency

    Dr I Gede Wahyu Wicaksana: Indonesia's G20 Presidency

    In 2022, Indonesia holds the rotating presidency of the Group of 20 (G20) a forum of 19 of the world’s major economies along with the EU. Indonesia has assumed the presidency at a time when the forum is bitterly divided over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine – in April, western finance officials walked out of a G20 meeting when Russian delegates were speaking. Facing calls to exclude Russia from the G20 leaders’ summit in Bali in November, Indonesia instead opted to extend an invitation to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, despite Ukraine not being a member of the group.

    Indonesia's priority issues for its G20 presidency are global health architecture, sustainable energy transition, and digital transformation, under the overall rubric of “Recover Together, Recover Stronger”. But what effect will the war in Ukraine have on Indonesia's ability to pursue this agenda? How might the presence in Bali of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukraine President Zelensky – if both men attend – shape the leaders’ summit? How important, in any case, is the G20 to the Indonesian government, and to powerful political and business interests in the country?

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae chats with Dr I Gede Wahyu Wicaksana, senior lecturer in the Department of International Relations at Universitas Airlangga in Surabaya.

    In 2022, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Dave McRae from the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society at the University of Melbourne, Dr Jacqui Baker from Murdoch University, and Tito Ambyo.

    Photo credit: www.kremlin.ru

    • 37 min
    Dr Alexander Arifianto - Nahdlatul Ulama's leadership

    Dr Alexander Arifianto - Nahdlatul Ulama's leadership

    Indonesia’s largest Muslim organisation, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), claims membership of 40 to 45 million people, and has long occupied a highly significant position in Indonesian society and politics. One of its most high-profile leaders (and Indonesia’s fourth president), Abdurrahman Wahid, remains a symbol for pluralism, remembered for his role in the struggle for democratic reform under the New Order. Today, NU members hold key ministerial and administrative positions in the government of President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo.  

    As Indonesian democracy shows signs of decline, what is NU’s role? How does it continue to defend its position as a ‘moderate’ Muslim organisation and advocate for pluralism? How will its new leader, Yahya Cholil Staquf, direct the organisation’s focus ahead of the 2024 elections? 

    In Talking Indonesia this week Dr Jemma Purdey discusses these questions and more with Dr Alexander R. Arifianto, a Research Fellow with the Indonesia Program at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS), Nanyang Technological University. 

    In 2022, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne, Dr Jacqui Baker from Murdoch University, and Tito Ambyo from RMIT.

    Image: Hafidz Mubarak A/Antara

    • 36 min
    Dr Jess Melvin & Dr Annie Pohlman - Aceh's Truth and Reconciliation Commission

    Dr Jess Melvin & Dr Annie Pohlman - Aceh's Truth and Reconciliation Commission

    In 2005, in the wake of Aceh’s devastating tsunami, the Indonesian government signed the Helsinki Peace Agreement, drawing to a close a thirty-year conflict with the Free Aceh Movement (GAM), which sought independence for the province.

    That agreement committed the parties to establishing a truth and reconciliation commission, designed to examine the abuses that occurred during the conflict and offer restitution to its victims. But it was not until 2016 that the Aceh Truth and Reconciliation Commission (KKR) was finally established, and this only occurred after constant agitation by activists and victims.

    Over the past five years, the commission has travelled the province, taking testimonies from some 5,000 victims of human rights abuses, leading toward a final report that is set to be released this year. What will the report reveal about the patterns and experiences of violence during the conflict? Who perpetrated the violence and who were the main victims? How will the report affect Acehnese politics and society, and more broadly, Indonesia?

    In Talking Indonesia this week, new host Dr Jacqui Baker talks with historians Dr Jess Melvin from the University of Sydney and Dr Annie Pohlman at the University of Queensland. Dr Melvin and Dr Pohlman are among a group of activists and academics collaborating with the commission to produce the final report.

    In 2022, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Jacqui Baker from Murdoch University, Dr Dave McRae from the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society at the University of Melbourne, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, and Tito Ambyo from RMIT.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

mockingjoanne ,

Good content, but...

This podcast is very informative and fascinating to listen to, in terms of the subjects covered, but the host often presents very basic questions and I find him very flat and dull. It’s a nice podcast but it needs more grit and expression to be more interesting.

hotheathot ,

The guests are interesting

Generally interesting guests who are very knowledgable about Indonesia. The presenters sound like robots.

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