136 episodes

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Dirk Tomsa present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

Talking Indonesia Talking Indonesia

    • News
    • 4.4, 14 Ratings

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Dirk Tomsa present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

    Ligia Giay - Racism

    Ligia Giay - Racism

    In the wake of these US protests triggered by the murder of George Floyd in May in Minneapolis, a #PapuanLivesMatter discourse has emerged in Indonesia, scrutinising racism against the indigenous populations of Indonesia’s two easternmost provinces, Papua and West Papua, site of a protracted conflict for independence between the Indonesian government and sections of Papuan society. #PapuanLivesMatter itself follows on from the massive, sustained anti-racism protests in Papua in August and September 2019, after Papuan students studying in Surabaya and Malang in East Java found themselves the target of racial abuse in the days leading up to Indonesia’s independence day.

    To discuss racism towards Papuans, its impacts and drivers, I’m joined today by Ligia Giay, a PhD candidate at the Asia Research Centre at Murdoch University in Perth, and a frequent author on racism against Papuans. She is also part of the team that runs the Voice of Papua newsletter: https://voiceofpapua.substack.com/.

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.

    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

    Photo credit: Raisan Al Farisi for Antara Foto

    • 27 min
    Dr Wayan Suriastini - Covid-19 and Mental Health - Policy in Focus

    Dr Wayan Suriastini - Covid-19 and Mental Health - Policy in Focus

    The mental health impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic are generally assumed to be severe, but little data has been available to assess the situation in Indonesia. Indonesian survey firm SurveyMETER has conducted an online survey to measure the incidence of anxiety and depression during the Covid-19 crisis. In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses the survey with Dr Wayan Suriastini, Executive Director of SurveyMETER. Keep an eye on the SurveyMETER website for the results of the survey discussed in today’s episode, as well as future polls.

    Today’s episode is the latest in the “Policy in Focus” series of Talking Indonesia episodes, supported by the Knowledge Sector Initiative (KSI), a partnership between the Australian and Indonesian governments that aims to improve the use of evidence in development policymaking. This series will appear periodically in alternate weeks to the regular Talking Indonesia episodes. The views expressed in this podcast episode do not represent the views of the Australian or Indonesian governments.

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Associate Professor Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.

    Photo credit: Siswowidodo for Antarafoto

    • 31 min
    Dr Pandu Riono - Covid-19 and public health responses

    Dr Pandu Riono - Covid-19 and public health responses

    Dr Pandu Riono - Indonesia's pandemic

    In early March as the pandemic quickly spread across the world and its neighbours rushed to close their borders and economies, Indonesia’s Minister for Health Terawan Agus Putranto told local media he couldn’t understand what all the fuss was about, describing the coronavirus as less dangerous than the flu.

    Indonesia did not record its first official case of COVID-19 until 2 March and would not issue its PSBB or lockdown orders until the end of the month and in some provinces even later. Meanwhile, since January epidemiologists at the University of Indonesia and from other institutions across the country were working behind the scenes to convince the government that the pandemic posed a major threat to the country’s inadequate and fragile heath services and infrastructure.

    Fast forward to June 2020 as lockdown restrictions are being eased and official numbers of cases and deaths ascribed to COVID-19 remain well below those earlier predictions and estimates but continue to trend upward, with some of the biggest daily totals of new cases recorded in the past week.

    Why are Indonesia’s case numbers relatively low? Is the testing regime and data analysis adequate? Have the government’s PSBB or social distancing regulations been successful? And how that restrictions are being lifted, what does the future hold?

    My guest today is Dr Pandu Riono an epidemiologist from the Faculty of Public Health at the University Indonesia and a member of a team of researchers who carried out some of the earliest modelling of the pandemic in Indonesia.

    http://staff.ui.ac.id/priono
    @drpriono Twitter

    Photo: Courtesy Central Java Provincial Public Relations

    • 39 min
    Dr Puspa Delima Amri - Covid-19 and the Indonesian economy

    Dr Puspa Delima Amri - Covid-19 and the Indonesian economy

    As the Covid-19 virus wreaks havoc across Indonesia, the World Bank predicts that Indonesia’s economy may shrink by as much 3.5 percent this year. The government is now pushing ahead to reopen the economy to prevent further weakening by easing restrictions in areas where infection rates are under control. How badly has the Covid-19 pandemic affected Indonesia’s economy so far, and which sectors and sections of society have been impacted the most? Is the government’s push to reopen the economy premature? What can the government do to mitigate the spread of Covid-19 while also minimizing the damage to the economy? To analyse the situation, Dr Charlotte Setijadi spoke to Dr Puspa Delima Amri, an Assistant Professor of Economics at Sonoma State University.

    • 32 min
    Joanna Octavia: Covid 19 & Informal Sector Workers - Policy In Focus

    Joanna Octavia: Covid 19 & Informal Sector Workers - Policy In Focus

    Across the world, the International Labour Organisation has highlighted the significant impacts lockdown policies have had on 1.6 billion informal workers, concentrated in low and middle income countries like Indonesia. The differing effects of Covid-19 responses on informal sector workers and those in formal employment is a massive issue for Indonesia, where more than half of the workforce works in the informal sector. How have informal sector workers coped during the Covid-19 crisis in Indonesia, and what is the Indonesian government doing to assist them?

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues with Joanna Octavia, Visiting Fellow at Centre for Strategic and International Studies Indonesia, and a PhD Candidate at the Warwick Institute for Employment Research. She is the author of the recent CSIS Commentary, Towards a national database of workers in the informal sector: COVID-19 pandemic response and future recommendations.

    Today’s episode is the latest in the “Policy in Focus” series of Talking Indonesia episodes, supported by the Knowledge Sector Initiative (KSI), a partnership between the Australian and Indonesian governments that aims to improve the use of evidence in development policymaking. This series will appear periodically in alternate weeks to the regular Talking Indonesia episodes. The views expressed in this podcast episode do not represent the views of the Australian or Indonesian governments.

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Associate Professor Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.
    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight.

    Photo credit: Aditya Pradana Putra for Antara Foto

    • 30 min
    Febriana Firdaus and Max Walden - Reporting Covid-19

    Febriana Firdaus and Max Walden - Reporting Covid-19

    Many foreign media outlets have been highly critical of the Indonesian government’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Most of the Indonesian media, by contrast, seems far less inclined to question the government’s statistics and policy announcements. What explains this discrepancy in reporting standards? Are Indonesian journalists self-censoring because the space for dissent is shrinking in Indonesia? Are foreign journalists exaggerating the extent of the crisis?

    In today’s podcast, Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these and other questions with Febriana Firdaus, an Indonesian freelance journalist currently based in Bali, and Max Walden, a reporter and producer with the ABC Asia Pacific Newsroom in Melbourne and a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne’s Asian Law Centre.

    In 2020, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Deakin University, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from Singapore Management University and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

    Photo credit: ANTARA FOTO/Dhemas Reviyanto/foc.

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
14 Ratings

14 Ratings

mockingjoanne ,

Good content, but...

This podcast is very informative and fascinating to listen to, in terms of the subjects covered, but the host often presents very basic questions and I find him very flat and dull. It’s a nice podcast but it needs more grit and expression to be more interesting.

hotheathot ,

The guests are interesting

Generally interesting guests who are very knowledgable about Indonesia. The presenters sound like robots.

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