145 episodes

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Dirk Tomsa present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

Talking Indonesia Talking Indonesia

    • News
    • 4.2 • 17 Ratings

In the Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae, Dr Jemma Purdey, Dr Charlotte Setijadi and Dr Dirk Tomsa present an extended interview each fortnight with experts on Indonesian politics, foreign policy, culture, language and more. Find all the Talking Indonesia podcasts and more at the Indonesia at Melbourne blog.

    Dr Vina Adriany - Covid-19 and Early Childhood Education

    Dr Vina Adriany - Covid-19 and Early Childhood Education

    According to Unicef, more than 60 million students in Indonesia have been temporarily out of school due to COVID-19, presenting the country’s education sector with unprecedented challenges. How have schools responded to these challenges? How have children and parents reacted? And what are the likely long-term implications of prolonged home schooling for Indonesian children?

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, we chat about the impact of Covid-19 on early childhood education in Indonesia. Joining host Dirk Tomsa is Dr Vina Adriany, the Head of the Department of Early Childhood Education at the School of Graduate Studies at Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia in Bandung.

    In 2020, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.
    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

    Photo credit: ANTARA FOTO/Didik Suhartono/hp.

    • 28 min
    A/Prof. Marcus Mietzner - the Soekarno dynasty

    A/Prof. Marcus Mietzner - the Soekarno dynasty

    A/Prof Marcus Mietzner - the Soekarno dynasty

    The Soekarno dynasty is arguably Indonesia’s first and certainly most successful political family – able to count two presidents and the country’s largest political party, PDI-P - as its legacy, so far. Soekarno himself, was the nation’s founding father and first president and his daughter, Megawati, its fifth and to date, only female president from 2001-2004. Today Megawati continues to lead the family party, which has played a significant role in Indonesia’s democratic consolidation.

    However, with the matriarch, Megawati, failing twice in her attempts to re-capture the presidency, in 2014 the decision was made to put forward a ‘proxy’ nominee for the party’s presidential bid. As history tell us, their choice, Joko Widodo, proved a very good one. Now, six years later, with Jokowi in his second and final term, the issue of a successor is once more on the table, and with it questions about the ability of the Soekarno dynasty to regenerate and hold on to its power.

    What are the characteristics that have seen the Soekarno dynasty survive and thrive for three generations? What are the challenges of regeneration facing the Soekarno family? Has the dynasty weakened its own position by its decision to elevate Joko Widodo to the presidency? And as members of the president’s own family seek to enter politics via the upcoming regional elections (Pilkada), is Jokowi looking to create a political dynasty of his own to rival that of the Soekarnos?

    To talk about these questions and more, our guest this week is A/Prof Marcus Mietzner, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU. He has written extensively on the Sukarno dynasty and the PDI-P, including, ‘The Sukarno dynasty in Indonesia: Between institutionalisation, ideological continuity and crises of succession’ SEAR, Volume: 24 issue: 3, page(s): 355-368.

    In 2020, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Jemma Purdey from the Australia-Indonesia Centre, Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

    Image: Marcus Mietzner, November 2013

    • 42 min
    Damar Juniarto - Digital Attacks on Activists and the Media

    Damar Juniarto - Digital Attacks on Activists and the Media

    Recent years in Indonesia have seen repeated instances of the hacking of activists’ social media accounts, the defacing of media websites, as well as the activities of political influencers and automated bots attacking critics and promoting a pro-government line. On top of these digital attacks, the Indonesian government also twice throttled or shutdown the internet in 2019, first in Jakarta and subsequently in Papua.

    Digital attacks on activists and the media raise a host of questions: who is responsible for these attacks, what effect do they have on Indonesian democracy, and what reforms are needed to better protect Indonesian internet users?

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues with Damar Juniarto, Executive Director of the Southeast Asia Freedom of Expression Network (SAFEnet)

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.

    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight.

    Photo credit: Wahyu Putro A for Antara Foto

    • 33 min
    Dr Lis Kramer & Ele Williams - Indonesia Australia Public Diplomacy

    Dr Lis Kramer & Ele Williams - Indonesia Australia Public Diplomacy

    The relationship between Indonesia and Australia has not always been smooth, but the people of the two countries have mostly supported each other during times of crises. What is the state of Indonesia-Australia relations during these times of increasing international detachment and the defunding of public diplomacy programs? What are some of the contemporary challenges faced by those trying to foster public diplomacy programs between the two countries? Charlotte Setijadi spoke about the history and current state of Indonesia-Australia people-to-people relations with Dr Lis Kramer and Ms Ele Williams.

    • 33 min
    Professor Laksono Trisnantoro - Indonesia's National Health Insurance Scheme - Policy in Focus

    Professor Laksono Trisnantoro - Indonesia's National Health Insurance Scheme - Policy in Focus

    Launched in 2014 and aiming to provide universal healthcare coverage, Indonesia’s national health insurance scheme, JKN, has gradually increased its membership to 220 million people, or 84 per cent of the Indonesian population. Nevertheless, questions remain about the equality of access to healthcare and quality of treatment that JKN members receive in different parts of the country. The financial sustainability of the scheme also remains an ongoing issue, with the healthcare fund’s deficit reaching Rp 28 trillion rupiah (approximately A$2.5 billion ) in 2019, a significant burden for the government even prior to the severe economin downturn caused by Covid-19.

    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses these issues, as well as the impact of Covid-19 on Indonesia’s national health insurance scheme, with Professor Laksono Trisnantoro, Head of the Department of Health Policy and Management in the Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing at Universitas Gadjah Mada . Professor Laksono headed a team from the Centre of Health Policy and Management that produced a recently published evaluation of the national health insurance scheme in 13 of Indonesia’s 34 provinces . Professor Laksono is a second time guest on Talking Indonesia, having appeared in 2016 to discuss the earlier development of JKN.

    Today’s episode is the latest in the “Policy in Focus” series of Talking Indonesia episodes, supported by the Knowledge Sector Initiative (KSI), a partnership between the Australian and Indonesian governments that aims to improve the use of evidence in development policymaking. This series will appear periodically in alternate weeks to the regular Talking Indonesia episodes. The views expressed in this podcast episode do not represent the views of the Australian or Indonesian governments.

    The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Associate Professor Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.
    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight.

    Photo credit: Ampelsa for Antara Foto

    • 38 min
    Dr Vannessa Hearman - Transnational Human Rights Activism

    Dr Vannessa Hearman - Transnational Human Rights Activism

    In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Indonesia was estimated to have between 55,000 and 100,000 political prisoners as a result of the Army-led anti-communist violence of the mid-1960s. Some of these prisoners maintained long-lasting epistolary friendships with supporters and human rights activists overseas. Who initiated these friendships and how did they evolve over time? What kind of broader support networks for political prisoners emerged out of this letter writing? And what legacy did this activism leave for contemporary human rights campaigners?
    In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, we take a closer look at one of these epistolary friendships. Joining host Dirk Tomsa is historian Dr Vannessa Hearman, a Senior Lecturer in Indonesian Studies at Charles Darwin University in Darwin, and the author of 'Unmarked Graves: Death and Survival in the Anti-Communist Violence in East Java, Indonesia', which was recently awarded the 2020 Early Career Book Prize by the Asian Studies Association of Australia.
    In 2020, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University.
    Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

    Photo courtesy of Vannessa Hearman

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

mockingjoanne ,

Good content, but...

This podcast is very informative and fascinating to listen to, in terms of the subjects covered, but the host often presents very basic questions and I find him very flat and dull. It’s a nice podcast but it needs more grit and expression to be more interesting.

hotheathot ,

The guests are interesting

Generally interesting guests who are very knowledgable about Indonesia. The presenters sound like robots.

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