300 episodes

Save more and spend less is more than just a motto for money expert Clark Howard; it’s a way of life. Clark and his crew — Team Clark — are on a mission to empower people to take control of their personal finances by providing money-saving tips, consumer advice, hot deals and economic news to help everyone achieve financial freedom.

Clark is a nationally syndicated radio talk show host and a consumer reporter for television stations around the country. His podcast, The Clark Howard Show, receives more than one million downloads each month and is a hub for listeners to get valuable advice on-demand any time. Clark answers questions on the most popular business and consumer topics including; how to buy a cars, financing a home, retirement planning, shopping for insurance and getting the most out of your savings. Join the conversation and submit your question to www.clark.com/askclark .

Clark spearheads two free resources — Clark.com and ClarkDeals.com — to encourage consumers to save more, spend less and avoid ripoffs.

The Clark Howard Podcast Clark Howard

    • Investing

Save more and spend less is more than just a motto for money expert Clark Howard; it’s a way of life. Clark and his crew — Team Clark — are on a mission to empower people to take control of their personal finances by providing money-saving tips, consumer advice, hot deals and economic news to help everyone achieve financial freedom.

Clark is a nationally syndicated radio talk show host and a consumer reporter for television stations around the country. His podcast, The Clark Howard Show, receives more than one million downloads each month and is a hub for listeners to get valuable advice on-demand any time. Clark answers questions on the most popular business and consumer topics including; how to buy a cars, financing a home, retirement planning, shopping for insurance and getting the most out of your savings. Join the conversation and submit your question to www.clark.com/askclark .

Clark spearheads two free resources — Clark.com and ClarkDeals.com — to encourage consumers to save more, spend less and avoid ripoffs.

    1.24.20 Clark's self-installed $8 a month security system; Clark Stinks

    1.24.20 Clark's self-installed $8 a month security system; Clark Stinks

    Clark’s quote for a modern home security system came in at $2700 + $25 a month monitoring or $300 a year. Meanwhile, Clark’s been touting self-install systems for years so he decided to give it a try. Clark looked at Nest, Ring and Simply Safe on cost and features. Clark bought the Ring system for $179 on sale at Costco, complete with motion sensors, sound alarm, enough door/window coverage & keypad. He already had Ring doorbells and cameras that would fully integrate - $100 a year for professional monitoring.

    Christa reads listener posts about how Clark has missed the mark in his advice this week. If you have a "Clark Stinks" to share you can leave it here.
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    • 38 min
    1.23.20 Planning for retirement; Employer pays off employee mortgage; Income share agreements instead of student loans

    1.23.20 Planning for retirement; Employer pays off employee mortgage; Income share agreements instead of student loans

    Clark discusses the expenses many retirees don't consider when they are planning for retirement. Some call them "stealth expenses." It's important to have a plan as you get closer to your retirement date and to have your eyes open about what your incoming and outgoing funds will look like.

    An auto shop owner paid off his long-time employee's mortgage to help him retire. How cool is that!?

    More and more universities are offering income share agreements. This means that graduates will pay a portion of their salary for quite a few years post graduation. It's a different approach to the traditional student loan market.
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    • 38 min
    1.22.20 Internet privacy law for minors; Paper check fraud grows; Socially responsible investing

    1.22.20 Internet privacy law for minors; Paper check fraud grows; Socially responsible investing

    Other than recent initiatives in California, the U.S. is lagging when it comes to internet privacy protections. This spring, strict online privacy rules for anyone under 18 will go into effect in Britain. For underage citizens, personal information will be private. If a kid is using YouTube, Google can’t track that use. No tracking, data mining or subsequent targeted advertising to kids can take place. We need such a law in the U.S. In addition to Google and Facebook, gaming companies, and other social media are using our kids as fodder to develop massive databases for targeted ads. Naturally adults should have privacy rights as well. Affected companies are under so much pressure to grow revenue, the moral ethical equation gets pushed aside. These are powerful companies that can buy off U.S. politicians to work in their favor. We should have clear privacy protections for children. The British are using a market-based approach, allowing users to set up default privacy settings for all users, or go through a process of age verification. And this has real teeth. If a company violates the law, the fine is 4% of their worldwide revenues. That’d be gigantic for Facebook or Google. At last, a strong way to deal with reckless big tech.

    An American Bankers Association survey finds that attempted check fraud has gone up 60% in the last 2 years. One of the great vulnerabilities in the banking system is a traditional paper checks – an analog device that does not provide adequate security in a modern digital era – already banned in some countries. If you routinely carry a checkbook with you, stop doing so. If a single check of yours falls into the wrong hands, the danger to you is can include jail time for check fraud. Also business are a big target for check fraud. It’s safer to operate electronically.

    Lots of investors are becoming interested in socially responsible investing. They don’t want their retirement money going into ‘bad’ companies. But the criteria is hard to define. Tobacco, alcohol, soft drinks, coal, oil are company areas some define as bad. Environmental, social and governance (ESG) investing principles is one criteria, but can be defined very differently among fund managers. Before you choose a socially responsible fund, understand how that is defined. It may omit companies you champion. Facebook is loved by some investors. Others love to hate it. Also, when you start slicing and dicing, you shrink the pool of companies eligible to be part of an investment. Before you jump into this, see how ‘socially responsible’ is defined by the fund choice available to you. And look at the expenses. Often investment houses will charge more in expenses for these funds.
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    • 38 min
    1.21.20 Natural gas prices plummet; Restore faith in Capitalism; Hottest job markets

    1.21.20 Natural gas prices plummet; Restore faith in Capitalism; Hottest job markets

    In some states people are able to shop their natural gas service. Regardless of state, know that natural gas prices have collapsed. Projections are this will be a mild winter, with an oversupply of natural gas available. The price at wholesale has collapsed to now 1/8th of what it was just 15 years ago. Other than electronics, prices tend to move up over time. But energy has gone way down. If you live in a state where you can negotiate, this is a time to shop the market. With prices this low, lock in for 2 years if allowed. In states with no choice, the good news is that generally wholesale costs are passed on to consumers. Overall, energy prices have steadily gone down, making the case for deregulation. Many states are under a corrupt process wherein politicians decide who will provide electricity and what they charge. Better to emulate the free market system used in Texas, creating very low energy costs as the market provides the most efficient energy available. In the case of Texas, overwhelmingly it’s wind power. In D.C - hot air.

    A new survey reveals a basic distrust of capitalism has taken hold among Americans. Public-relations firm Edelman conducted its 20th annual analysis of public trust in major institutions, surveying 34,000 people in 27 countries and Hong Kong. Here we are in the midst of a long economic expansion begun in 2012, yet the majority surveyed no longer believe in capitalism. Americans are down on the free enterprise system. No one was ever punished for the banking scandals of last decade. Income inequality also undermines faith in the system. But becoming a socialist paradise doesn’t tend to play out well over time. We need to improve how capitalism works in the U.S. We have much to fix. The reality is nothing in human history has ever worked as well as giving people the opportunity to create new ideas, products or services people want to buy, creating greater wealth for both society and those individuals.

    If you’re willing to move, you can benefit from job opportunities across the nation. Economic opportunities abound in other cities and states for people of all sorts of different work backgrounds.
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    • 38 min
    1.20.20 Even wealthy Americans struggling with debt; What to know about store closings and liquidation sales

    1.20.20 Even wealthy Americans struggling with debt; What to know about store closings and liquidation sales

    A Bankrate survey has found that of those with $100k to $200K net worth, more than half are carrying credit card debt. The psychology of this is important. There’s an old expression that describes this: Keeping up with the Joneses. When someone lives in an affluent neighborhood and drives an older car, they may feel like the odd person out, and seek to buy a new one to fit in. It feels only natural to match the environment. It’s a matter of being too influenced by those around us, and creating expectations for ourselves. This mentality takes hold in an insular culture. We are influenced by others, often in positive ways. But when it comes to possessions, trouble follows. Remember that those who have the greatest net worth are those that live a modest life, seemingly below their means. They are building long term wealth. Nobody ever got rich paying Visa or Mastercard 18% interest on debt.

    The Christmas season was rough for many retailers as evidenced by store vacancies happening all over America. The U.S. has been ‘over-stored’ for years, with more retail space per person than elsewhere in the world. A correction has begun. Retailers are closing for many reasons, leading to GOB (going out of business) sales. Know that these sales are not necessarily a deal for you. The companies that specialize in running these liquidation sales are expert at manipulating buying behavior. Much of the merchandise in a given GOB comes from previous clearance sales, designed to give the perception you’re getting a great deal. Know that most of the discounts are an illusion. If you shop a GOB, let your smartphone be your friend. Use it to price check and comparison shop.
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    • 38 min
    1.17.20 Cars that people keep at least 15 years; Clark Stinks

    1.17.20 Cars that people keep at least 15 years; Clark Stinks

    Vehicles are one of the largest purchases in life. To protect your finances, drive your car till the wheels fall off. Certain vehicles stand the test of time.

    Christa reads listener posts about how Clark has missed the mark in his advice this week. If you have a "Clark Stinks" to share you can leave it here.
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    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

rammette69 ,

Wonderful personality and down to earth personal finance advice

Even though I'm Australian, I listen to these everyday to inspire me to save and make great financial decisions.

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