298 episodes

Founded in 1962, Film Comment has been the home of independent film journalism for over 50 years, publishing in-depth interviews, critical analysis, and feature coverage of mainstream, art-house, and avant-garde filmmaking from around the world. Our podcast is a weekly space for critical conversation about film, with a look at topical issues, new releases, and the big picture. Film Comment is a nonprofit publication that relies on the support of readers. Support film culture and subscribe today.

The Film Comment Podcast Film Comment Magazine

    • TV & Film
    • 4.3 • 4 Ratings

Founded in 1962, Film Comment has been the home of independent film journalism for over 50 years, publishing in-depth interviews, critical analysis, and feature coverage of mainstream, art-house, and avant-garde filmmaking from around the world. Our podcast is a weekly space for critical conversation about film, with a look at topical issues, new releases, and the big picture. Film Comment is a nonprofit publication that relies on the support of readers. Support film culture and subscribe today.

    At Home #16: Devika Girish and Clinton Krute

    At Home #16: Devika Girish and Clinton Krute

    It’s been a while since we did a new episode in our Film Comment Podcast: at Home series. Let me assure you that’s not because we’ve stopped watching movies or even left the house for that matter. So FC Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold got together again with my colleagues to talk about the latest selection of home viewing that’s been occupying our pandemicized brains. We discussed the shock of the present moment and how it’s changed, and then we talked about movies spanning cinema verite and what used to be called cyberspace, as well as a fair share of animals on screen. I was joined by all-star Film Comment editorial colleagues: Film Comment Digital Editor Clinton Krute and Assistant Editor Devika Girish. We discuss films like the Maysles Brothers’ Salesman, Hong Sangsoo’s Tale of Cinema, The Matrix, Greg Mottola’s The Daytrippers, Mike Nichols’ The Day of the Dolphin, Roar, and, um, Tiger King, among others. Stay safe, and thank you for all of your support.

    If you’re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2

    • 58 min
    At Home #15 - Ashley Clark and Eric Hynes

    At Home #15 - Ashley Clark and Eric Hynes

    In more normal times, this week’s podcast might have been a Rep Report, reviewing some of the riches screening in New York’s art-house theaters. I’ve spent more happy hours than I could possibly count at those theaters, with certain years defined by landmark retrospectives and rare screenings of one sort or another. Film Comment has been lucky to count many of the programmers at these theaters as contributors to the magazine and the podcast. And so for our latest episode, FC Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold checks in with two keepers of the flame: Eric Hynes, curator at Museum of the Moving Image, and writer of our Make It Real column on nonfiction; and Ashley Clark, director of film programming at BAM in Brooklyn. The three talk about steering theaters through this difficult time, and the movies and the 25-year-old baseball games that have kept them in good spirits. And fair warning: there is talk about Tron.

    If you’re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2

    • 1 hr 4 min
    At Home #14 - Critics David Bordwell and Imogen Sara Smith

    At Home #14 - Critics David Bordwell and Imogen Sara Smith

    We’re always happy to welcome two outstanding scholars to the Film Comment Podcast, and you’ve probably already read their criticism or heard them on a DVD or streaming commentary. David Bordwell last joined us to discuss his book Reinventing Hollywood, and of course his books are staples of film studies courses and his regular film blog with Kristin Thompson is a sharp and inquisitive resource. Critic Imogen Sara Smith is our other returning guest, a regular contributor to Film Comment and an all-star contributor at Criterion and elsewhere. Among her beautifully composed and observed essays, she’s written about Christian Petzold for us and on the podcast, reflected on the phenomenon of ghosts in cinema. Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold welcomed David and Imogen back for a discussion that ranges from fascinating rediscoveries in Japanese cinema to the inflammatory film The Hunt.

    If you’re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2

    • 59 min
    At Home #13 - The Cinema Worker Solidarity Fund’s Nellie Killian and Ed Halter

    At Home #13 - The Cinema Worker Solidarity Fund’s Nellie Killian and Ed Halter

    An inspiring development during the pandemic has been watching people pull together to help one another and especially those hit hardest. One such effort was the Cinema Worker Solidarity Fund, which raised nearly $80,000 in 10 days for out-of-work movie theater employees. For our latest edition of The Film Comment Podcast at Home, Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold caught up with programmer-critics Ed Halter and Nellie Killian, who spearheaded the Cinema Worker Solidarity Fund alongside Thomas Beard and filmmaker Sierra Pettengill. Halter, a critic in residence at Bard College, is also co-curator of Light Industry with Thomas Beard, and Killian is a contributing editor of Film Comment. Halter and Killian last appeared together on an incredible podcast talking about Projections, the experimental film slate of the New York Film Festival. This time, the three talked about the effects of the crisis on how we watch movies, what we’ve been watching, and the interesting overlaps between our ultra-mediated existence and experimental cinema. Films discussed include Claude Lanzmann’s Shoah, Listen to Britain, Fail Safe, The Day After, and more.

    If you’re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2

    • 52 min
    At Home #12 - Critic Jonathan Romney

    At Home #12 - Critic Jonathan Romney

    We begin another week with The Film Comment Podcast at Home, keeping ourselves distracted and hopefully our listeners too. One big way the crisis is affecting the movie business is that it’s also another week without new theatrical releases. That might be the least of our concerns, but it’s definitely been food for thought among critics and other moviegoers. On this episode, Film Comment Editor-in-Chief talked to our weekly critic, Jonathan Romney, who has been adapting his output for the current situation, and that goes for his intake. Nic reached him in London, where he’s weathering the crisis at home like the rest of us with a liberal mix of movies and television. The two discuss Sergei Loznitsa's My Joy, Bojack Horseman, The Larry Sanders Show, Babylon Berlin, and Zia Anger's My First Film, among others.

    If you’re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2

    • 54 min
    True/False Film Fest 2020

    True/False Film Fest 2020

    Right now, movie theaters are temporarily closed, and we’ll have to wait a while before we can all sit together again and look up at the big screen. But before the curtain dropped on moviegoing, Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold made his annual pilgrimage to the True/False Film Fest. True/False is a reliably energizing festival of nonfiction film, curating the best from around the world. It’s also a place to take the Film Comment Podcast on the road, taking part in Toasted, the late-night event that closes out the festival. This year, Rapold spoke with another rotating lineup of filmmakers, critics, and film professionals, about movies at the festival as well as the nitty-gritty of filmmaking and working with people in front of and behind the camera.

    Among the films discussed are Garrett Bradley’s Time; Khalik Allah’s IWOW I Walk on Water; Ra’anan Alexandrowicz’s The Viewing Booth; Daniel Hymanson’s So Late So Soon; and Sky Hopinka’s Malni: Towards the Ocean, Towards the Shore. Rapold was joined by an ever-changing lineup including Hymanson and Hopinka, critic Dessane Lopez Cassell, filmmaker Mustafa Rony Zeno, and more. Finally Please bear in mind that this was recorded before a live audience at Cafe Berlin. Special thanks to Em Downing of True/False for keeping the show running.

    If you’re a longtime Film Comment subscriber, listener, or reader, or are just tuning in now, please consider becoming a member or making a donation to our publisher, Film at Lincoln Center, during these unprecedented times: purchase.filmlinc.org/donate/contribute2

    • 1 hr

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Danny the Greek ,

Echoes in the Cinema

Film Comment has the reputation of being one of the best film journals in the English language. That means that the producers of this podcast often have access to some of the best filmmakers in the business. What's frustrating, however, is the smug and often peurile opinions and attitudes envinced by many of the critics invited to speak. Too often the podcast is undergraduate in the worst sense - insular, self-indulgent and pretentious - and it can have the feel of listening in to people congratulate themselves on sharing the same aesthetics, fashion and politics. It needs a greater variety of voices and it needs more contributions by people who love film more than they love film theory.

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