25 episodes

Perhaps you're a lover of literature or just love book chat of any kind; perhaps you're an aspiring author or illustrator; perhaps you're someone who hopes one day to work in publishing. If you fit any of these descriptions, this is one podcast you may want to subscribe to. In 2021, we'll be sharing our love of books and publishing throughout the year, starting with podcast episodes based on our new book How to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia by Georgia Richter and Deborah Hunn. Your hosts will be marketing and communications manager Claire Miller and publisher Georgia Richter, with guest appearances from editor Armelle Davies and Deborah Hunn, plus industry professionals Nada Backovic, Rowena Morcom, Leanne Hall, Jane Parkhill, Gavin Burbidge and Lesley Reece. Readers won't be left out either. Our exciting new hosts for 2021 will be the winner of the 2020 City of Fremantle Hungerford Award, Maria Papas, and an as yet unknown Fogarty Literary Award winner. They'll undertake extended interviews with many of our 2021 authors to find out more about their books, their lives and their writing habits. Stay tuned by subscribing and stay in touch @FremantlePress.

The Fremantle Press Podcast Fremantle Press

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Perhaps you're a lover of literature or just love book chat of any kind; perhaps you're an aspiring author or illustrator; perhaps you're someone who hopes one day to work in publishing. If you fit any of these descriptions, this is one podcast you may want to subscribe to. In 2021, we'll be sharing our love of books and publishing throughout the year, starting with podcast episodes based on our new book How to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia by Georgia Richter and Deborah Hunn. Your hosts will be marketing and communications manager Claire Miller and publisher Georgia Richter, with guest appearances from editor Armelle Davies and Deborah Hunn, plus industry professionals Nada Backovic, Rowena Morcom, Leanne Hall, Jane Parkhill, Gavin Burbidge and Lesley Reece. Readers won't be left out either. Our exciting new hosts for 2021 will be the winner of the 2020 City of Fremantle Hungerford Award, Maria Papas, and an as yet unknown Fogarty Literary Award winner. They'll undertake extended interviews with many of our 2021 authors to find out more about their books, their lives and their writing habits. Stay tuned by subscribing and stay in touch @FremantlePress.

    How to be an Author: Fremantle Press unpacks the secret of selling books to booksellers

    How to be an Author: Fremantle Press unpacks the secret of selling books to booksellers

    By his calculations, Penguin Random House account manager Gavin Burbidge attempts to place 432 books into Australian bookstores per month. Across the publishing industry, that means your book will be competing against thousands of titles and your account manager’s pitch could be less than ten seconds long. For a deep dive into sales, Penguin Random House account managers Gavin Burbidge and Jane Parkhill join Claire and Georgia on the How to be an Author podcast. Meanwhile the final Comma Chameleon episode is all about the Macquarie Dictionary’s Word of the Year and Georgia and Claire discuss the relative merits of featuring cats vs dogs, and gerbils vs Hugh Jackman in your author publicity shots.



    Topics discussed:Competition for shelf spaceHow many titles your book competing withKey promotions times for authorsThe Macquarie Dictionary’s word of the yearTips for authors on how to work with booksellersWhat does a typical sell-in look like?



    The How to Be an Author editions of the Fremantle Press podcast are an informal series of chats between publishing industry professionals. Co-hosted by Marketing and Communications Manager Claire Miller and Publisher Georgia Richter, it features regular guest appearances by editor Armelle Davies, as the Comma Chameleon, special publishing industry guests and top tips from contributors to the book How to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia.



    Show NotesExtend your podcastHow to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia by Georgia Richter and Deborah Hunn is available in all good bookstores and online. Between its pages you’ll find everything you need to know about the business of being a writer from people who live and breathe books.



    Connect with Georgia and many of the contributors to the book and podcast in the Facebook group.



    GuestsGavin Burbidge and Jane Parkhill are both account managers for Penguin Random House Australia.



    Author tipBrendan Ritchie is a writer and filmmaker from Fremantle, WA. In 2015 he published his debut novel, Carousel, and was awarded a PhD in Creative Writing. Carousel has been critically acclaimed and is longlisted for the 2016 Gold Inky Award. The sequel, Beyond Carousel, was released to critical acclaim in 2016. In addition to writing, Brendan spends his time lecturing across a range of creative disciplines.



    Organisations, books and people discussedBooks for Cooks



    Chickensaurus by James FoleyCollins BookstoresHugh JackmanMacquarie DictionaryMatthew RileyMoira CourtNatasha Lester

    • 40 min
    Helen Milroy presents: Stellarphant creator James Foley discusses how he made the leap from day job to full-time author

    Helen Milroy presents: Stellarphant creator James Foley discusses how he made the leap from day job to full-time author

    James Foley says the transition from a part-time day job to making a living from his craft was huge and he does not recommend any one quit their job, overnight, on a whim. It took James 14 years to get himself to the point of earning an income from his work as an author/illustrator. In the meantime, he says he was standing on two icebergs: one was his day job, the other his creative work. He says, ‘after a while, the two icebergs started to drift apart and I was doing the splits, and I can’t do the splits, so I had to choose between books and the day job … I was stubborn. I was not going to not make books.’



    Listen to the whole podcast to learn more about James’ journey and his new book Stellarphant.



    Topics discussed:Benefits of reading to kidsDiplomacy and the editor/creator relationshipPros and cons of being a writer and an illustrator, not one or the otherSelf-care for writersTo quit or not to quit the day jobTrusting that your inspiration will return



    Show Notes



    About the host



    Dr Helen Milroy is a descendant of the Palyku people of the Pilbara region of Western Australia. She was born and educated in Perth and has a passionate interest in health and wellbeing, especially for children. She is currently a professor at the University of Western Australia, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist, and Commissioner with the National Mental Health Commission. Her books have been shortlisted for the Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards (2019, 2020), the Readings Children’s Book Prize (2020) and the Speech Pathology Australia Book of the Year (2020). And her book, Backyard Birds, won the Whitley Award for the Young Children’s Reader Category (2021).



    Backyard Bugs, Backyard Birds and Wombat, Mudlark and Other Stories are available in all good bookstores and online. Her new book, Backyard Beasties, is coming soon in 2022.



    About the guest



    James Foley is an ambassador for Books In Homes and Room To Read. James makes picture books, middle grade novels and comics for kids. He’s the author/illustrator of the S.Tinker Inc. graphic novel series for middle primary: Brobot (2016), Dungzilla (2017), Gastronauts (2018) and Chickensaurus (2020). The series stars Sally Tinker, the world’s foremost inventor under the age of twelve, and Joe Tinker, full-time baby. James also illustrated the Toffle Towers series written by Tim Harris; the cult-favourite and CBCAChildren’s Book Council of Australia-shortlisted My Dead Bunny (2015); and its follow-up, There’s Something Weird About Lena (2020). James contributed to Total Quack Up (2018) and Funny Bones (2019), both anthologies of funny stories, with proceeds going to charity. His earlier books, In The Lion (2012), The Last Viking (2011) and The Last Viking Returns (2014), have all scored several honours, including children’s choice awards, shortlistings in the Children’s Book Council of Australia Book of the Year awards, and selection to the International Youth Library’s White Raven list.



    His next book, Stellarphant, is out now.



    Books, authors and organisations mentioned



    Aesop’s Fables



    Animalia

    • 36 min
    Helen Milroy presents: on the latest podcast, the insightful and joyful Jessica Walton talks about why every child needs a diverse bookshelf

    Helen Milroy presents: on the latest podcast, the insightful and joyful Jessica Walton talks about why every child needs a diverse bookshelf

    Jessica Walton, co-creator of the new graphic novel Stars in Their Eyes, says when young people become disabled or are born with a disability, they're often in a family of non-disabled people and don't always get connected to the disabled community soon enough. She’s passionate about all young people getting to see themselves represented in literature, film and television and believes that adults have a responsibility to make sure children are exposed to disability in the fictional world before they interact with them in the real world.
    Topics discussed Being kind to your writing self Diversifying your bookshelf Encouraging kids to make a career out of writingSelf-care and writing time when you have a disability Representation in literature Using a Kickstarter campaign to get your book published Working with an illustrator
    For the full show notes go to www.fremantlepress.com.au.
    Original music ‘Steel Cap Serenade’ by Aidan D’Adhemar, © 2021
    Sound engineering Aidan D’Adhemar, Fremantle PA Hire 
    Produced by Claire Miller, Fremantle Press Marketing and Communications Manager
    This podcast was produced in Walyalup in Whadjuk Boodja, on the lands of the Noongar people.

    • 29 min
    Helen Milroy presents: Gladys Milroy shows you’re never too old to write your story

    Helen Milroy presents: Gladys Milroy shows you’re never too old to write your story

    Born in 1927, Gladys Milroy was taken to the Parkerville Orphanage at two years old and spent the next 14 years separated from her mother, Daisy. Gladys say, ‘I think the thing is about growing up in an orphanage is that you live in a story all the time because that’s the way you survive.’
    Now in her tenth decade, Gladys says she getting more stories than ever before. ‘A lot of stories I get at night when I’m dreaming … it’s all in colour and I’m part of it … that’s what I love about it. It’s like I’m in this beautiful story that I’m writing.’
    Of writing books for children she says, ‘I think people have to be very honest and truthful with their kids. Don’t dress it up and fancy it up. They need to see the truth … We’re all part of each other, we all belong to each other and we’re all part of nature.’
    Topics discussed Aboriginal storytelling Connecting to nature through stories Dreaming and writing in full colour Illustrating an entire story in one image Where do stories come from?
    For the full show notes go to www.fremantlepress.com.au.
    Original music ‘Steel Cap Serenade’ by Aidan D’Adhemar, © 2021
    Sound engineering Aidan D’Adhemar, Fremantle PA Hire 
    Produced by Claire Miller, Fremantle Press Marketing and Communications Manager
    This podcast was produced in Walyalup in Whadjuk Boodja, on the lands of the Noongar people.

    • 18 min
    The Fremantle Press podcast: Leanne Hall of Readings says networking can be a beautiful, natural and organic thing

    The Fremantle Press podcast: Leanne Hall of Readings says networking can be a beautiful, natural and organic thing

    Leanne Hall joins us on the podcast! We are so pleased to have a bookseller chat to us. Leanne is an author of young adult and children's fiction and works as an online children’s and YA specialist at the independent bookshop Readings. Once you’ve listened to this podcast you’ll feel like you know your local bookseller, and the business of selling books, a lot better.   
    Though she acknowledges the highly competitive nature of our industry, Leanne’s interview is brimming with tips and encouragement. Even her idea of networking makes it sound quite nice really. She says, ‘I think a lot of people cringe with the idea of … networking in this really sort of callous, calculating way, but it doesn’t have to be like that, it can be a beautiful, natural and organic thing. Most writers are writing because they love books. They genuinely love reading and they love books … Act accordingly; demonstrate your passion and it will come back to you for sure.’
    Topics discussed: Competition for shelf space Creating a relationship with your local bookseller How bookstores choose books Learning from your genre specialist before you’re published Myth-busting the art of bookselling Unlocking your writers block with Sasha Wasley When NOT to approach your bookseller
    The How to Be an Author editions of the Fremantle Press podcast are an informal series of chats between publishing industry professionals. Co-hosted by Marketing and Communications Manager Claire Miller and Publisher Georgia Richter, it features regular guest appearances by editor Armelle Davies, as the Comma Chameleon, special publishing industry guests and top tips from contributors to the book How to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia.
    Original music Title Music and Comma Chameleon Theme by Mo Wilson (copyright 2021)
    Sound engineering Aidan D’Adhemar, Fremantle PA Hire
    Produced by Tiffany Ko, Claire Miller and Chloe Walton, Fremantle Press Marketing and Communications
    This podcast was produced in Walyalup in Whadjuk Boodja, on the lands of the Noongar people.

    • 30 min
    Helen Milroy presents: Katie Stewart says encouraging kids to ask and answer their own questions is one of the keys to creativity

    Helen Milroy presents: Katie Stewart says encouraging kids to ask and answer their own questions is one of the keys to creativity

    Katie Stewart said she turned to art because she couldn’t keep up with her two older sisters who were incredibly bright. Drawing was her way to do something that distinguished her from them.
    With pressure on her to go to university and make the most of the opportunities her mother never had, Katie first did a degree in archaeology then had many career twists and tangents. Katie was well into her fifth decade before she finally turned back to her abiding passion for art. In this podcast she discusses her work and her journey with Helen Milroy.
    Topics discussedArtist studio or hoarder’s paradise?Critical thinking for kidsDigital illustrationFollowing your passionWhere do ideas come from?
    For the full show notes go to https://www.fremantlepress.com.au/c/news
    Original music ‘Steel Cap Serenade’ by Aidan D’Adhemar, © 2021
    Sound engineering Aidan D’Adhemar, Fremantle PA Hire
    Produced by Claire Miller, Fremantle Press Marketing and Communications Manager

    • 11 min

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