34 episodes

History better than fiction. The History Cache podcast excavates through the most primordial interiors of the human experience with in-depth research, an intelligent narrative, and a fairly inexcusable level of nerdery. A history podcast for the most curious of minds.

The History Cache Podcast historycachepodcast

    • History
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

History better than fiction. The History Cache podcast excavates through the most primordial interiors of the human experience with in-depth research, an intelligent narrative, and a fairly inexcusable level of nerdery. A history podcast for the most curious of minds.

    Once Dead, Twice Buried Part 2: A Short History on Being Buried Alive

    Once Dead, Twice Buried Part 2: A Short History on Being Buried Alive

    The finale of our miniseries comes to a close as we cover several real historical instances of people actually being buried along with a few who had some uncomfortable close calls. We hear about the incredible case of Mathew Wall and find out why on October 2nd for the last 450 years or so, the town of Braughing in Hertfordshire has celebrated “Old Man’s Day.” We learn about the curious cases of Nicephorous Glycas from Lesbos and Anne Green from Oxfordshire who nearly made it to their own funerals and/or dissections. We learn about Alice Blunden and why you should always check twice, maybe even three times, before you bury someone. After that we hear about the unfortunate case of Anna Hockwalt in 19th century Dayton, Ohio, before making a pit stop in France to visit Angelo Hays and find out just what a toilet was doing in a coffin in the 1970’s.

    • 35 min
    Once Dead, Twice Buried Part 1: A History of Death Tests and Safety Coffins

    Once Dead, Twice Buried Part 1: A History of Death Tests and Safety Coffins

    It’s Halloween season, and that means it’s time for some spooky history. And what is spookier than being buried alive? Nothing really, and that’s where this two-part miniseries is headed. Today in Part 1 we cover taphophobia-the fear of being buried alive-and examine some of the ways we’ve dealt with this fear throughout history. Safety coffins, devices built to save the prematurely buried, and the death tests we used to determine if a person was really, completely dead, are showcased. Edgar Allen Poe, Houdini, and some ill-fated escape artists even make an appearance. If you love the macabre, you don’t want to miss this one. Come get your spook on.  

    • 21 min
    A Strange Experiment: Dr. William Beaumont and the 'Guinea Pig' of Mackinac Island.

    A Strange Experiment: Dr. William Beaumont and the 'Guinea Pig' of Mackinac Island.

    In 1822 on Mackinac Island, French Canadian Fur Trader Alexis St Martin was shot in the side at a distance of less than one meter. The experiments following his miraculous survival just may be the weirdest piece of history ever seen in the Straits of Mackinac.The bullet wound left a hole in St Martin’s side giving Dr. William Beaumont the first ever access to a living human stomach. The doctor would tie pieces of food to a silk string and dangle them down into St Martin’s stomach in order to better understand the process of digestion. But the experiments didn’t stop there. Nearly 250 experiments were performed over nearly a decade.Dr. Beaumont’s book on the experiments first published in 1833 entitled “Experiments and Observations on the Gastric Juice and the Physiology of Digestion” paved the way for our understanding of the human gastric system and earned Beaumont the title of Father of Gastric Physiology.St Martin lived his entire life with a bullet hole his side, which became a gastric fistula, or “passageway” that never closed. He was buried in a secret location eight feet below ground with two feet of rocks on his coffin to deter grave robbers from stealing his corpse or his stomach, which was highly sought after when he died.Come hear the true story of Dr. William Beaumont and Alexis St Martin in this extra strange episode of the History Cache Podcast.

    • 28 min
    Leadbelly Part 5: Death of a Legend

    Leadbelly Part 5: Death of a Legend

    The finale is here! We finish the Leadbelly series by uncovering the last few years of his life. We watch his meteoric rise, examine the ups and downs of his relationship with John and Alan Lomax, see him embark on his own, and hear about how he influenced not only the popular folk musicians of the 1940s, but all of popular music since.We learn about his death, his legacy, and say goodbye to the series highlighting one of the most influential, and often overlooked, musicians of all time.

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Leadbelly Part 4: Angola, John Lomax, and a Song for the Governor

    Leadbelly Part 4: Angola, John Lomax, and a Song for the Governor

    We continue our way through the life of Leadbelly in Part 4. In this episode we see Leadbelly make a plea for a pardon with his music, and watch as he tries adjusting to life outside of prison. As hard as he tries starting life anew, he finds himself once again behind bars, this time in Angola, known as the Alcatraz of the South, one of the bloodiest prisons in US history. We finally meet John Lomax and his son Allen who would become key figures in Leadbelly’s life as they traveled the South searching for American folk music to preserve for the Library of Congress. We clear up some Leadbelly myth with primary sources, learn a bit about the earliest attempts at musical preservation through recording, and even get to hear a 130-year-old Passamaquoddy war song recorded by anthropologist Jesse Walker Fewkes.The adventure continues.

    • 50 min
    Leadbelly Part 3: Music and Murder

    Leadbelly Part 3: Music and Murder

    Music and murder collide in the third installment of the series highlighting the life of one of America’s greatest musical legends: Leadbelly. Ledbetter was already a fugitive when he murdered Will Stafford on a dirt road in Texas. No longer able to run from the law, Huddie faced difficult times in the brutal early 20th century prison system where he wrote some of his most profound music. But Leadbelly wouldn’t go down without a fight (and at least two more prison breaks). In this episode, we explore the next chapter of his life, as well as learn the dark history of convict leasing and why the remains of 95 inmates, known as the “Sugarland 95,” lie buried just below the surface of a small, Texas town.

    • 57 min

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History!

As a person who adores history this podcast definitely delivers. Sit back and enjoy some awesome historical events!!!

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