26 episodes

Welcome to This is Money's podcast, The Investing Show, where we invite fund managers to explain how they invest and tell us about the companies and parts of the world that they think will deliver the best returns - to help you learn from their successes.

The Investing Show podcast The Investing Show

    • Investing
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Welcome to This is Money's podcast, The Investing Show, where we invite fund managers to explain how they invest and tell us about the companies and parts of the world that they think will deliver the best returns - to help you learn from their successes.

    How to find shares with dividends that can grow

    How to find shares with dividends that can grow

    Studies show that dividends paid out and reinvested are the key to long-term stock market total returns, but should you invest for income, growth or a mix of the two?
    ‘It’s not just about high yield, it’s about owning companies with dividends that we think can steadily grow into the future’, says Troy Income & Growth co-manager Hugo Ure.
    This style of investing can deliver both a decent and solid income and companies that can see their share price rise over time, he argues.
    Troy Income and Growth predominantly invests in UK companies and currently yields 3.2 per cent – below the market’s 4 per cent – but has grown its annual payout by 5 per cent on average over the past five years.
    On this episode of the Investing Show, Hugo discusses how he looks for the best income and growth opportunities, how to avoid value traps when weighing up high yield stocks and some of the companies he thinks can produce robust and growing dividends in years to come.
    Among the trust’s top ten holdings are some familiar big gun names, including Unilever, Lloyds and Shell, but Hugo also talks us through some of the lesser-known names, such as Sabre Insurance, which insurers non-standard drivers and operates in a niche in which it can continue to grow.

    • 19 min
    How biotech investors can profit from an ageing population and the future of medicine

    How biotech investors can profit from an ageing population and the future of medicine

    The Blue Whale fund has delivered sparkling performance since its launch just over two years ago, but its manager is also looking to protect his investors if a downturn arrives.
    Manager Stephen Yiu looks for the 30 best companies in the world and says that were we to go into recession tomorrow, he would be comfortable that they could still deliver returns.
    With the fund becoming an investor's darling thanks to its strong returns, how it would fare in a downturn or if the US stock market it is heavily invested in tumbles, should be a key question for investors. 
    So what has been the secret to Blue Whale’s start-up success and where is the fund investing now? 
    On this episode of the Investing Show, its manager Stephen Yiu joins Simon Lambert and Richard Hunter to discuss its performance.
    He talks about the companies that he is backing, why he believes the US still holds great opportunities and how he seeks to protect his investors from shares that face risks – and overvaluation.

    • 19 min
    How biotech investors can profit from an ageing population and the future of medicine

    How biotech investors can profit from an ageing population and the future of medicine

    The wealthy western world’s population is ageing and medicine is changing fast.
    Biotechnology lies at the intersection of this growing need for healthcare and treatments that are tailored to patients, such as immunotherapy, rather than taking a traditional one size fits all approach.
    Investors’ excitement for this brave new world saw many biotech fund and trusts deliver startling performance from 2012 to 2016 before the sector then suffered a fall, as the last US election brought worries to the fore.
    Things have begun to look up again for biotech over the past year and we are joined on this Investing Show by Ailsa Craig, of International Biotechnology Trust, to find out more about this and the sector.

    • 15 min
    Why we invest in Amazon, Tesla... and Ferrari': Scottish Mortgage's Tom Slater on hunting for the best growth shares

    Why we invest in Amazon, Tesla... and Ferrari': Scottish Mortgage's Tom Slater on hunting for the best growth shares

    Scottish Mortgage has delivered big returns to investors by backing some of technology and the modern consumer world's biggest names.
    But are the best days already past of the star firms, such as Amazon, Google and Tesla, that have helped deliver a 474 per cent return over ten years?
    And is China's burgeoning technology scene good enough to warrant major backing?
    On this episode of the Investing Show, Scottish Mortgage's co-manager Tom Slater, joins us to explain how the trust invests and why he believes 'the world's most exciting, interesting growth companies' have many more years of good times ahead.

    • 19 min
    Are 'cheap' bank shares an opportunity to profit or a value trap?

    Are 'cheap' bank shares an opportunity to profit or a value trap?

    Lloyds Banking Group shares leapt almost 13 per cent last week on hopes of a Brexit deal.
    But that was a rare bit of sunshine in an overwhelmingly gloomy year for the millions of UK investors who hold Lloyds shares. 
    Despite the fact that Lloyds shares pack a dividend yield of 6.2 per cent, trade on a lowly forward price-to-earnings ratio of 7, and can be bought for less than they are worth, with a price-to-book value of 0.8, they are deeply unloved.
    Even after today's bounce, Lloyds shares (https://investing.thisismoney.co.uk/quote/LLOY) are down about 20 per cent on where they stood before the Brexit vote and a third below there 2015 peak. 
    While Lloyds is considered the most UK economy-focused of Britain's big banks, its rival big names are out of favour too, with HSBC, Barclays and RBS all firmly off investors' wish lists.
    Britain's banks should be doing well at this point in the economic cycle, but are instead suffering from a double hangover, induced first by the financial crisis and then Brexit. 
    So, is this a chance to profit, or a value trap for investors? Simon Lambert, of This is Money, and Richard Hunter, of Interactive Investor, take a look.

    • 16 min
    How to invest in the new era of falling interest rates

    How to invest in the new era of falling interest rates

    Interest rates are being cut again around the world but investors would be foolish to think that the trade that has made them money in the past five to ten years will continue unchecked.
    That is the warning of Tom Becket, chief investment officer at Psigma Investment Management, who says investors should beware the overcrowded strategy of holding low yielding government bonds and high growth US shares.
    The US Federal Reserve has cut interest rates and the European Central Bank has followed and restarted quantitative easing, meanwhile expectations in the UK are now for the base rate to fall rather than rise.
    Yet the new world of falling rates will not be the same as the post-financial crisis one, where a wave of cheap money provided a rising tide that lifted all boats, argues Becket.
    Instead, he says that investors may consider looking to the world’s unloved assets, including Japanese shares, certain emerging markets, Europe’s better companies and UK companies beaten up by the Brexit storms.
    He joins Simon Lambert and Richard Hunter on the latest Investing Show to explain why he thinks the mood music has changed for the cheerleaders of globalisation and how investors can prepare themselves to protect their wealth and profit in the years ahead.

    • 17 min

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