62 episodes

The Little Red Podcast: interviews and chat celebrating China beyond the Beijing beltway. Hosted by Graeme Smith, China studies academic at the Australian National University's Department of Pacific Affairs and Louisa Lim, former China correspondent for the BBC and NPR, now with the Centre for Advancing Journalism at Melbourne University. We are the 2018 winners of podcast of the year in the News & Current Affairs category of the Australian Podcast Awards. Follow us @limlouisa and @GraemeKSmith, and find show notes at www.facebook.com/LittleRedPodcast/

The Little Red Podcast Graeme Smith and Louisa Lim

    • News
    • 4.7 • 69 Ratings

The Little Red Podcast: interviews and chat celebrating China beyond the Beijing beltway. Hosted by Graeme Smith, China studies academic at the Australian National University's Department of Pacific Affairs and Louisa Lim, former China correspondent for the BBC and NPR, now with the Centre for Advancing Journalism at Melbourne University. We are the 2018 winners of podcast of the year in the News & Current Affairs category of the Australian Podcast Awards. Follow us @limlouisa and @GraemeKSmith, and find show notes at www.facebook.com/LittleRedPodcast/

    Xi Dada and Daddy: Power, the Party and the President

    Xi Dada and Daddy: Power, the Party and the President

    A quick glance at the headlines suggest that only one man seems to count in today’s China – the Chairman of Everything, as he’s been dubbed - Communist party leader President Xi Jinping. He’s helmed China’s reemergence as a world power through his aggressive foreign policy, while consolidating power at home. In this episode, we delve into his own princeling past, looking at his relationship with his father, former Vice Premier Xi Zhongxun, and how his family background has influenced his political philosophy. To discuss how Xi’s revolutionary past is shaping China’s future, we’re joined by the Chinawatchers' Chinawatchers, Frederick Teiwes from the University of Sydney and Joseph Torigian from American University in Washington DC.

    Image: Xi Jinping, Xi Yuanping and Xi Zhongxun in 1958, Wikipedia Commons

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 51 min
    See the difference? CGTN in the dock

    See the difference? CGTN in the dock

    Last year China's international state-run broadcaster, CGTN, spent millions opening a state-of-the-art London headquarters. Just one year on, it may already be scrambling for an exit strategy. CGTN may even lose its licence in the United Kingdom after the British regulator found it breached the broadcasting code. This episode we interview two people who have brought complaints against CGTN after it broadcast their forced confessions: Peter Dahlin from Safeguard Defenders and private investigator Peter Humphrey. Along with Sarah Cook of Freedom House, they join Louisa and Graeme to discuss whether China's global media ambitions are being stopped in their tracks.

    Image: Peter Humphrey's TV appearance, c/- Alexey Garmash, Safeguard Defenders

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 51 min
    The New Compradors? Hong Kong's Taipans Face a New Era

    The New Compradors? Hong Kong's Taipans Face a New Era

    Even before they had seen its contents, Hong Kong's family-run firms - including two non-Chinese business empires that have shaped Hong Kong - were lining up to pledge support to the New National Security legislation.  Even in 2020, Hong Kong remains an oligopoly with a handful of wealthy conglomerates controlling vast swathes of Hong Kong's economy.  But these family-run firms no longer have the luxury of remaining silent about Chinese politics.   To look at two of these commercial dynasties and their role in creating Hong Kong as Asia's global city,  Louisa and Graeme are joined by Robert Bickers who has written China Bound: A History of John Swire & Sons and Its World, and Jonathan Kaufman, former Wall Street Journal correspondent who examines the Sassoons and the Kadoories in the Last Kings of Shanghai: the Rival Jewish Dynasties that Helped Create Modern China.  

    Photo credit: Wikiswire.com, B&S Shanghai Staff 1883. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3.0 License.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 35 min
    Trump's F*** China Moment: An Attitude, Not a Strategy

    Trump's F*** China Moment: An Attitude, Not a Strategy

    China-US ties are in a tailspin, spiralling ever deeper into an abyss. Just one short month has seen US sanctions on senior Chinese officials for atrocities against the Uyghurs, Hong Kong’s special status for trade and diplomacy revoked, and consulates closed in Houston and Chengdu respectively. There's even been talk of a travel ban on China's 92m Communist party members and their families. Is armed conflict really a possibility, and if so when? Louisa and Graeme are joined by Gady Epstein and Stanford University’s Oriana Skyler Mastro to discuss the strategy behind the belligerence and the timeline for war.

    Photo credit: Flickr. USS San Antonio alongside USS Carter Hall. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Corbin J. Shea/Released) 130321-N-SB587-349

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 45 min
    Hong Kong No More: The National Security Law and the Dual State

    Hong Kong No More: The National Security Law and the Dual State

    On June 30, Hong Kong will be subject to a new National Security Law. No one, not even Hong Kong’s Chief Executive, knows what will be in the bill, but details are slowly coming into focus. For critics, the legislation will create a ‘dual state’ that will undermine Hong Kong’s legal system and allow Beijing to target its opponents at will. For proponents, the bill will only affect a handful of people, and bring stability after a year of unrest. To ask whether the law spells the end of Hong Kong’s autonomy, Louisa and Graeme are joined by NYU legal expert Alvin Cheung, Lingnan University’s Ho Lok-sang and digital activist Glacier Kwong.

    Photo credit: Jonathan van Smit, Hong Kong Protests 2019, Flickr

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 51 min
    Hong Kong: Anything We Say Could Be A Crime

    Hong Kong: Anything We Say Could Be A Crime

    For the first time since 1989 Hong Kongers are banned from holding their annual June Fourth vigil in Victoria Park. Despite this provocation, Hong Kong establishment figures—from vice chancellors to movie stars to religious figures—have been lining up to pledge their loyalty to China and their support for the proposed National Security Law that will be enacted in Beijing, bypassing the local legislature. Only one newspaper in Hong Kong opposes it: the popular Apple Daily. Today we speak to its chairman and founder, Jimmy Lai-Chee-ying to discuss the impact of that decision.  Lai has already been called a traitor and accused of ‘subversion’ by China’s Global Times newspaper, even though this crime is not yet on the statute books in Hong Kong.  

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
69 Ratings

69 Ratings

Liam Aust ,

Thank you!

Amazing podcast. In-depth and meaningful discussion of the CCP with interesting guests.
Thank you for the effort! It is so important.

Alex in Canberra ,

One of the best

One of the best podcasts for explaining China, it’s politics and how it’s history and culture have led us to where we are now.

Peter C Parsons ,

The Last Secret, available where?

Great podcast. Always informative.
Where can we purchase The Last Secret? (Chinese or English is ok).
I can’t find it on Amazon.

Top Podcasts In News

Listeners Also Subscribed To