182 episodes

Artist Rebecca Crowell shares experiences and thoughts from three decades of painting, teaching and traveling, as well as her conversations with other artists. She is joined by her co-host, producer, and son, Ross Ticknor, who brings an entrepreneurial Millennial perspective. The conversations are broad and eclectic, focused on ideas, information and anecdotes that other artists may find helpful in their work and careers. A new episode is uploaded every weekend!

The Messy Studio with Rebecca Crowell Rebecca Crowell

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 7 Ratings

Artist Rebecca Crowell shares experiences and thoughts from three decades of painting, teaching and traveling, as well as her conversations with other artists. She is joined by her co-host, producer, and son, Ross Ticknor, who brings an entrepreneurial Millennial perspective. The conversations are broad and eclectic, focused on ideas, information and anecdotes that other artists may find helpful in their work and careers. A new episode is uploaded every weekend!

    Dealing with Disrespect

    Dealing with Disrespect

    Anyone who cares about the work they perform wants to have that work appreciated and respected. And while certain professions and high-level positions can elicit that respect almost automatically, people in many other fields have to build that regard from others over time. They need to constantly reinforce respect for what they do-- and most importantly, feel it within themselves in order to create it. Those in creative fields may have special challenges in building respect in a society that tends to look at what they do as unimportant, a hobby or sideline, or something they do simply to please themselves. Or their work may be regarded for its commercial or decorative value only. Today we’ll take a look at the ways artists and other creative people struggle to establish respect in the circles in which they move.


    Unfortunately, stereotypes about artists are often not favorable. We may be thought of as self-indulgent, irresponsible, arrogant, and perhaps not fully contributing members of society. So, situations in which artists are disrespected, not taken seriously, or valued for their contributions are common. Self-respect is key to identifying and –ideally--reacting constructively to such situations.


    Dealing with situations that involve disrespect can be difficult, especially for personality types that prefer to avoid conflict and let things slide. Lack of experience can also enter in, as disrespectful situations can develop because you are not sure what is expected or acceptable. For example, the first time you are in a gallery show or the first time you are asked to teach a workshop you may be asked to do things that are out of line with standard practice. But because for you it is unknown territory, you may accept them as the way things are done.


    Most of us, no matter our level of experience or ability to handle conflict, have boundaries that tell us when to object or walk away. It’s important to become aware of when those boundaries are challenged and rely on our inner sense of self-respect to respond. Be alert for manipulation and unreasonable expectations from others that concern your art practice, and practice stating your needs and limits. You can certainly decide to live with some situations that are less than perfect, but that choice should include clear benefits for yourself that you judge to balance the equation.


    It’s a difficult reality that we all run into disrespectful situations, and our personalities have everything to do with how we handle them. For many of us, letting things slide works for a while. But a situation that creates an ongoing sense of disrespect needs to be addressed. OPur work and self-respect are top priorities.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating, and special thanks to Mary J Kelly for her donation! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    Rebecca and her partner at Cold Wax Academy, Jerry McLaughlin are wrapping up an exciting Spring Quarter and have announced their lineup of topics for Summer quarter which begins July 7. Their weekly live, interactive sessions will focus on Mark-making, Composition, and on Setting and Following Intentions to create strong, cohesive work.


    But you don't have to wait for the new quarter to join the Academy--All sessions are recorded and fully accessible in the Member Library, and you can watch and rewatch at your own pace. In addition, joining at any time gives you access to

    • 39 min
    Respecting Your Artist Self

    Respecting Your Artist Self

    Self-respect is one of the central ingredients for a healthy mindset yet can be one of the hardest to achieve. As artists, we may lose our grip on it when encountering the larger art world. Or lack of self-respect may interfere with our art practice itself, keeping us from dedicating time and resources to our work, or behaving in ways that undermine our success. Is your self-respect as an artist firmly in place or does it waver or fade in some situations? Today we’ll talk about ways to build and maintain your self-respect inside and outside the studio.


    In a recent podcast we talked about the passion that underlies so much of what we do as artists and as entrepreneurs, and how that keeps us going even when we have times when the rest of the world does not seem to care about what we do. Part of passion is the respect we feel intrinsically for what we do; in some basic way we know how important it is and honor that. We need strong self-respect in order to put ourselves out there, keep us engaged, help us overcome obstacles, and also to recognize situations in which we are not being respected.


    Many people struggle to respect their own creative passion as the result of life circumstances, such as not being supported in their interest as a young person, or the need to have a good income early in life. If you don't have a good base of self-respect as an artist, or lifelong engagement with your creative side, how can you build up this key ingredient in growing your work and art career?


    This means placing priority on your studio time, buying yourself quality supplies and equipment, finding a supportive art community, and engaging with high level instruction or mentorship. It also helps to acknowledge realistically where you are as an artist. In may seem counter-intuitive but being humble as a beginner enhances self-respect, and in fact it may be crucial for getting through the initial learning phases and avoiding feeling like an imposter. In the same vein, learning to limit your interactions about your work with people who don't take you seriously is important, as is avoiding comparison with others who are further along with their work.


    No matter when or under what circumstances you have started your creative practice, respecting its place in your life is crucial to growing into yourself as an artist. We are the gatekeepers who protect that practice and honor its importance, and if we don't do that, we can't expect anyone else to do so.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating, and special thanks to Mary J Kelly for her donation! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    Rebecca and her partner at Cold Wax Academy, Jerry McLaughlin are wrapping up an exciting Spring Quarter and have announced their lineup of topics for Summer quarter which begins July 7. Their weekly live, interactive sessions will focus on Mark-making, Composition, and on Setting and Following Intentions to create strong, cohesive work.


    But you don't have to wait for the new quarter to join the Academy--All sessions are recorded and fully accessible in the Member Library, and you can watch and rewatch at your own pace. In addition, joining at any time gives you access to all the perks of membership and the benefits of being part of a growing, knowledgable community of other artists.


    Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience:
    "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most

    • 35 min
    When to Settle

    When to Settle

    One of the challenges of your art practice is being able to evaluate your finished work in terms of what is excellent and what is just good or all right. Many of us want to be able to identify our best work and also to accept nothing less than this for ourselves. But do we have to push everything we do to this highest standard? Can we allow some things to be less than our best and move on? And are we really able to be objective in evaluating our own work anyway?


    This is not about giving up on something that is a learning experience and the struggles you are encountering are likely to lead you into new territory. Here we are talking about your overall output and recognizing that not everything you produce is at the same level. It’s also about acknowledging that some work has already arrived at the place where it has little more to reveal.


    You may feel dissatisfied with a piece because it feels repetitive, or you are somehow not connecting with it in a personal way. That feeling is something to accept when it happens occasionally, although it can be a red flag if it happens very often, signaling that it’s time for a change.


    But if by all objective standards you can call the work finished and very good, it’s fine to send it out into the world. It’s easy to become so perfectionistic that we deprive others of seeing work that they may respond to very positively. You can think of your own standards as a ladder—the top rung is the work that you objectively believe to be excellent and also love for your own reasons, and the next rung down is still very good if it checks all the boxes for objective self-critique and you may --or may not-- love it on a subjective level. Work on either rung should be considered worthy of being seen by other people.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating, and special thanks to Phyllis Bryce for her donation! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    Rebecca and her partner at Cold Wax Academy, Jerry McLaughlin are wrapping up an exciting Spring Quarter and have announced their lineup of topics for Summer quarter which begins July 7. Their weekly live, interactive sessions will focus on Mark-making, Composition, and on Setting and Following Intentions to create strong, cohesive work.


    But you don't have to wait for the new quarter to join the Academy--All sessions are recorded and fully accessible in the Member Library, and you can watch and rewatch at your own pace. In addition, joining at any time gives you access to all the perks of membership and the benefits of being part of a growing, knowledgable community of other artists.


    Here is what a member named Sandy has to say about her own experience:
    "Rebecca and Jerry have presented the most professional, authentic and structured approach to a creative activity I have ever come across. Their selfless sharing of all their knowledge and encouragement is a gift in my life unsurpassed."


    And just in --for a limited time, Jerry and Rebecca are offering a new membership level that provides access to their extensive video workshop only-- the cost is $249 for 6 weeks of streaming access, plenty of time to watch and rewatch all the in-depth content provided in this unique video.


    Have an art related product, service, or event you would like to advertise on the Messy Studio Podcast?
    Email Ross at rticknor.core@gmail.com for current mid-roll advertising rates.

    For more from The

    • 33 min
    Creative Frustration

    Creative Frustration

    It’s an all-too familiar situation in the studio, coping with a work of art that seems to fight against you at every step, making each day with it a struggle. It’s so easy to become obsessed with a piece like this, trying to persuade it to cooperate, just as you might with a stubborn person. It can feel like an exhausting contest of wills, made all the more frustrating by your awareness that you are actually fighting with yourself. Today we’re going to talk about those pieces that make you want to tear out your hair or throw them out the window -window. Because we all know that feeling, right?


    Although lots of times our work flows well, and our frustrations are fairly fleeting, other times we experience the opposite. Your work can anger and upset us and feel as though it has its own negative persona. The fact that it is actually your own creation can make it a metaphor for all the ways you think you fall short as an artist. This can lead to a downward spiral in which you beat yourself up for not being able to make the thing work. And from that state of mind, it is also harder to calm down and see your way forward.


    How can you break loose from the negative grip of frustrating work? If you can avoid getting wound up emotionally I the first place, trust that the work is challenging for a reason and that you have something to learn, that is certainly the healthiest attitude. It may help to know that experiencing a high level of frustration is very common among creative people and is actually necessary to growth.


    But if your frustration feels unbearable, there are a few simple strategies. One is to retreat, walk away, and give yourself some time and space to be able to come back with a fresh eye. If you can gain some distance, you may be able to go over your work with an objective attitude and see what isn’t working and why. The problem with this approach alone is that it can lead to endless small changes and tweaks, without much real progress. So, it may also be time to make a bold, major change in the work. The best move may be to wipe out the previous path you were on with the work and allow for a fresh start.


    No matter how you choose to deal it riding out the cycle of frustration and resolution is part of the creative cycle. If your work never presents strong challenges, you are probably stuck in a rut of easy answers and rote solutions. The next time you’re ready to stick a palette knife through your canvas, remember that all creative people experience these feelings and that they do eventually open the way to new ideas and growth.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    Thank you also to everyone who has written testimonials for Ross's website! Have you enjoyed the audio production quality and hearing Ross's voice? Submit a testimonial by email at rticknor.core@gmail.com or by submitting the contact form at www.messystudiopodcast.com!

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    What's new at Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry are busy preparing new presentations for their Spring Quarter weekly live, interactive sessions. The topics for Spring are Shape, Scale and Proportion, and Self-Coaching to improve your work habits and productivity.


    As always, there will be plenty of opportunities to interact with Rebecca, Jerry, and other members, along with critique sessions, feedback about your paintings, and of course a deep dive into the three selected

    • 30 min
    Sparking Creative Passion

    Sparking Creative Passion

    Passion is a vital ingredient to staying motivated and focused on our creative work. It helps us find our own direction and voice and keeps us going even under hard personal circumstances or times when the outside world is failing to provide validation. Passion is a source of creative energy that sustains and revitalizes us. But is creative passion something we just have as an innate part of our personality? Or can it be nurtured and developed if we lack it? Today we talk about creative passion, and how to nurture and honor its role in our lives as artists.


    How do you know if you have passion? It is something you feel deeply, because it is rooted in emotional intensity. It is a source of creative energy that provides consistent motivation, and a way into a flow state in your work. Passion also provides you with self-respect and confidence for ourselves as artists, and when we respect the role of art in our lives, we tend to demand that from others around us. Working from this kind of passion provides a loop of positive feedback for your work, which sustains you during times of struggle.


    However, many artists may worry about a lack of passion for their work. But like many things, passion is something that can be nurtured and developed rather than something you either have or you don’t. It starts with commitment, practice, and building confidence. It also involves recognizing any inner issues that are holding back your full engagement with your art practice. Your medium and approach needs to be a good fit, and you need to be as free as you can from other people's expectations and pressures to perform. Negative self-talk can also block passion that is actually there for you under the surface. Another consideration is to seek out support and encouragement for your passion and avoid people who may want to tamp down your enthusiasm.


    Passion can seem like something that you simply have, or you don’t, but even people that have it probably did not start out that way. Passion for your work can grow just like any other aspect of your character when given the right conditions and attention. If you do feel passion, never dismiss it, honor its role in your life and expect the same from the people around you.


    .

    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    Thank you also to everyone who has written testimonials for Ross's website! Have you enjoyed the audio production quality and hearing Ross's voice? Submit a testimonial by email at rticknor.core@gmail.com or by submitting the contact form at www.messystudiopodcast.com!

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    What's new at Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry are busy preparing new presentations for their Spring Quarter weekly live, interactive sessions. The topics for Spring are Shape, Scale and Proportion, and Self-Coaching to improve your work habits and productivity.


    As always, there will be plenty of opportunities to interact with Rebecca, Jerry, and other members, along with critique sessions, feedback about your paintings, and of course a deep dive into the three selected topics of the quarter. Cold Wax Academy has been receiving lots of rave reviews from its members; they know it is the best online learning for cold wax painting available and the only membership program dedicated to this medium. Find out more at www.coldwaxacademy.com

    Have an art related product, service, or event you would like to adverti

    • 35 min
    Searching for Stories

    Searching for Stories

    Since the beginning of time, artists have told stories with their work. Sometimes the messages are straightforward and other times open to interpretation. Stories can be told with recognizable imagery, with symbols, and even with purely abstract elements. At the heart of telling stories is our desire to communicate and the human love of narrative. Do you think of your work as telling stories? In today’s discussions, we hope to open your mind to the narrative aspects of your work and perhaps enable you to mine your stories for new ideas.


    Throughout art history, storytelling has been a primary function of art, using stories from religion, history, and the legends of various cultures. We also find many personal stories, relating to individual artist's experiences. Considering visual expression as stories that record your life, your feelings and thoughts may be a new way of thinking especially in abstraction. But what is a story in its essence? It's something that takes us away from ordinary thoughts and perceptions, shifts our viewpoint, and transports us in some way. This magic happens visually as well as verbally, and for the artist as well as the viewer.


    Although visual stories may not follow the conventions of plot development and narrative arc that we find in written or verbal stories, there are similarities, including the dynamic of conflict and resolution. As artists, we manipulate the visual elements on a journey that involves both contrast and harmony A useful term in thinking about this aspect of abstraction is "abstract narrative." Thinking about your own abstract work as a narrative may help you to have patience and trust as it unfolds, much as a novelist allows characters to develop and find a voice.


    We can say things visually that go beyond words, but being conscious of your sources of ideas, the stories you want to tell, can strengthen your work. Stories bring meaning to any kind of art but in abstraction this perspective can help you find a voice and personal direction, because we all have stories to tell.




    Thanks to everyone who has been sharing the show and donating, and especially to Jennifer Smith for her monthly donation! If you would like to donate to the Messy Studio Podcast donate here.

    Thank you also to everyone who has written testimonials for Ross's website! Have you enjoyed the audio production quality and hearing Ross's voice? Submit a testimonial by email at rticknor.core@gmail.com or by submitting the contact form at www.messystudiopodcast.com!

    When you buy art supplies at Blick remember to use our affiliate link to support the podcast! Bookmark this link and then you don't even have to think about it again. This is one of the best ways to support the show. It takes a few seconds and costs you nothing! The Blick website works exactly the same way, but we earn 10% every time you buy art supplies.


    www.messystudiopodcast.com/blick

    What's new at Cold Wax Academy? Rebecca and Jerry are busy preparing new presentations for their Spring Quarter weekly live, interactive sessions. The topics for Spring are Shape, Scale and Proportion, and Self-Coaching to improve your work habits and productivity.


    As always, there will be plenty of opportunities to interact with Rebecca, Jerry, and other members, along with critique sessions, feedback about your paintings, and of course a deep dive into the three selected topics of the quarter. Cold Wax Academy has been receiving lots of rave reviews from its members; they know it is the best online learning for cold wax painting available and the only membership program dedicated to this medium. Find out more at www.coldwaxacademy.com

    Have an art related product, service, or event you would like to advertise on the Messy Studio Podcast?
    Email Ross at rticknor.core@gmail.com for current mid-roll advertising rates.

    For more fro

    • 35 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

GeorgiaTsarouhas ,

The Messy Studio with Rebecca Crowell

The Messy Studio podcast is one of my favourite go-to podcasts—I listen to Rebecca and Ross almost every day. Each conversation is filled with just the right amount of detail, incredible insight, and inspiration. The episodes cover the whole spectrum from conceptual or philosophical to aspirational to practical and useful advice. I think I’ve listened to each episode multiple times and realise particular moments especially help to propel me and resonate with me in my art practice over great expanses of time, and as an artist this podcast is much appreciated. I’m so grateful. I leave each episode inspired. Strongly recommended to all artists. Thanks, Georgia Tsarouhas

artist in Oz ,

Episode 6...Balancing work,travels etc

Thank you ,Rebecca...your “MessyStudio” podcasts with Ross are most informative & interesting...especially having worked with you in New Zealand.I love working in two fields...painting & printmaking but agree it takes quite a bit of juggling!!!I like how your work is progressing/evolving with the introduction of SHAPE.Look forward to seeing more of these works,also the next podcast.Cheers,Rhonda💕🎨💕

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