84 episodes

The ANU National Security College brings you expert analysis, insights and opinion on the national security challenges facing Australia and the Indo-Pacific. Produced with the support of Policy Forum.

The National Security Podcast ANU National Security College

    • Government
    • 4.7 • 63 Ratings

The ANU National Security College brings you expert analysis, insights and opinion on the national security challenges facing Australia and the Indo-Pacific. Produced with the support of Policy Forum.

    Indo-Pacific Futures – Critical technology

    Indo-Pacific Futures – Critical technology

    In this episode of the National Security Podcast, the second instalment of our special three-part series looking at key trends influencing the future strategic landscape of the Indo-Pacific, we consider the technologies that have become critical to national security and how they’re going to shape the region over the coming decades.

    Technology has been part of human life since shale was shaped to cut animal hide. Things have come a long way since stone was the leading edge of innovation. In this episode of the National Security Podcast, we speak to a number of scientists, researchers, strategic thinkers and analysts to find out what technologies they are working on and the ones that they think could plausibly influence the future strategic landscape.

    Jennifer Jackett is a Sir Roland Wilson Scholar in the National Security College at The Australian National University.

    Professor Claudia Vickers is leads the Synthetic Biology Future Science Platform at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).

    Dr Amy Parker is Vice-President of Earth Observation Australia.

    Dr Sue Keay is Chief Executive Officer of the Queensland AI Hub and Chair of Robotics Australia.

    Dr Atsushi Sunami is the President of the Sasakawa Peace Foundation.

    Michael O’Hanlon is Director of Research for Foreign Policy and Co-Director of the Center for Security, Strategy, and Technology at the Brookings Institution.

    Elsa Kania is Adjunct Senior Fellow with the Technology and National Security Program at the Centre for a New American Security.

    Chris Farnham is the Senior Outreach and Policy Officer at the ANU National Security College.

    This mini-series forms part of the Indo-Pacific Futures Project underway at ANU National Security College. This project, which explores the future strategic landscape of the Indo-Pacific region, offers a range of analysis and ideas, all of which is available on the Futures Hub website. In the rest of this series, experts from across the national security community will interrogate the future of the Indo-Pacific strategic landscape, evaluate the influence of critical technology on the region, and examine the rise of geoeconomics as a feature of great power competition. Don't miss the first episode of the series.

    The Indo-Pacific Futures Project receives support from the Japanese Embassy in Australia. ANU National Security College is independent in its activities, research, and editorial judgment and does not take institutional positions on policy issues. Accordingly, the author is solely responsible for the views expressed in this publication, which should not be taken as reflecting the views of any government or organisation.

    We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook. The National Security Podcast and Policy Forum Pod are available on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher, and wherever you get your podcasts.
     
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    • 36 min
    Tim Watts MP on national identity and cyber literacy in Australia

    Tim Watts MP on national identity and cyber literacy in Australia

    In this episode of the National Security Podcast, Tim Watts, Shadow Assistant Minister for Cyber Security and Communications, joins Rory Medcalf for the latest instalment of our Security Summit series.

    With cyber-enabled threats on the rise, including ransomware attacks, cyber espionage, and disinformation campaigns, how can Australia increase its cyber resilience and literacy? In this episode of the National Security Podcast, we host federal Labor Member for Gellibrand and Shadow Assistant Minister for Cyber Security and Communications Tim Watts MP to discuss the benefits of a strong sense of national identity to sustaining social cohesion and resilience, Australia’s cyber security literacy, and the unique ways change can be achieved while working from opposition.

    Tim Watts MP is the Shadow Assistant Minister for Cyber Security and Communications and the Federal Labor Member of Parliament representing the seat of Gellibrand. 

    Professor Rory Medcalf is Head of the National Security College at The Australian National University. His professional background involves more than two decades of experience across diplomacy, intelligence analysis, think tanks, and journalism.

    We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook. The National Security Podcast and Policy Forum Pod are available on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher, and wherever you get your podcasts.
     
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    • 52 min
    Indo-Pacific Futures – The grey zone, hybrid war, and minilateralism

    Indo-Pacific Futures – The grey zone, hybrid war, and minilateralism

    In this episode of the National Security Podcast, we bring you the first of a special three-part series looking at key trends influencing the future strategic landscape of the Indo-Pacific. This episode unpacks two competing trends that are shaping the regional order: the rise of grey zone and hybrid threats, and the emergence of ‘minilateralism’.

    Grey zone and hybrid threats have been rising in prominence as tools used by authoritarian states as they attempt to reshape the regional order. But what are they, who are they being used against, and how they are likely to evolve in coming years? And with minilateralism emerging as a preferred format for states to meet the challenges of great power competition, how might diplomacy evolve to match the shifting security landscape of the coming decade? In this episode of the National Security Podcast, we ask how these trends intersect and whether minilateralism is an effective tool to deal with grey zone and hybrid threats.

    Professor Sascha Bachmann is a Professor in Law at Canberra Law School and co-convener of the National Security Hub at the University of Canberra. He is also a Research Fellow at the Security Institute for Governance and Leadership in Africa at Stellenbosch University.

    Elisabeth Braw is a Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute where she focuses on defense against emerging national security challenges, such as hybrid and grey zone threats.

    Professor Akiko Fukushima is a Senior Fellow at the Tokyo Foundation for Policy Research. She has previously held roles as Director of Policy Studies at the National Institute for Research Advancement and as Senior Fellow at the Japan Foundation.

    Dr Frank Hoffman is a Distinguished Research Fellow at the National Defense University's Center for Strategic Research.

    Professor Takashi Shiraishi is Chancellor of the Prefectural University of Kumamoto and Professor Emeritus at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.

    Abhijit Singh is a Senior Fellow at the Observer Research Foundation in New Delhi, where he heads the Maritime Policy Initiative.

    Dr Sarah Teo is a Research Fellow and Coordinator of the Regional Security Architecture Programme at the S Rajaratnam School of International Studies at Nanyang Technological University.

    Aarshi Tirkey is a Junior Fellow at Observer Research Foundation, working in its Strategic Studies Programme. Her research focuses on international law, especially its relevance and application to Indian foreign policy.

    Professor Jingdong Yuan is an Associate Professor at the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. He specialises in Asia-Pacific security, Chinese defence and foreign policy, and global and regional arms control and non-proliferation issues.

    Chris Farnham is the Senior Outreach and Policy Officer at the ANU National Security College.

    This mini-series forms part of the Indo-Pacific Futures Project underway at ANU National Security College. This project, which explores the future strategic landscape of the Indo-Pacific region, offers a range of analysis and ideas, all of which is available on the Futures Hub website. In the rest of this series, experts from across the national security community will interrogate the future of the Indo-Pacific strategic landscape, evaluate the influence of critical technology on the region, and examine the rise of geoeconomics as a feature of great power competition.

    The Indo-Pacific Futures Project receives support from the Japanese Embassy in Australia. ANU National Security College is independent in its activities, research, and editorial judgment and does not take institutional positions on policy issues. Accordingly, the author is solely responsible for the views expressed in this publication, which should not be taken as reflecting the views of any government or org

    • 57 min
    Avoiding a space race to the bottom: Australia as a ‘middle space power’

    Avoiding a space race to the bottom: Australia as a ‘middle space power’

    In this episode of the National Security Podcast, Mission Specialist at the ANU Institute for Space Dr Cassandra Steer, CEO of the Space Industry Association of Australia James Brown, and Visiting Fellow at ANU National Security College Katherine Mansted join Dayle Stanley to interrogate the opportunities and risks presented to Australia as a ‘middle space power’.


    Space is a critical strategic domain for Australia’s civilian and military interests but is increasingly congested, contested, and competitive. Major powers are engaged in a destabilising space arms race – China, Russia, and the United States have rejected the strategic restraint that kept space a stable political and military domain. As a ‘middle space power’, Australia has the capacity to encourage responsible behaviour in space. In this episode of the National Security Podcast, ANU National Security College brings you a panel discussion between Dr Cassandra Steer, James Brown, Katherine Mansted, and Dayle Stanley that interrogates the opportunities and risks presented to Australia as a middle space power.


    Dr Cassandra Steer FHEA is a Senior Lecturer at ANU College of Law and Mission Specialist at the ANU Institute for Space (InSpace) and the author of recent Policy Options Paper Australia as a Space Power: Combining Civil, Defence and Diplomatic Efforts.


    James Brown is the CEO of the Space Industry Association of Australia, Australia’s peak body for the space sector. He is currently a non-resident fellow at the United States Studies Centre, Chairman of Veteran Sports Australia, and a strategic adviser to the University of Technology Sydney.


    Katherine Mansted is a Senior Adviser at the National Security College and non-resident fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Previously, she was a commercial solicitor with King & Wood Mallesons, a ministerial adviser to the federal government, and served as an Associate in the High Court of Australia.


    Dayle Stanley is Director, Strategy and Engagement at the National Security College Futures Hub at The Australian National University.


    We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook. The National Security Podcast and Policy Forum Pod are available on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher, and wherever you get your podcasts.
     
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    • 1 hr 2 min
    Audiopaper | New Indo-Pacific partnership: building Australia-Bangladesh security ties

    Audiopaper | New Indo-Pacific partnership: building Australia-Bangladesh security ties

    This episode of the National Security Podcast brings you an audiopaper from the Policy Options Paper series, the flagship publication of ANU National Security College. New Indo-Pacific partnership: Building Australia-Bangladesh security ties is authored by David Brewster, Senior Research Fellow at ANU National Security College.

    As part of its Indo-Pacific strategy, Australia needs to broaden its engagement in South Asia. For at least a decade, Australia has rightly concentrated on its partnership with India, but it is now time to broaden that strategy to include other countries in that region. Bangladesh should be an important part of that new focus. With its thriving economy and a population of more than 160 million, it has the potential to become the next ‘Asian tiger’. In this Policy Options Paper, David Brewster argues the case for why Australia should develop its defence and security relationship with Bangladesh as part of broader political and economic engagement, and outlines how this could be achieved.

    Policy Options Papers offer short, evidence-based and forward-looking insights and recommendations for policymakers on topical national security issues facing Australia. Every paper in the series is informed by consultation, and reviewed by practitioner and academic experts.

    Dr David Brewster is a Senior Research Fellow at the ANU National Security College. His research focuses on security in India and the Indian Ocean region, and Indo-Pacific maritime affairs.
     
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    • 20 min
    The next ‘Asian tiger’: building Australia-Bangladesh security ties

    The next ‘Asian tiger’: building Australia-Bangladesh security ties

    In this episode of the National Security Podcast, ANU National Security College Senior Research Fellow Dr David Brewster and Ric Smith – former Australian Ambassador to China and Indonesia and Secretary of Defence – join Professor Rory Medcalf to explore what a deeper Australia-Bangladesh security relationship should look like.

    As part of its Indo-Pacific strategy, Australia needs to broaden its engagement in South Asia. For at least a decade, Australia has rightly concentrated on its partnership with India, but it is now time to broaden that strategy to include other countries in that region. Bangladesh should be an important part of that new focus. With its thriving economy and a population of more than 160 million, it has the potential to become the next ‘Asian tiger’. In this episode of the National Security Podcast, Dr David Brewster and former Australian Ambassador to China and Indonesia Ric Smith join Professor Rory Medcalf to discuss why Australia should develop its defence and security relationship with Bangladesh as part of broader political and economic engagement.

    David has authored the College’s latest Policy Options Paper, New Indo-Pacific Partnership: Building Australia-Bangladesh Security Ties, and Ric is the author of a compelling working paper published by the ANU National Security College in 2016, Forgotten Friends: Australia, India and the Independence of Bangladesh.

    Dr David Brewster is Senior Research Fellow at the ANU National Security College. His research focuses on security in India and the Indian Ocean region, and Indo-Pacific maritime affairs.

    Richard C Smith AO PSM served in Australia’s diplomatic missions in India, Israel, the Philippines and Hawaii. He became Deputy Secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in 1992 and then Deputy Secretary of the Department of Defence in 1994. He served as Ambassador to China from 1996-2000 and as Ambassador to Indonesia in 2001-2002, before being appointed as Secretary of the Department of Defence in 2002.

    Professor Rory Medcalf is Head of the National Security College at The Australian National University. His professional background involves more than two decades of experience across diplomacy, intelligence analysis, think tanks, and journalism.

    We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook. The National Security Podcast and Policy Forum Pod are available on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher, and wherever you get your podcasts.
     
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    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
63 Ratings

63 Ratings

Rovescia ,

Deepens & sharpens one’s understanding

The content is interesting and it’s important. Essential listening for citizens who care about our shared future.

LJones93 ,

NSC Provides an Excellent Platform

Through this podcast the NSC has built a platform for some important discussions regarding Australian national security issues. Well put together!

Castmeout83 ,

Excellent

Great podcast! Quality interviews and topics.

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