750 episodes

A podcast about how to build a career in filmmaking. No Film School shares the latest opportunities and trends for anyone working in film and TV. We break news on cameras, lighting, and apps. We interview leaders in screenwriting, directing, cinematography, editing, and producing. And we answer your questions! We are dedicated to sharing knowledge with filmmakers around the globe, “no film school” required.

The No Film School Podcast No Film School

    • TV & Film
    • 4.3 • 23 Ratings

A podcast about how to build a career in filmmaking. No Film School shares the latest opportunities and trends for anyone working in film and TV. We break news on cameras, lighting, and apps. We interview leaders in screenwriting, directing, cinematography, editing, and producing. And we answer your questions! We are dedicated to sharing knowledge with filmmakers around the globe, “no film school” required.

    The Pause in Pipeline Programs & What It Means for You

    The Pause in Pipeline Programs & What It Means for You

    Is it ethical to encourage people to pursue a career in film when there are such high levels of unemployment in the industry? The Art Directors Guild certainly doesn’t think so which has led the union to pause their annual training program this year.

    In today’s episode, No Film School’s Charles Haine, GG Hawkins, and Jason Hellerman discuss:

    The ADG announcement to suspend the Production Design Initiative program

    Being cautious when admitting students to film school

    Why we think the ADG made a reasonable decision 

    Why you should file for unemployment between jobs

    How LA and New York feel like smaller markets right now

    Seeing where you can fit into the system

    Accepting the opportunities that already exist

    The benefits of having multiple revenue streams as a filmmaker


    Memorable Quotes

    “Big production is back to work…but the volume isn’t there.” [13:08]

    “You need to be open to letting the industry tell you where it wants you to be for a while.” [15:25]

    “Knowing how to do a new thing is always beneficial.” [15:59]

    “If you can develop multiple revenue streams, it gives you power in negotiation.” [19:05]



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    • 29 min
    ‘Prom Dates’ Writer & Director on Reviving the Teen Sex Comedy

    ‘Prom Dates’ Writer & Director on Reviving the Teen Sex Comedy

    Prom Dates, written by D.J. Mausner and directed by Kim Nguyen, is a comedy that follows two best friends who are hell-bent on having the perfect senior prom, despite the fact they broke up with their dates only 24 hours before the big night. This raunchy comedy reminds us that while romantic love may be fleeting, true friendship can survive any adversity that comes its way.

    In today’s episode, No Film School’s GG Hawkins speaks with Kim Nguyen and D.J. Mausner to discuss: 

    Writing the script in just 8 days 

    How D.J. and Kim immediately clicked

    Celebrating the importance of friends in our lives

    Developing the dynamic between the two lead characters

    Harnessing the amazing energy from the cast

    Filming in an old high school in Syracuse

    How having a comedy background can improve your writing

    The joy of working with gifted talent

    A dramatic scene that required considerable emotional gear-shifting

    How D.J.’s writing experiment turned into a film



    Memorable Quotes

    “Directors are like tuning forks. You get so much energy all the time from everyone, whether or not you want it or welcome it. You distill all that energy and harness it.” [15:46]

    “Sketch teaches you to get in late and get out early. Stand-up teaches you to have an ear for the audience. Improv allows you to fill in the blanks.” [20:35]

    “Stay true to yourself. Your point of view is your superpower.” [30:29]

    “The thing you’re excited about, write it. You never know what’s going to happen.” [30:44]



    Mentioned:
    Prom Dates


    Find No Film School everywhere:

    On the Web
    https://nofilmschool.com/

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    https://www.facebook.com/nofilmschool

    Twitter 
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    https://www.youtube.com/user/nofilmschool

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    https://www.instagram.com/nofilmschool

    Send us an email with questions or feedback: podcast@nofilmschool.com!
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    • 35 min
    Film Fests: The Merits and Scams; Plus, Film Communities Outside of the Bubbles with Amy Dotson

    Film Fests: The Merits and Scams; Plus, Film Communities Outside of the Bubbles with Amy Dotson

    What film festivals are worth submitting your projects to? Which festivals are legitimate and which ones are scams out for your money? Is it possible to find like-minded creatives to collaborate with, outside of places like L.A. and New York? 

    In today’s episode, No Film School’s Charles Haine, GG Hawkins, Jason Hellerman, and guest Amy Dotson discuss:

    Figuring out what you want to get out of a festival

    Reasons why small festivals are awesome

    Things to consider when vetting festivals 

    What Amy learned interning at Pee-wee’s Playhouse

    Telling your unique story in only one paragraph

    Why you need to constantly update your bio

    Moving from New York City to Portland

    Thinking about cinematic storytelling in new ways

    Collaborations between local artists and big household names

    How the Portland Art Museum honors multi-faceted creatives



    Memorable Quotes

    “What are you going to the festival for? Is it about Hollywood connections or about sharing your film with an audience?” [3:54]

    “Being in the mix and connecting with people at a human level is incredibly valuable. You will find those relationships pay off in the long run.” [12:42]

    “Everybody is different and that’s okay. It’s not a one-size-fits-all model anymore.” [23:34]

    “The goal is to meet other like-minded humans that can help push your career and push you as a human forward.” [29:37]

    “There are stories to be told that are less project-centered and more people-centered.” [46:24]



    Mentioned
    How To Spend $10,000 on Film Festival Submissions…

    Portland Art Museum

    PAM CUT Sustainability Labs

    PAM CUT Tomorrow Theater  


    Find No Film School everywhere:
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    https://nofilmschool.com/

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    https://www.facebook.com/nofilmschool

    Twitter 
    https://twitter.com/nofilmschool

    YouTube 
    https://www.youtube.com/user/nofilmschool

    Instagram
    https://www.instagram.com/nofilmschool

    Send us an email with questions or feedback: podcast@nofilmschool.com!
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    • 55 min
    How To Get a Short Film Into Sundance – and Turn It Into a Feature

    How To Get a Short Film Into Sundance – and Turn It Into a Feature

    “There’s never been a better time to make shorts or watch shorts,” says Mike Plante, the senior short film programmer at Sundance Film Festival. Mike, who has been at Sundance for over 20 years, shares his thoughts on the future of shorts and what his team looks for in the selection process.

    In today’s episode, No Film School’s Ryan Koo speaks with Mike Plante to discuss:

    Developing motion picture films at the drug store in the ‘90s

    Why shorts are a great medium to learn and experiment 

    Working at festivals and movie theaters

    Receiving over 12,000 short submissions in 2024

    Disadvantages of creating long shorts

    Differences in funding international shorts

    Seeing many different types of voices, stories, and styles

    Sundance shorts that later became features

    What makes you a filmmaker

    What Sundance looks for in a short



    Memorable Quotes

    “You’re always a filmmaker, but there will be months you’re not doing anything on your film.” [2:48]

    “You may watch a thousand shorts and nothing is good. Then you just start to lose your mind.” [10:45]

    “Your 30-minute short has to be better than three, 10-minute shorts.” [12:25]

    “The internet is good for shorts because you can put it up. It doesn’t mean anyone will watch it.” [31:31]



    Mentioned
    Submission Dates for Sundance


    Find No Film School everywhere:

    On the Web
    https://nofilmschool.com/

    Facebook 
    https://www.facebook.com/nofilmschool

    Twitter 
    https://twitter.com/nofilmschool

    YouTube 
    https://www.youtube.com/user/nofilmschool

    Instagram
    https://www.instagram.com/nofilmschool

    Send us an email with questions or feedback: podcast@nofilmschool.com!
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 45 min
    ‘Shōgun’ DPs on Lenses, Looks & How ‘The Descent’ Brought Them Together

    ‘Shōgun’ DPs on Lenses, Looks & How ‘The Descent’ Brought Them Together

    Long-time friends and colleagues, Christopher Ross and Sam McCurdy, are two of the cinematographers of FX’s mini-series, Shōgun. Filming this series was an incredible experience full of lessons in Japanese culture, lenses, and shooting with cranes.

    In today’s episode, No Film School’s GG Hawkins and special guest, cinematographer Ryan Thomas, speak with DPs Christopher Ross and Sam McCurdy to discuss: 

    How Chris and Sam met

    The type of friendships you hold onto in the industry 

    What it was like working with an international cast and crew on Shōgun


    The singular perspectives that ran throughout the larger storyline

    What it was like working with other DPs 

    The lenses they chose to use in this project 

    Letting the camera find special moments without much interference

    What an ASC masterclass is

    What gave the show its atmospheric texture

    Bringing truth and honesty to every episode

    Why making mistakes is so valuable




    Memorable Quotes

    “From the start of your career to the end of your career, you’re still on some form of learning curve.” [8:47]

    “Being true to what you’re shooting and being true to the script and the story is the still most important tool we bring to any job.” [50:33]

    “Be brave and stupid in equal measure. Get smarter every time you shoot.” [54:00]

    “Don’t necessarily listen to everyone else. Go and figure it out yourself.” [55:01]



    Mentioned:
    Shōgun

    Original 1980 Shogun series

    ASC Masterclass

    Connect with Ryan on IG



    Find No Film School everywhere:
    On the Web
    https://nofilmschool.com/

    Facebook 
    https://www.facebook.com/nofilmschool

    Twitter 
    https://twitter.com/nofilmschool

    YouTube 
    https://www.youtube.com/user/nofilmschool

    Instagram
    https://www.instagram.com/nofilmschool

    Send us an email with questions or feedback: podcast@nofilmschool.com!
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Writing the Unfilmable & Managing Your Career When SH*T Hits the Fan

    Writing the Unfilmable & Managing Your Career When SH*T Hits the Fan

    Writing a screenplay is like following a cookie recipe, it’s closer to magic than science. You don’t have to follow screenwriting “rules” to create an amazing story. There’s something else you don’t have to do in your career. When serious problems arise in your personal life, you don’t have to keep working at your typical pace. It’s okay to ask for help and decrease your output.

    In today’s episode, No Film School’s GG Hawkins and Jason Hellerman discuss:

    The number of “unfilmables” on the first page of the Challengers script

    Not getting hung up on the idiosyncrasies of screenwriting

    Hooking the reader in the first 10 pages with your confidence

    Asking for specific support when things are rough in your personal life

    Accidentally lighting a trash can on fire

    Taking time to process life’s challenges

    Using writing as a way to process loss and sadness

    Cancelling meetings and relying on email

    The benefits of a meditative practice 



    Memorable Quotes

    “I know what the audience wants to know right now. I know what they need to know, but don’t even know they want to know.” [11:28]

    “If your page one sucks, you’ve already lost them.” [12:26]

    “If you’re trying to make Hollywood hits with multi-million dollar budgets, page one has to be great!” [15:50]

    “You can still be creating, even when you’re in a depressed dark hole.” [28:45]



    Mentioned:
    Why Did the First Page of the 'Challengers' Screenplay Go Viral?


    Find No Film School everywhere:

    On the Web
    https://nofilmschool.com/

    Facebook 
    https://www.facebook.com/nofilmschool

    Twitter 
    https://twitter.com/nofilmschool

    YouTube 
    https://www.youtube.com/user/nofilmschool

    Instagram
    https://www.instagram.com/nofilmschool

    Send us an email with questions or feedback: podcast@nofilmschool.com!
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

Shaun francis ,

Very informative, also funny.

As above.

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