21 episodes

Stoicism is an ancient philosophy that originated in Greece over 2,000 years ago, and its teachings have left ripples throughout the world ever since. Simon Drew has been exploring the ideas of Stoicism on the Practical Stoic Podcast for over two years now, and it’s been an amazing journey. People are now discovering that Stoicism can not only help us to think better and make better decisions, but it can also lead to a meaningful life aimed at virtue. Now, join Simon as he revamps the podcast and tries to learn what it truly means to live a Stoic lifestyle. Listen to some of the most prominent Stoic voices in the world today as they extract the essence of Stoicism, and most importantly, attach your listening to action so that you can see just how powerful this philosophy can be.

The Practical Stoic Podcast with Simon J. E. Drew Simon Drew

    • Self-Improvement

Stoicism is an ancient philosophy that originated in Greece over 2,000 years ago, and its teachings have left ripples throughout the world ever since. Simon Drew has been exploring the ideas of Stoicism on the Practical Stoic Podcast for over two years now, and it’s been an amazing journey. People are now discovering that Stoicism can not only help us to think better and make better decisions, but it can also lead to a meaningful life aimed at virtue. Now, join Simon as he revamps the podcast and tries to learn what it truly means to live a Stoic lifestyle. Listen to some of the most prominent Stoic voices in the world today as they extract the essence of Stoicism, and most importantly, attach your listening to action so that you can see just how powerful this philosophy can be.

    John Sellars | Aligning with Your Nature, Finding Meaning & the Stoic Approach to Emotions

    John Sellars | Aligning with Your Nature, Finding Meaning & the Stoic Approach to Emotions

    About John Sellars: John Sellars is a Lecturer in Philosophy at Royal Holloway, University of London. He’s the author of a number of books on Stoicism, including The Art of Living (2003), Stoicism (2006), and Lessons in Stoicism (2019). He is also one of the founding members of Modern Stoicism, the organization that runs Stoic Week and Stoicon. 
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    • 56 min
    Scott Aikin | How to Argue, Preferred Indifferents and Stoic Ethics

    Scott Aikin | How to Argue, Preferred Indifferents and Stoic Ethics

    ABOUT OUR GUEST
    Scott F. Aikin is an American philosopher and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, where he also holds a joint appointment in Classics. He earned an M.A. in Philosophy from the University of Montana in 1999 and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Vanderbilt University in 2006. His principal areas of research are epistemology, argumentation theory, ancient philosophy, and pragmatism. And on top of all this he's also the co-author of the book "Why We Argue (How We Should) - A Guide to Political Disagreement." 
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    • 1 hr 7 min
    David Ropeik | Risk Perception During Challenging Times

    David Ropeik | Risk Perception During Challenging Times

    ABOUT OUR GUEST: David Ropeik is retired Harvard Instructor, author, and consultant on the psychology of risk perception, risk communication, and risk management. He was the principal faculty member of the professional education course The Risk Communication Challenge at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is author of How Risky Is It, Really? Why Our Fears Don’t Always Match The Facts, and principal co-author of RISK!!! A practical guide for deciding what’s really safe and what’s really dangerous in the world around you. Prior to teaching at the Harvard School of Public Health, he was a television reporter in Boston, twice winning the DuPont Columbia Award, often referred to as the Pulitzer Prize of broadcast journalism.
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    • 1 hr
    Choosing a Philosophical Life

    Choosing a Philosophical Life

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE: https://www.simonjedrew.com/choosing-a-philosophical-life/
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    CHOOSING A PHILOSOPHICAL LIFE
    Lately I’ve been trying to carefully observe myself and the world around me. I’ve been trying to see things for what they are, and not just for what they appear to be. And I say that I’m “trying” because one conclusion that I keep coming to is that no matter how hard I try, I will always simply be me, as I am, viewing this incredibly complex world through a lens that is limited in scope to say the least. It’s as if there’s an extravagant party happening in the mansion, and I’m trying to see what’s happening inside by looking through a keyhole on the kitchen door. I know there’s plenty of grand and exciting things happening, but for now all I can do is trust that with enough time I’ll be able to put a few pieces together. 
    I tend to have quite an obsessive personality, and I have definitely jumped around a lot in my life. From a young age my parents could see that if I was going to try something then I really wanted to try it. If I was riding horses then I wanted to be the cowboy! If I was playing music then I wanted to be on the stage becoming the best entertainer I could be! When I went to church I wanted to look the part, and when I wasn’t going to church I wanted to have all of the perfectly good reasons why I wasn’t. I’d like to say that this kind of “all in or nothing” attitude came down to a desire to give 100% to everything I was doing, but honestly in hindsight I can say that I wasn’t trying to go all in on anything. Rather, I think I was trying to give the appearance that I knew what life was all about when in reality I had absolutely no idea, and in trying to appear to be something, I now see that I was simply hiding the fact that I knew nothing. To me, the appearance of having the answers was more important than actually having any answers, and so I jumped around from one thing to another, always tasting but never being nourished. 
    Have you ever noticed that we all seem to think we have the answers? You only have to look as far back as your last family gathering to see that we all have a pretty unhealthy relationship with the words “I don’t know.” Just look around the world and see the division that is created simply because we can’t admit that we don’t have all the answers. Left vs right, religious vs atheist, woman vs man, black vs white. Every belief structure is the one true way, every ideology is the winner, every experience is the truth. But how could that be? How is it that there are so many ways, so many winners and so many truths? Well if you’ll let me, I’d like to invite you to look through the same keyhole that I’m looking through so that you might see what I see. Get comfortable, turn on your imagination, and meditate on the ideas to follow.
    How do humans perceive time? Well, it seems clear that we have an extremely narrow vision of time. This narrow vision is probably shown most clearly in our tendency to think only within the confines of our own lifetimes. We’re driven by all kinds of biological and psychological phenomena that help us to survive day to day, week to week, and month to month until we inevitably die, but even after we have ceased to perceive the world, which is really all that death is, the world keeps on going as it always has, and the elements of the body will continue to repurpose themselves as they always have. So in order to fully understand the philosophies, religions, ideologies, and belief structures that we cling to so fervently we must first begin with the understanding that our ability to perceive the

    • 15 min
    Harald Kavli | Translating Epictetus into Norwegian

    Harald Kavli | Translating Epictetus into Norwegian

    ABOUT OUR GUEST
    Harald Kavli, organizer of the Oslo Stoics, is currently translating Epictetus's discourses into modern Norwegian. This will be the first time this classic work of Stoic philosophy is translated into a Scandinavian language.  
    The Oslo Stoics: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1426454074046215/
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    • 42 min
    Philosophy: Our Guide Through Chaos

    Philosophy: Our Guide Through Chaos

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    SHOW SCRIPT: 
    It’s now clear that we’re living in uncertain and unprecedented times. With the coronavirus stretching it’s reach around the world it’s becoming clearer with every new headline that the world we live in is undergoing a shift that will shape generations to come. 
    The great Stoic philosopher Epictetus once remarked that “Circumstances don't make the man, they only reveal him to himself.” In this same way it would be correct to say that global challenge reveals humanity to itself. The kind of global unrest seen at this time is of the sort that breaks down paradigms and reveals to us what’s real and what’s fake, what matters and what doesn’t, what’s worth pursuing and what we can leave aside. We’re living in a time where millions of people will be out of work soon if they aren’t already, governments are debating spending trillions of dollars to keep the economies of the world flowing, and collectively we are being forced into a position where we all need to ask ourselves how we should act in this specific situation and also how we should act moving forward into the rest of this decade which, I assure you, will hold a great deal more challenges than what we’ve seen so far in just the first three months. Ultimately what we’re seeing now is a global shift in consciousness far greater than any of us have seen in our lifetimes, and I think that possibly the most important question to ask at the moment is this: what’s been missing, and therefore what must be rediscovered? 
    For those who are philosophically inclined, these questions aren’t simply stored away for that rainy day or for that global pandemic. Rather, these questions are a part of everyday life. In fact, the Stoic philosopher Seneca once suggested that the budding student of philosophy should do for his mind what the soldier does for his body in times of peace, and that is to rehearse the very horror he hopes to be prepared for, to learn what makes him healthy and what makes him ill, and to exercise those things within his control so that when tragedy strikes he can confidently say, “I knew”. See, the serious student of philosophy may not be surprised by times like these, but rather he might be glad to find that his training has paid off. And this isn’t to say that he wouldn’t experience hardship or difficulties. He may have his fair share of troubles to deal with, but what he wouldn’t say is that he didn’t know. This knowledge brings strength. 
    One particular exercise that the student of philosophy might engage in is that of experiencing the world from an outsider's perspective, so that instead of being a mere player in the game, or being played by the game (whichever side you take on the free will debate), he can stand back and watch the game from afar with the hope that he might come back having learned some of the rules, because as Seneca also said, “if you don't know which port you are sailing to, no wind is favourable.” 
    In a way, we’re all outsiders looking in and interpreting what we see, and we know this because there are as many different ways of conceptualising the world as there are people to conceptualise it, but maybe as an exercise in exploring your ability to reframe your perception you could imagine yourself watching from a different angle. Just for a moment, imagine you’re watching a kind of nature documentary about the most intelligent animals on this planet - humans. Watch from a safe distance and view the scenes of this wonderful tribal animal wandering the earth, creating settlements, towns, and eventually cities. Watch as they develop new ideas, new technologies, and

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

Pete rhe apprentice ,

Great resource for personal improvement

The Practical Stoic provides the opportunity for a daily 5-10 minute snippet of inspiration which is of immense assistance to those seeking a good life.

LaSpaghettino ,

I love this podcast.

Succinct podcasts... each one with its own quality message backed with quotes from stoic philosophers. Very relevant and useful for daily life.

Skinny Robot Kiwi ,

Great podcast!

Very insightful. A great place to start when learning Stoicism.

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