44 episodes

The RunOut Podcast



The RunOut climbing podcast is a lateral discussion of the vertical world, with hosts Chris Kalous (host of The Enormocast podcast) and Andrew Bisharat (climbing journalist, Evening Sends, National Geographic) discussing current events and issues shaping the sport of climbing. Everything from mountaineering, bouldering, sport climbing, big-wall and your grandaddy's trad all covered. Our goal with this experiment in podcasting is to provide easily digestible doses of climbing conversation that we hope you'll find interesting, funny, informative, and makes you feel like you’re sitting around the campfire with us. Now pass the whiskey. ...

The RunOut Podcast The RunOut Podcast

    • Wilderness
    • 5.0, 10 Ratings

The RunOut Podcast



The RunOut climbing podcast is a lateral discussion of the vertical world, with hosts Chris Kalous (host of The Enormocast podcast) and Andrew Bisharat (climbing journalist, Evening Sends, National Geographic) discussing current events and issues shaping the sport of climbing. Everything from mountaineering, bouldering, sport climbing, big-wall and your grandaddy's trad all covered. Our goal with this experiment in podcasting is to provide easily digestible doses of climbing conversation that we hope you'll find interesting, funny, informative, and makes you feel like you’re sitting around the campfire with us. Now pass the whiskey. ...

    RunOut #44: Covid, BLM, and Climbing with Favia Dubyk

    RunOut #44: Covid, BLM, and Climbing with Favia Dubyk

    You may feel like these are uncertain times. But one certainty is that we’re living through history. Right now. A historic pandemic and the biggest civil rights movement of this generation.







    And then there’s climbing, which just sort of feels like the least important thing.







    In Ulysses, James Joyce writes that history is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake.







    It seems as if many people are actually, genuinely beginning to wake up this nightmare and speak its name. Wake up to the injustices of our society. Something feels different to me about these protests. A lot of people who might normally shrug their shoulders have been forced to stop ignoring the uncomfortable truths: that we’re living in a system with two sets of rules. One for people with white skin, one for people of color. One for women, one for men. One for the rich, and one for the rest. And that we really need to come together to fix this.







    This is Andrew Bisharat, and you’re listening to The RunOut. I’m here with my co-host Chris Kalous, and today we’re going to try to unpack this painful, fraught, and historic moment by speaking to one of the most delightful, interesting, and intelligent guests we’ve ever had on our show.







    That would be Dr. Favia Dubyk. She is a pathologist from Albuquerque who is working on the frontlines of the pandemic. She’s also a cancer survivor, a strong climber, a veteran of American Ninja Warrior, and perhaps most important, she’s a strong voice for climbing, and one of many voices that people in climbing media, such as myself, could always be doing more to amplify.







    Chris and I really loved this conversation. Please make sure you follow Favia on Instagram since we reference her feed copiously during this show. Her handle is “@felinefavia.” Without further ado, Dr. Favia Dubyk.

    • 44 min
    RunOut #43: So, Can We Start Climbing Again or What?

    RunOut #43: So, Can We Start Climbing Again or What?

    When I was a young dirtbag, living out of an old sedan, sleeping on my crashpad in a $25 Walmart tent for children, drifting around from one climbing area to the next on what little money I had, I wrestled with the typical questions that keep many young newly college grads awake at night.







    What would I do with my life? What would I become? What would come next?







    Despite these lingering existential concerns, I held fast to my dirtbag lifestyle. Although I had aspirations to do more than just climb, I was also mostly happy sleeping in that stupid purple tent. There was a certain comfort in knowing that even if I failed to amount to anything else in this life, if everything went to shit, I could always go back to doing this—living in a tent, in Yosemite, climbing forever.







    Now even that security has been taken away. Yosemite remains closed. Campgrounds are closed. And many climbing areas are asking out-of-towners to stay away.







    But other climbing areas and corners of society are tentatively opening up, albeit not with a green light, but more of a yellow. Proceed with caution … but do proceed.







    Heightened uncertainty is the flavor of the year. We are actually living in the question, to paraphrase the poet Rainer Marie Rilke. For us, that all-encompassing question is, well, is it ok to start climbing again—or not?







    This is Andrew Bisharat. I’m here with my co-host Chris Kalous. And in this episode Chris and I wade into the murky waters of this question and attempt to parse our strange new reality, which I fear we’ll all be living with for quite some time.







    Hope you enjoy our dialogue and are even listening to it as you drive to discreetly climb somewhere safe while exercising best practices.







    Featured image by Keith Ladzinski.

    • 39 min
    Runout #42: Climbers in Iso: Kelly Cordes

    Runout #42: Climbers in Iso: Kelly Cordes

    Hello friends. It’s time for another edition of Climbers in Iso, our pandemic podcasting mini-series in which Chris Kalous and I, Andrew Bisharat, reach out to our fellow climbers to check in and see how life under lockdown is going.







    To quote Cormac McCarthy from his book The Road, “Nobody wants to be here and nobody wants to leave.” That just about sums up what a full month of self-quarantine feels like for many of us.







    But not today’s guest, who is just now really hitting his stride.







    Today, we’re speaking to one of the saltiest bastards in climbing, Kelly Cordes—a distinguished alpinist, writer, and online provocateur. I say salty bastard … but he’s also salt of the earth. Few people in climbing possess the authentic charm and charismatic delight of Kelly Cordes, even when he is in one of his notoriously misanthropic moods.







    I hope you enjoy this conversation, and please reach out with feedback. For one, Kelly loves seeing people write comments about him on the Internet, so don’t be shy. And if you have any suggestions for who we should be talking to next for our Climbers in Iso mini-series, we’re taking names and numbers now.







    Let the games begin. Here’s Kelly Cordes.

    • 36 min
    RunOut #41: Climbers in Iso: Allison Vest

    RunOut #41: Climbers in Iso: Allison Vest

    One of the hardest parts of being under quarantine right now is our lack of connection to our friends, climbing partners, and people we like to be around. At the moment, it feels right to make a little extra effort to reach out to your network and just check in … You know, see how everyone is doing. See whether they’re losing their minds, writing the next King Lear, or absolutely getting totally fucking yoked on the hangboard.







    It’s with this spirit of reaching out that Chris and I have decided to dedicate a few episodes to checking in with some of our friends and see how they’re holding up. Just a casual call from your friendly neighborhood climbing podcasters.







    This is Andrew Bisharat, and I’m here with my co-host Chris Kalous, and you’re listening to The RunOut podcast.







    Today we’re talking to Allison Vest. Allison is a three-time Canadian national champion. We reached out to Allison because she is an intelligent and interesting person, and she’s totally hilarious. Her slapstick Instagram videos have really been a wonderful dose of humor carrying the climbing world through these darks times. I highly recommend you follow her @allisonvest and see for yourself.







    OK, so with little ado left, all in the form of some jingly podcast music, written by Chris himself, here is our conversation with Allison Vest.

    • 32 min
    RunOut #40: Will Climbing Gyms Survive Covid-19?

    RunOut #40: Will Climbing Gyms Survive Covid-19?

    OK, so America right now is, basically, the second season of The Walking Dead. We know how to kill the enemy, but somehow we still keep getting eating by the zombies. Welcome to the apocalypse, f*****s, only this apocalypse means, no more Moon Boarding at your local gym, and no more climbing at your favorite crag.







    Climbing is canceled.







    This is Andrew Bisharat, and I’m here as always with my smoking hot albeit remote cohost Chris Kalous, and today we’re practicing our social distancing podcasting etiquette while speaking to Fabrizio Zangrilli, a climber, mega alpinist, and, most importantly, the founder and owner of The MonkeyHouse climbing gym in Carbondale, Colorado.







    Fabrizio agreed to speak to us today to share some insight into the real struggles that climbing gyms are going through amid Covid-19. Climbing gyms, of all the outdoor businesses, are getting hammered by this virus. And so Chris and I wanted to hear from the source about what that actually means.







    Times are tough, people. No one knows what the future holds. Except that Glen dies. We totally know that Glen absolutely dies.







    So now, without further ado, Fabrizio Zangrilli.

    • 40 min
    RunOut #39: Will Climbers Actually Stay Home Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic?

    RunOut #39: Will Climbers Actually Stay Home Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic?

    If your podcast diet looks anything like mine, you’re probably oversaturated on coronavirus content. Alas, it’s hard not to talk about covid-19 given it’s a fucking global pandemic and all.







    Climbing gyms around the country are shutting down, and climbers are being advised by the American Alpine Club to not even go climbing outside, particularly in areas surrounding rural communities. Moab has a tourist and camping ban for the next 30 days, Miguel’s Pizza is shut down, and communities from Bishop to Fayetteville are more or less requesting that climbers do not use their newfound time off by traveling to these areas to climb.







    And yet, if there’s one thing I know about climbers, it’s that they will give up their climbing and training when you pry it from their dead, cold hands … perhaps an unfortunate metaphor given the state of affairs.







    This is Andrew Bisharat, and I’m virtually here with my co-host Chris Kalous to talk about the pandemic and its effects on our sport. I fear this is all just the beginning, to be honest. I think we may well see a cancelation of the Olympics, a shut down of National Parks, and other draconian measures soon. It’s all very anxiety-inducing.







    Some of you may have seen that I have been planning to put together a writing and climbing workshop in Mallorca this fall. All those details are on my site Evening Sends. But I just made the decision to postpone the workshop till next spring. Like everyone else, I’m hoping this thing burns out quickly, but given the uncertainty with travel, I just don’t need to be worrying about this right now.







    Simplifying life is a good approach, I think. It helps with the anxiety of the moment. So settle in, folks. Commit to just being home for a while, and you may find a sense of ease in not questioning yourself over whether you could be out sending the gnar. Your project will still be there next fall.







    Photo by Ryan Tetz

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

openthepodbaydoorshal ,

Just climbing.

All they ever talk about is climbing. Heard of canoeing guys? It's not new.

Top Podcasts In Wilderness

Listeners Also Subscribed To