38 episodes

The Sydney Environment Institute, based at the University of Sydney, brings together leading thinkers from across disciplines to address key environmental issues.

The SEI Podcast Series Sydney Environment Institute

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

The Sydney Environment Institute, based at the University of Sydney, brings together leading thinkers from across disciplines to address key environmental issues.

    The Invisible Now: Writing Crisis and the Future Imaginary

    The Invisible Now: Writing Crisis and the Future Imaginary

    Warning: The podcast contains explicit language.

    Just as COVID-19 has laid bare the racial, gender, and economic inequalities upon which our societies are built, the accelerating climate catastrophe has made the violence of capitalism and colonialism inescapable. Yet as social and political structures around the world buckle and break, writers are finding new ways of representing and interrogating the world we inhabit. What is the role of the writer in such a moment? What is the role of writing in helping us imagine and reimagine the future?

    Writers Evelyn Araluen, Tony Birch, and James Bradley examine the power of writing during a moment of multiplying and interconnecting crises.

    Timestamps
    01:00 Introduction and Acknowledgement of Country - Chris Wright
    02:55 Poem: Acknowledgement of Cuntery - Evelyn Araluen
    08:40 Writing in a Time of Converging Crises
    24:15 Growing Realisation That We're Entwined with the Natural World
    43:30 The Role of the Writer in the Age of Crisis
    55:35 Creating Space for Both Grief and Hope
    1:05:40 The Confronting, Violent and Horrific Reality of the Climate Crisis
    1:19:15 Storytelling Through Different Mediums

    Speakers
    Evelyn Araluen, Poet and Researcher
    Professor Tony Birch, Author
    Dr James Bradley, University of Sydney
    Professor Christopher Wright (Chair), University of Sydney

    This event was held via Zoom on Thursday 1 July, 2021.

    • 1 hr 22 min
    Heal Country Series: Heal the Nation and Secure the Future

    Heal Country Series: Heal the Nation and Secure the Future

    Lecturer in Indigenous, intergenerational, environmental and multispecies justice, and SEI Postdoctoral Fellow, Dr Christine Winter explores this year’s NAIDOC week theme ‘Heal Country, Heal the Nation’ in a four-part podcast series. The series asks Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians to explain what ‘Heal Country, Heal the Nation’ means to them. Running through the series is an exploration of First Nations knowledge and philosophies as key to healing (and protecting) human and nonhuman realms.

    In Episode 1 Christine speaks to Justin Ridgeway, a Worimi man and Cultural Heritage Education Manager from the Worimi Local Aboriginal Land Council and Murrook Cultural Centre about why recognising the inextricable links between Country, culture, and identity is fundamental to healing Country and securing the future.

    Timestamps

    00:00 Introduction - Christine Winter
    00:35 Connecting Community with Country
    05:55 Identities and Histories Woven into Country
    13:40 Respecting the Land's Generosity
    19:55 Our Responsibility to Heal the Nation
    24:40 Cultural Identity and Spirituality

    Speakers

    Justin Ridgeway, Worimi Local Aboriginal Land Council and Murrook Cultural Centre
    Dr Christine Winter, Sydney Environment Institute

    Find out more about The Heal Country Podcast Series: https://bit.ly/3xkRuQB

    • 32 min
    Writing The More-Than-Human

    Writing The More-Than-Human

    Today, a range of disciplines are discovering or perhaps acknowledging the many and marvelous capacities and qualities of beings other than humans, the complexity of their relationships, and the twin fallacies of human exceptionalism and individualism. Yet even as what or who we know is undergoing radical transformations, writers find themselves working with the languages and grammars forged to convey and compose worlds we would better leave behind.

    Writers Alexis Wright, Danielle Celermajer and Hayley Singer dissect dominating writing forms and explore how to move beyond human exceptionalism when writing about more-than-human worlds. They reflect on their own writing practices and how they are navigating the challenge of crafting texts that open out to the adventures of living differently and living together that writing might reveal.

    Timestamps
    00:00 Introduction and Acknowledgement of Country - Blanche Verlie
    07:30 Excerpt from The Swan Book - Alexis Wright
    10:55 What Motivates You to Write?
    23:00 Experimenting with Form and Language
    35:25 Who Do You Write For?
    55:50 The Next Direction For Writing
    1:05:05 Giving Voice to the More-Than-Human

    Speakers
    Professor Alexis Wright, University of Melbourne
    Professor Danielle Celermajer, Sydney Environment Institute
    Dr Hayley Singer, University of Melbourne
    Dr Blanche Verlie (Chair), Sydney Environment Institute

    This event was held via Zoom on Thursday 24 June, 2021.

    • 1 hr 26 min
    USU Enviro Week: Changing Our Food System From Within

    USU Enviro Week: Changing Our Food System From Within

    Eating ties us to the social and environmental challenges inherent in our food system. It is a system that is currently unsustainable and rife with injustices: from exploitative labour practices to the pressures of climate change, loss of farmland and food traditions to the disempowerment of communities. And paradoxically, people struggle to put food on the table, whilst so much food goes to waste. COVID-19 has not only made visible these challenges but also spurred visionary local food actors to innovate, cooperate and diversify.

    A panel of change-makers discuss food insecurity and how each of their organisations are tackling this unjust system. We hear from USU operations manager, Ben Pinney, about his work transforming the University’s ‘food system’. Shaun Christie-David, CEO and founder of PlateitForward, will talk about his Sri Lankan restaurant that employs, educates and feeds some of our most vulnerable in the community. And Post-doctoral researcher Kate Johnston shares with us her work with The University of Sydney led food business incubator, FoodLab Sydney, and the intersection of research and community action.

    Each organisation also explains the opportunities that a Community Kitchen Hub on campus can provide. This project needs your support to get up and running. Do you agree that it is time for the University of Sydney to join the local food revolution? Add your voice to this quick survey: https://bit.ly/3sZLolz

    Timestamps

    00:00 Welcome to Country – Yvonne Weldon
    07:00 Introduction – Alana Mann
    11:50 Empowering Communities Through Social Enterprises – Shaun Christie-David
    18:20 Food Insecurity in Universities – Ben Pinney
    26:00 Inspiring a New Generation of Food Entrepreneurs at FoodLab – Kate Johnston
    43:00 Sourcing Sustainable Produce and Packaging
    50:45 Incorporating Indigenous Knowledge into Food Systems
    58:50 The Future of Urban Agriculture in Sydney
    1:05:25 Australia’s Multicultural Banquet
    1:11:50 Launching the USYD Community Kitchen Hub

    Speakers
    Shaun Christie-David, PlateitForward
    Dr Kate Johnston, FoodLab Sydney
    Associate Professor Alana Mann (Chair), FoodLab Sydney
    Ben Pinney, University of Sydney Union
    Yvonne Weldon, Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council

    This event was held at the University of Sydney in partnership with The University of Sydney Union on Tuesday 20 April, 2021.

    • 1 hr 17 min
    The Aesthetics Of Violence

    The Aesthetics Of Violence

    We can’t call out violence in its myriad of forms if we don’t know what it looks like, what it sounds like, or what it feels like.

    This panel discussion will explore the power of the creative and performing arts to transform abstract concepts of violence, into visceral, corporal experiences, and the responses these embodiments can evoke. Hear from prizewinning author Charlotte Wood and an interdisciplinary panel of artists, scholars and practitioners as they reflect on the many ways violence is represented in their own practice.

    Timestamps
    00:00 'the foul of the air' Trailer
    01:15 Introduction and Acknowledgement of Country - Killian Quigley
    06:40 How Violence Embeds Itself Into Different Spaces
    23:05 Ethics vs. Aesthetics
    42:20 Framing Violence in Different Mediums
    53:35 Violence, Beauty and the Sublime
    58:00 Layers of Framing Within Spaces
    1:01:20 Difference Between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Responses to Violent Landscapes
    1:12:05 The Evocative Language of Legal Cases
    1:16:30 Sonically Portraying Violence and the Audience as a Witness or Voyeur
    1:24:40 'And the Curtains are Blowing Slowly' - Michelle St Anne, Will Hansen

    Speakers
    Associate Professor Bruce Isaacs, Department of Art History
    Dr Carolyn McKay, Sydney Institute of Criminology
    Dr Killian Quigley (Chair), Australian Catholic University Melbourne
    Michelle St Anne, Sydney Environment Institute and The Living Room Theatre
    Charlotte Wood, Author

    Musician
    Will Hansen, Double Bassist

    This event was held at the University of Sydney in partnership with The Living Room Theatre on Wednesday 3 March, 2021. For more information visit: https://bit.ly/3sZv84u

    • 1 hr 37 min
    Wilful Ignorance

    Wilful Ignorance

    Drawing on the systemic mechanisms of violence they see emerging in their fields, an interdisciplinary panel, including award-winning journalist Jess Hill, share their insights into the ways that cycles of violence endure within our society.

    To understand and dismantle human and non-human experiences of violence we must begin by addressing the broken systems and structures that not only perpetuate unchecked violence but allow us to remain largely in denial of its insidiousness. The heart of this work lays in recognising the legacies of injustice carried by the landscapes and people that surround us, regardless of the discomfort it invokes. In shedding light on the experiences of survivors, and rendering the invisible visible, we can begin to identify a path where the burden of that violence can be shared and lifted.

    Timestamps
    00:00 'the foul of the air' Trailer
    01:15 Introduction and Acknowledgement of Country - Michelle St Anne
    06:10 Who Has the Right to Dignity? - Megan Mackenzie
    20:00 Coercive Control and Writing About Violence - Jess Hill
    35:20 The Weaponisation of Care - Danielle Celermajer
    52:15 Violence on the Body and Within the Home - Michelle St Anne
    57:35 Failure of the Family Court System
    1:01:40 The Home is a Warzone
    1:05:00 Is Violence an Individual or Societal Issue?
    1:13:00 How to Foster Care for the Non-Human
    1:17:45 'The Natural Way of Things' - Mary Rapp

    Speakers
    Professor Danielle Celermajer (Chair), Sydney Environment Institute
    Jess Hill, Investigative Journalist
    Professor Megan Mackenzie, Simon Fraser University
    Michelle St Anne, Sydney Environment Institute and The Living Room Theatre

    Musician
    Mary Rapp, Multidisciplinary Musician, Composer and Sound Designer

    This event was held at the University of Sydney in partnership with The Living Room Theatre on Wednesday 24 February, 2021. For more information visit: https://bit.ly/38jsHlH

    • 1 hr 20 min

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