53 episodes

Catch up with events produced by the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney with USSC Live. These events offer new insights and perspectives on topics including American foreign policy, economics, politics and culture.

USSC Live The United States Studies Centre

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Catch up with events produced by the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney with USSC Live. These events offer new insights and perspectives on topics including American foreign policy, economics, politics and culture.

    Election Watch: US Politics Web Series with special guest Dr Evelyn Farkas

    Election Watch: US Politics Web Series with special guest Dr Evelyn Farkas

    The Perth USAsia Centre and United States Studies Centre host a monthly web series in which our CEOs review the latest in US politics with a focus on the upcoming US election and US-Indo-Pacific relations. This month's special guest was Evelyn Farkas who was appointed by President Obama to be Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, where she was responsible for US policy toward Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia. In 2020, Ms Farkas was a candidate to represent New York's 17th congressional district. Ms Farkas joined USSC CEO Simon Jackman and Perth USAC CEO Gordon Flake to discuss the top stories in US politics.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Will Democrats take the Senate and the White House?

    Will Democrats take the Senate and the White House?

    With Biden leading Trump by large margins in national polls — and in many battleground state polls — many observers are looking “down ballot”, at elections for Congress and state governorships and legislatures. Might 2020 be a Blue Wave election, in which Democrats not only win the presidency, but retain control of the House of Representatives and even take the Senate? What does the latest analysis — of polls, voter registration data and campaign contributions — suggest about the outcomes of these hundreds of other important elections in November?

    To discuss these issues, USSC hosted a webinar event featuring Managing Partner of GQR Anna Greenberg in conversation with United States Studies Centre’s CEO Professor Simon Jackman.

    • 1 hr
    The Sino-Indian border crisis: Has China pushed India closer to the US and its allies?

    The Sino-Indian border crisis: Has China pushed India closer to the US and its allies?

    Last month, Indian and Chinese troops were involved in the first clash involving the loss of life on both sides since 1975 in Eastern Ladakh. This latest clash between the two most populous nations in the world was preceded by Chinese troops gathering in multiple areas along the disputed border, the erection of new structures near the line of actual control, and ever more expansive Chinese territorial claims at India’s expense.While both sides are taking steps to de-escalate tensions, the ongoing crisis may have fundamentally altered New Delhi’s view of Beijing. The profound strategic ramifications of this could see India shift decisively towards the United States and its allies such as Australia – giving new impetus and relevance to the Australia-US-India-Japan Quad. Given these dynamics:

    - Has India’s threat perception of China fundamentally changed as a consequence of the crisis?
    - How is New Delhi likely to respond militarily, politically and economically?
    - Is India likely to draw closer to the United States and US allies such as Australia?
    - Are we entering a new era of deepening cooperation between Quad countries?
    - Would India’s strategic shift be significantly altered by a Biden administration?

    To discuss these issues, USSC hosted a webinar event featuring Dr Lavina Lee, Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University; Professor C Raja Mohan, Director of the Institute of South Asian Studies; Greg Sheridan, foreign editor at The Australian; and Abhijit Singh, head of the Maritime Policy Initiative at the Observer Research Foundation in India in conversation with USSC Senior Non-Resident Fellow Dr John Lee.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    The future of America's alliances

    The future of America's alliances

    It is nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War. Amidst China’s rise and Russia’s revanchism, and in a historic moment of crisis, will American policymakers reconceive the role alliances should play in 21st century national security strategy and recapture one of the country’s great strategic successes? Or will they let them wither? How will this affect Australia?

    In her new book, Shields of the Republic: The Triumph and Peril of America's Alliances, Mira Rapp-Hooper reveals the remarkable and unheralded success of the United States’ alliance system, charts its dangerous strategic drift, and proposes an agenda for its renewal.

    To discuss these issues, USSC hosted a webinar event featuring Dr Mira Rapp-Hooper, Senior Fellow for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in conversation with Dr Charles Edel, Senior Fellow at the US Studies Centre and Dr John Lee, Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the US Studies Centre.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Enduring economic partners: 15 years of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement

    Enduring economic partners: 15 years of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement

    When the free trade agreement between the United States and Australia (AUSFTA) went into force on January 1, 2005, the two allies were engaged in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, economic globalisation was yet to reach its high watermark, and China’s economy was less than a sixth of the size that it is today. AUSFTA deepened the US-Australia economic relationship, with two-way trade increasing by nearly 80 per cent and investment flows nearly tripling since 2005. But much has changed since 2005, with globalisation in retreat and China the second-largest economy in the world. What lessons ought we draw from the negotiation, adoption and operation of AUSFTA? In an era of economic uncertainty and US-China strategic competition, what lies ahead in the US-Australia economic relationship? What has time revealed about trade liberalisation in the United States and Australia, some fifteen years after AUSFTA and three years since the US withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

    • 1 hr 32 min
    AUSMIN 2020: Bolstering resilience in the Indo-Pacific

    AUSMIN 2020: Bolstering resilience in the Indo-Pacific

    The 30th round of the Australia-United States Ministerial Consultations will soon take place at a time of major global disruption and unprecedented domestic pressure, accelerated by the spread of COVID-19. It is a critical moment for the Australia-US alliance to provide strong and collaborative regional leadership in the Indo-Pacific.

    Bolstering the resilience of our neighbourhood should be at the top of the policy agenda, spanning health security and economic development to the balance of military power and our shared defences against disinformation and cyberattack. Although the United States is mired in a pandemic-fuelled health crisis, and while Australia is only tentatively recovering from COVID-19’s first wave, our shared interests in fostering a healthy, stable and resilient Indo-Pacific cannot be postponed and must be wholeheartedly embraced at AUSMIN 2020.

    To discuss these issues, USSC hosted a webinar on our latest report Bolstering Resilience in the Indo-Pacific: Policy Options for AUSMIN After COVID-19, featuring authors Director of Foreign Policy and Defence Ashley Townshend, Research Fellow Brendan Thomas-Noone, Research Associate Matilda Steward of the United States Studies Centre, and Dr Jeffrey Wilson, Research Director at the Perth USAsia Centre in conversation with Perth USAC CEO Gordon Flake.

    • 1 hr 2 min

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