176 episodes

Catch up with events produced by the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney with USSC Live. These events offer new insights and perspectives on topics including American foreign policy, economics, politics and culture.

USSC Live The United States Studies Centre

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Catch up with events produced by the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney with USSC Live. These events offer new insights and perspectives on topics including American foreign policy, economics, politics and culture.

    Governing AI: How are governments engaging with generative AI?

    Governing AI: How are governments engaging with generative AI?

    Generative artificial intelligence has dominated headlines across the world for the past two years. Popular models include OpenAI’s ChatGPT, Google’s Gemini and image generators like Midjourney. However, generative AI sits at the intersection of several cross-cutting issues – from data governance and privacy to innovative capacity – that impact businesses, government and society at large. As a result, governments are tackling this challenge from very different directions.
    Why are governments so keen to develop generative AI and foundation models? What are governments doing to encourage generative AI? How might that backfire? What controls could be put on the data used to train AI?
    To answer these questions and many more, the Emerging Technology Program at the United States Studies Centre was pleased to host Professor Susan Ariel Aaronson, Research Professor from George Washington University and Director of the Digital Trade and Governance Hub. Susan is also co-principal investigator with the NSF-NIST (National Science Foundation and National Institute of Standards and Technology) Institute for Trustworthy AI in Law & Society, TRAILS, where she leads research on data and AI governance.
    Hayley Channer, Director of the Economic Security Program with the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney hosted the discussion. Hayley has a diverse background having worked as an Australian Government official, Ministerial adviser, think tank analyst, and represented global non-profit organisations.
    Professor Susan Ariel Aaronson’s trip to Australia was made possible by the generous support of the US Department of State.

    • 56 min
    AUKUS, allies and partners

    AUKUS, allies and partners

    AUKUS is making waves internationally as an ambitious program of industrial integration, economic development, and strategic alignment between the US and two of its strongest allies. As other likeminded states in the Indo-Pacific consider their strategic options in a period of rapid geostrategic change, there is increasing discussion of expanding participation in AUKUS through formal and informal partnerships, demonstrated most clearly in a recent decision of the AUKUS defence ministers to consider cooperation with Japan on AUKUS Pillar II advanced capability projects. 
    At this event, panellists Dr Zack Cooper, Senior Fellow, American Enterprise Institute; Professor Peter Dean, Director, Foreign Policy and Defence, United States Studies Centre; Jennifer Parker, Expert Associate at the National Security College, Australian National University and an Adjunct Fellow in Naval Studies at the University of New South Wales Canberra, and Professor Alessio Patalano, Professor of War and Strategy in East Asia discussed the potential for widening AUKUS participation to other likeminded states, including Japan, South Korea, Canada, the Philippines, and New Zealand. 
    Panellists discussed the case for and against expanding participation in AUKUS and what expanded participation in AUKUS would look like in practice. Hayley Channer, Director, Economic Security at the United States Studies Centre moderated the discussion.

    This event was part of the United States Studies Centre's "Next Generation Leaders in the Australia-US Alliance initiative" and was supported by funding from the US State Department.

    • 59 min
    Sydney launch of Red book | Blue book 2024: A guide to the next US administration

    Sydney launch of Red book | Blue book 2024: A guide to the next US administration

    In 2024 we are once again faced with the prospect of either Joe Biden or Donald Trump back in the Oval Office. However, this time we have presidential track records to draw from as we prepare for the next administration. At this event, the United States Studies Centre launched its latest report Red Book | Blue Book 2024, a guide for decision-makers regarding the next US presidential administration.
    Which policies will be most impacted by a change in leadership? What will a second Biden or Trump term mean for Australia? What should Australian decision-makers know and do under President Trump vs. President Biden?
    The event featured authors of the report across two panel discussions.
    Panel 1: How will a second President Trump or President Biden term impact AUKUS, relations with China and alliances in Asia?
    Dr Michael Green, Chief Executive OfficerProfessor Peter Dean, Director of Foreign Policy and DefenceHayley Channer, Director of Economic SecurityPanel 2: How will political dynamics in Congress and the White House affect trade policy and relationships with the White House?
    Dr John Kunkel, Senior Economic AdviserBruce Wolpe, Non-Resident Senior FellowVictoria Cooper, Non-Resident FellowJared Mondschein, Director of Research

    • 1 hr 29 min
    Parliament House, Canberra launch of Red book | Blue book 2024: A guide to the next US administration

    Parliament House, Canberra launch of Red book | Blue book 2024: A guide to the next US administration

    In 2024 we are once again faced with the prospect of either Joe Biden or Donald Trump back in the Oval Office. However, this time we have presidential track records to draw from as we prepare for the next administration. At this event, the United States Studies Centre launched its latest report Red Book | Blue Book 2024, a guide for decision-makers regarding the next US presidential administration.
    Which policies will be most impacted by a change in leadership? What will a second Biden or Trump term mean for Australia? What should Australian decision-makers know and do under President Trump vs. President Biden? The event featured a number of the report's authors in a panel discussion:
    Dr Michael Green, Chief Executive Officer, United States Studies CentreHayley Channer, Director of Economic Security, United States Studies CentreProfessor Peter Dean, Director of Foreign Policy and Defence, United States Studies CentreDr John Kunkel, Senior Economic Adviser, United States Studies CentreJared Mondschein, Director of Research, United States Studies Centre

    • 52 min
    The future of democracy in the Pacific and Southeast Asia

    The future of democracy in the Pacific and Southeast Asia

    The United States Studies Centre hosted a launch event for the USSC major report, Aligning values and interests: Japanese and Australian democracy support in the Pacific and Southeast Asia.
    No issues have aligned Japan and Australia more than the multi-faceted challenges China poses, particularly in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. Yet as Japan and Australia have drawn closer than ever in areas of security, trade and regional aid, there remains far more work to be done in response to China’s erosion of democratic norms.
    How can Australia and Japan — two of the largest regional development partners — better support democracy in the region? How can they align their strategic priorities with the needs of a complex and emerging region? What role should the United States have in their efforts?
    To answer these questions, USSC CEO Dr Michael Green moderated a discussion with report editor USSC Non-Resident Senior Fellow Dr Lavina Lee and report author Dr John Lee, Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute.

    • 1 hr 26 min
    Climate transition heating up: The race for the clean energy transition in the Indo-Pacific

    Climate transition heating up: The race for the clean energy transition in the Indo-Pacific

    The Albanese and Biden governments are united in positing that climate change poses an existential threat and are modernising their alliance relationship to tackle it. Major efforts are underway to boost renewable technology innovation, harness critical minerals and bolster domestic manufacturing to accelerate the clean energy transition. Yet significant hurdles remain to realising bilateral climate ambitions.
    Australia and the United States must navigate the simultaneous challenges of decarbonising, building their domestic industrial bases, supporting the energy transition across their region, and competing with China for new sectors.
    Are Australia and the United States competing when it comes to the clean energy transition? What has Australia-US climate cooperation promised and can it deliver? How can Australia and the United States balance their international climate efforts with boosts to manufacturing at home?
    To answer these questions, USSC hosted a live event with Australia’s Ambassador for Climate Change Kristin Tilley, USSC Women in the Alliance Visiting Fellow Jane Nakano, and USSC Non-Resident Senior Fellow Meg McDonald in conversation with USSC Director of Economic Security Hayley Channer.
    This event was hosted by the United States Studies Centre’s Women in the Alliance initiative.

    • 1 hr 29 min

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