51 episodes

The biggest group chat of the week – hosted by Richie Brave.

1Xtra Talks BBC

    • Society & Culture

The biggest group chat of the week – hosted by Richie Brave.

    Black women in music

    Black women in music

    What do we lose when black women are pushed out of music?

    Richie talks to Drew Dixon about her allegations of harassment and rape in the music industry, and about 'On the Record', the documentary she's made with director Amy Ziering about her experiences.

    And we're broadening out the conversation: across the industry, black women aren't able to take their seats at the table, or they feel they can't shine they way they should. Richie chats to journalist Chi Chi Izundu and Loretta Andrews from Safe Management about how music suffers when black women don't have a voice. And we hear from music manager Amanda Maxwell and DJ Ruby Savage about the ways they're hoping to create some real change.

    If you have been affected by sexual abuse or violence, help and support is available. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/22VVM5LPrf3pjYdKqctmMXn/information-and-support-sexual-abuse-and-violence

    • 51 min
    What's in store for 2021?

    What's in store for 2021?

    Richie Brave hears from those in the know about what to expect in 2021. He's kicking off the new year by asking what news stories from around the world we should keep an eye on, how we can look after ourselves and what music and culture we can look forward to.

    We hear from radio presenter Shay Sade, who also hosts Ubunifu Space, a YouTube channel that celebrates African music and youth culture. Shay talks about how she’s been adapting to the pandemic as a creative and what she’s excited about in 2021.

    Lanre Bakare is Arts and Culture correspondent at the Guardian. He shares the big new releases coming up this year across music and film - from Kendrick Lamar’s highly anticipated new album (and one from Rhi Rhi, maybe!) to Judas and the Black Messiah, a film about the life of the African-American Black Panther Fred Hampton starring Daniel Kaluuya.

    Looking ahead to current affairs, De’Graft Mensah from Newsbeat joins to help us make sense of the latest COVID news and what we can expect from Brexit. Journalist Amandla Thomas Johnson takes us around the world to look at big headlines - from the farmers' strike in India, to youth uprisings in Nigeria and Uganda and how people around the world are mobilising in new ways against the climate crisis.

    Finally, 2020 was a rough year - leaving many of us asking about how we live, work and look after ourselves. Psychotherapist Sital Panesar joins us to give some tips to stay grounded and connected, and build joy into our days.

    • 53 min
    Small Axe

    Small Axe

    With Small Axe on our screens, we’re celebrating black British art and storytelling as a form of resistance. Richie and Shahlaa are chatting to poets, musicians, writers and actors about the way they tell their stories, and the importance of hearing from past generations.

    • 53 min
    Lockdown, shielding and me

    Lockdown, shielding and me

    Lockdown 2.0 has begun, but as we all get used to staying in again, some of us have to be extra careful. Richie and Shahlaa are chatting to people who spent the first lockdown shielding because they’re at a higher risk if they catch Covid.

    What was it like staying indoors for nearly five whole months? How did they cope? How are they feeling as we head into winter? We get some top tips from therapist Dawn Estefan, and we hear from Aviah Day, who’s been organising mutual aid networks about how we can all help each other in these tough times.

    And Richie’s been seeing some disturbing takes about Covid on his timeline: some people seem to think that it only affects old people or people who have medical conditions, so it doesn’t matter. Nubi Jones and Katouche Goll tell us how that makes them feel as people who are at high risk. Is it a sign of discrimination in favour of non-disabled people? Kamran Mallick, CEO of Disability Rights UK, tells us what he’s seeing.

    And it’s 25 years since the Disability Discrimination Act was passed. Before that, it was totally legal to discriminate against disabled people. Campaigner Simone Aspis, who back in the day chained herself to buses to demand change, tells us why the DDA was so important.

    • 54 min
    Food Poverty: Who Gets Free School Meals?

    Food Poverty: Who Gets Free School Meals?

    Richie Brave and Shahlaa Tahira about access to free school meals in the UK, the wider context of child food insecurity in the UK.

    We hear from Christina Adane, the 17-year-old campaigner who, at the start of the COVID pandemic, launched the petition to ask the government to enable access to free school meals during school holidays. It was this campaign that caught the attention of celebrities such as Marcus Rashford.

    Syed Kamall, research director at the Institute of Economic Affairs, explains why there is a debate about around access to free school meals in the holidays.

    The Food Foundation is an organisation campaigning for healthy, sustainable food systems. Shahlaa speaks to some of their youth ambassadors from their Children’s Right 2 Food campaign to hear more about their manifesto for change.

    Finally, Dee Woods, food educator, activist and founder of the Granville Community Kitchen, in Kilburn. She shares her thoughts about long term change for child food poverty and the importance of community power in tackling hunger this Christmas with COVID.

    • 53 min
    Policing in the UK

    Policing in the UK

    Reece Parkinson and Shahlaa Tahira explore future possibilities of policing in the UK.

    Members of the UFFC, a coalition of families in the UK whose loved ones have died in police custody, share their stories ahead of their annual memorial service. We hear from Yasmin Forbes, cousin of Edson Da Costa; Janet Alder, sister to Christopher Alder; and Marcia Rigg, sister to Sean Rigg.

    Deborah Coles from Inquest talks about deaths in police custody in the UK and structural racism in policing.

    And in England and Wales, black people are nine times more likely to be stopped and searched by the police than white people. Black people are eight times more likely to be tasered than white people. Black people are six times more likely to be handcuffed than white people. And black people are three times as likely as white people to be arrested.

    Melissa from the Network for Police Monitoring shares her top tips on what to do if you are stopped and searched or arrested.

    Former police officer Bami Jolaoso, from the Centre for Justice Innovation, shares her thoughts on reforming the criminal justice system, and Dr Adam Elliot Cooper talks through what defunding the police in the UK could look like.

    We also hear from a protestor in Nigeria, following the shooting of demonstrators in Lagos.

    • 53 min

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