65 episodes

AllAboutAudiology is a podcast hosted by Dr. Lilach Saperstein, an audiologist helping parents and teachers of children with hearing loss, or anyone interested in hearing health, to understand audiology topics. On the podcast, we explore how hearing works and discuss tools for becoming empowered advocates. Every other week, in the All About YOU segment, Dr. Saperstein answers your questions about anything from ear infections and tubes to deciding on cochlear implant surgery, deaf education, and sign language. In addition to: "My baby didn't pass the hearing screening!" "My child can hear but doesn't understand!" "Is my child deaf?" "Should I use sign language?" "Do I need a hearing aid?" "Should I get my hearing tested?" "Pros and cons of cochlear implants" "What are ear tubes" and much more.

All About Audiology - Hearing Resources to Empower YO‪U‬ Lilach Saperstein

    • Medicine

AllAboutAudiology is a podcast hosted by Dr. Lilach Saperstein, an audiologist helping parents and teachers of children with hearing loss, or anyone interested in hearing health, to understand audiology topics. On the podcast, we explore how hearing works and discuss tools for becoming empowered advocates. Every other week, in the All About YOU segment, Dr. Saperstein answers your questions about anything from ear infections and tubes to deciding on cochlear implant surgery, deaf education, and sign language. In addition to: "My baby didn't pass the hearing screening!" "My child can hear but doesn't understand!" "Is my child deaf?" "Should I use sign language?" "Do I need a hearing aid?" "Should I get my hearing tested?" "Pros and cons of cochlear implants" "What are ear tubes" and much more.

    All about YOU: Genetic Hearing Loss Life Experience” – Episode 65 with Olivia Rains

    All about YOU: Genetic Hearing Loss Life Experience” – Episode 65 with Olivia Rains

    Read the full transcript here







    Instagram connected Dr. Lilach and this week’s guest, Olivia Rains. Olivia shares how her hearing loss has affected the quality of her life at all different stages. Listen in as Olivia provides an authentic view into her life living with her cookie-bite, mixed, hearing loss. She touches on topics including the importance of including the child in the process of their diagnosis, trauma that might stem from medical treatment, as well as the individuality of a case-by-case hearing loss.







    3:00: Olivia creates artwork under her brand, Last Nerve Anatomy Art. Olivia is thankful that people have connected to her artwork and have expressed how her work has inspired them along their audiological journey.















    7:00: Acting aloof and progressing differently than her twin sister, were among the signs that suggested that something was up with Olivia’s hearing. One of Olivia’s grade-school teacher’s voiced concern and helped bring in the intervention of a speech therapist to help her case.







    12:00: A doctor once put tubes in one of Olivia’s ears without giving her any anesthesia. This traumatic experience resurfaced when future doctors evaluated her during medical interventions. It is important for doctors to face patients and walk their patients through the operation that they perform on patients, in a trauma-informed practice.







    15:00: Piano lessons helped Olivia in ways that surpassed the reasoning behind why she was initially enrolled in music lessons. Every student is different and one needs to take a students’ frequencies and configurations into consideration to understand their hearing and speech development.







    17:00: A cleft lip or cleft palate is often associated with ear infections. If your child has either issue, it is very important to be hyper-aware of their health and ensure your loved one receives continuous testing. Often parents may believe their child is whining too much or that they are only hearing what they want to hear- get their hearing tested!







    26:00: Auditory processing is different from hearing loss. Rephrasing versus repeating is very important.







    35:00: Real time captioning and sign language interpreters are accommodations that have helped Olivia. It is crucial to provide a child who has a hearing loss with accomodations to ensure that they can be a member of the hearing world.







    42:00: Her mom once left Olivia crying in the car while she was complaining about pain. This experience added to Olivia’s trauma. It is important to talk through pain and not ignore it.







    For more resources and research visit:







    http://lastnerveart.com/







    https://www.instagram.com/mama.hu.hears/?hl=en







    Mentioned In this episode:







    All About Advocacy Organizations – Episode 59 with Oren Dvoskin and Damien Kelman, Bekol







    An upcoming episode with Juliana Pedri that focuses on Auditory Processing







    Listen Next/Related Episodes









    a href="https://allaboutaudiology.com/all-about-trauma-informed-practice-episode-37...

    • 51 min
    All About The AUD Student Experience – Episode 64 – with Ina Selita

    All About The AUD Student Experience – Episode 64 – with Ina Selita

    Read the full transcript here







    Ina S. Selita, a third year AUD student at The CUNY Graduate Center (which is also the same program that Dr. Saperstein graduated from) is the creator of Neuro-Hear. Neuro-Hear is a website that takes textbook based audiology concepts and explains them in easy to understand ways. In today’s episode, Dr. Saperstein and Ina talk about the AUD experience and what it takes to become an Audiologist. Tune in to learn about Ina’s experience of implanting rats with cochlear implants, tips to have a semester with limited stress, and the ways in which social media can influence the spread of information that focuses on audiology!















    If you are interested in Communication Sciences, Communication Disorders, Speech Therapy or Audiology, this is the episode for you. If not, check out another episode at: https://allaboutaudiology.com/







    4:25- Ina implanted rats with cochlear implants







    Ina cold-emailed professors in the NYC area in search of a research position. She got a volunteer position at NYU and eventually built herself up to be hired as a full-time research associate.







    12:50: Synopsis of Ina’s research: 







    Ina created a new system for Cochlear Implants insertion, stimulation, and behavioral training in rats which involved rat auditory training and Rat ABR’s.







    14:50: When Ina decided against medical school and looked into audiology







    “It was all organic chemistry.” Ina decided that she did not want to be in school for so long and decided that she wanted to do AUD since such a track allows her to work in either clinic, educational or consultant audiology.







    19:00 COVID affecting the educational experience of audiology students 







    Students are struggling to get the complete training, and are not receiving the hands-on work with actual patients. Ina struggled with completing her required hours since she saw a minimum number of patients. 







    26:00 Positives of going through Graduate School during COVID







    Ina realized that certain people have trouble hearing and understanding even without wearing masks in their day to day lives (since everyone has been wearing masks recently!). Ina has become more empathetic to her patients who have trouble hearing as a part of their regular day to day experience.







    27:30: Self-care during Graduate School 







    As a grad student, you needs to accept that things will be stressful. Thus, it is healthy to have proper coping mechanisms. It is also important to find hobbies outside of audiology.







    30:00 Medical School vs. Graduate School







    Graduate School has peaks and valleys but it is nothing like business or the demanding residency of medical training. 







    31:30: Planning your semester and scheduling the semester







    Once you get your syllabi, schedule your semester. Get ahead on projects when you have limited work.







    34:00: Working with your cohort of peers







    You are going through the same grad experience and classes and it is good to support one another and find study pals or share notes. Though, balance this with doing what’s right for you and do not compare yourself to others.







    37:05: Ina’s post graduation plans







    Ina is intrigued by everything in the field but wants to work with clients within a clinic...

    • 41 min
    All About Educational & Informational Audiological Counseling – Episode 63 – with Dr. Sarah Sparks

    All About Educational & Informational Audiological Counseling – Episode 63 – with Dr. Sarah Sparks

    Read the full transcript here







    Today’s guest is Dr. Sarah Sparks, who is the founder of Audiology Outside the Box, a new audiology telepractice. She provides clinical services to clients in DC, Maryland, Virginia, and Massachusetts along with educational resources on communication and audiology-related topics. Dr. Sparks’ goal includes wanting to “provide a space where people can get support for their unique communication needs with an audiologist who communicates in both ASL and spoken/written English.” At the end of the day, she believes that Deaf culture and audiology have a place where they exist together and it is her mission to bring about this change.















    This week on the All About Audiology podcast:  







    * 1:45: How Dr. Sparks Got Into Audiology







    Before losing her hearing, she was fluent in spoken English. This is a different experience than someone who is born deaf. She started to study audiology around the time she started losing her hearing.







    * 3:25 What makes a “successful” cochlear implant hearing patient?







    Dr. Sparks became a cochlear implant recipient while studying for her doctorate of audiology between the first and second year of her AUD program. Talk about a truly hands-on and practical experience!







    * 5:30 Dr. Sparks’ early access and knowledge about The Deaf Community







    As an elementary school student, she befriended a young friend in elementary school who was deaf. She feels privileged to have been exposed to such a community at an early age.







    * 9:05: Dr. Sparks’ training at Gallaudet University







    During her educational experience, Dr. Sparks learned that many assumptions she initially held about audiology were not necessarily correct. For example, audiologists in The U.S. do not only work with kids; they actually work with adults too.







    * 13:00: What services do audiologists offer?  Initially, she was a teacher, and from this previous experience, she believes that the educational aspect of audiology is not addressed enough. She thinks that audiologists do not explain clients’ diagnoses and experiences thoroughly  enough to them. Though, audiologists are not always paid to tap into the educational aspects of their patients’ conditions, since time is limited during appointments.







    * 16:00 What stands out about Dr. Sparks’ “Audiology Outside the box”







    She tries to take more time during appointments. Since appointments are not always provided in various modalities, she tries to fill in for what’s missing by providing services in different modalities (i.e English, ASL SimCom or Cued-speech). 







    * 19:30: Telehealth options along with her education vs. counseling services 







    Dr. Sparks’ education and upcoming webinar components are accessible to the general public (i.e. through social media platforms) since they focus on general info about audiology. While, her personalized counseling services are offered to individuals clients, on a case by case basis, in locations where she is licensed (DC, VA, MD, MA).







    * 23:15 The Medical-Audiological Model







    Sign language isn’t “just an option if a cochlear implant does not work out.” ASL is its own language and not just a modality! Dr. Sparks suggests that a child should be fluent in at least one language in order to have an option to communicate and she truly believes that there is benefit of knowing sign language ev...

    • 49 min
    All About The Parent Journey – Episode 62 – with Liba Lurie

    All About The Parent Journey – Episode 62 – with Liba Lurie

    Read the full transcript here







    Liba Lurie is a parent, psychologist, and creator of the 5 Step Framework to Stop Reacting and Start Responding to Your Kids. 















    In today’s episode, she tells the story of how her son was diagnosed with hearing loss, and explains why it’s so important for children to have parents who remember to look after themselves, too. 







    This week on the All About Audiology podcast:  







    * 1:49 – Liba’s son’s kindergarten teacher brought to her attention that her son was having some difficulty with pronunciation. A hearing test revealed that he was struggling due to hearing loss. 







    * 5:49 – It can be hard to pinpoint mild hearing loss since it can sometimes be mistaken for something else, such as behavioral issues. This may cause it to go undiagnosed for a long time.







    * 7:14 – As one of the 5 senses, hearing plays a huge role in processing the information we receive from the outside world. For those who can’t hear, it can sometimes feel like they are living in a different reality.







    * 9:37 – Liba had two positive experiences that helped her to better understand her son’s hearing loss: the explanation given to her by the person who did her son’s hearing assessment, and the simulation shown to her by his audiologist.







    * 15:57 – It’s important for parents to take care of themselves, too. Not doing so can have a negative impact on the connection and relationship they have with their children.







    * 17:09 – Sometimes, emotions can be conflicting. When Liba found out her son wouldn’t be able to serve in the Israeli Army due to his hearing loss, she was relieved he would never be in combat. However, there was also a sense of grief that came with the knowledge that he wouldn’t be able to serve his country.







    * 22:17 – It can be easy to become overcome by guilt, and wonder if as a parent you did something wrong to cause your child’s diagnosis—but you did not! Grief is a process that you must move through in order to eventually reach a point of acceptance.







    * 25:35 – There are many resources that can help families after a diagnosis is received. Parents deserve to have support, and children deserve to have parents who feel safe and secure enough to guide them through life.







    * 36:20 – It’s important to have support from family and friends, but they aren’t always the best person to reach out to when you need help. Speaking to a therapist can be a great option.







    * 42:02 – There are times where you might receive resistance from people in your life who don’t understand the decisions you are making for your child. You may not be able to control the words or actions of others, but you CAN control your response.







    * 46:48 – Knowing what your goals are for the future are important in being able to make difficult decisions in the present moment. Sometimes a decision that feels inconvenient, such as switching doctors or schools, will push you towards your end goal. 







    For more resources and research visit:







    All About Audiology Website 







    All About Audiology Facebook group  







    a href="https://www.instagram.

    • 51 min
    All About the Importance of the Parent-Audiologist Relationship – Episode 61 with Janet DesGeorges

    All About the Importance of the Parent-Audiologist Relationship – Episode 61 with Janet DesGeorges

    Read the full transcript here







    Hands and Voices is a parent-led support organization dedicated to providing support to families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.







    Today I am speaking with their Co-Founder and Executive director, Janet DesGeorges whose own daughter was diagnosed with hearing loss as a baby. 























    This week on the All About Audiology podcast: 







    * 1:46 – When Janet’s daughter failed a childhood hearing test, she suggested to the audiologist that maybe her daughter’s attention was focused elsewhere. The audiologist scheduled a retest for the following day, and Janet felt that this was a positive experience since she felt listened to and acknowledged.







    * 6:54 – Sometimes it can be hard to accept a diagnosis, not because the parents don’t believe it, but because they can’t believe it. They might wonder if the information the doctor has given them is accurate.







    * 9:50 – The ability to advocate for your child develops over time. The more you understand, the more confident you will be. 







    * 13:13 – When the audiologist told Janet of her daughter’s hearing loss, she felt that the news was delivered with kindness. Unfortunately, this kind of news is not always delivered with empathy.







    * 16:22 – There often tends to be a dynamic between patients and doctors, where the doctor is the authority and the patient is expected to listen to them. Sometimes, a patient might lie to the doctor because they are afraid of “getting into trouble”.







    * 18:16 – During one part of the hearing test, where a probe is placed in the ear, Janet’s daughter began screaming in pain but the audiologist told Janet it was normal. Janet did not yet have the knowledge or experience to advocate for her daughter in that situation.







    * 20:54 – Although it may be just another half hour for the doctor delivering the news, the family on the receiving end of a diagnosis will remember that moment forever. 







    * 26:37 – Instead of asking yes or no questions, clinicians should ask more thought-provoking questions or even provide a list of question prompts. This will help the family get the most benefit from their appointment.







    * 31:27 – Remember to provide your child with moments where they can just be a kid. Advocating is important, but so are regular childhood experiences.







    * 34:23 – In the beginning, it can be difficult to differentiate between fact and opinion, and you will often be on the receiving end of both. The important thing is raising your child to be a healthy, happy communicative adult who can live independently.







    * 38:28 – Take in as much information as you can, see if it applies to your life and child, and if it doesn’t—let it go. What works for your child is what makes a choice correct.







    * 43:30 – As parents, you can only work with the information you have at the time. Sometimes decisions will change down the road as a child grows and begins to make their own choices.







    * 49:11 – Advice for professionals – spend some time getting to know who is sitting across from you. Look at their chart, learn their name, and think about what they might want to get out of their appointment. 







    * 52:02 – Advice for parents – many professionals are going to come in and out of your life and some experiences won’t be positive.

    • 58 min
    All About Online Safety- Episode 60 with Lisa Honold

    All About Online Safety- Episode 60 with Lisa Honold

    Read the full transcript here







    In the digital world we now live in, it’s important to remember to speak to your children about online safety. Depending on your child’s age, you might have some worries about setting and keeping boundaries around screen time.







    On today’s podcast, I’m joined by Lisa Honold from the Center for Online Safety. Lisa shares great tips for navigating this discussion with our children in a way that will make them feel respected, while keeping them safe.







    This week on the All About Audiology podcast:







    * 1:04 – Lisa has two hard of hearing  children, and one child with normal hearing. 







    * 5:28 – It’s not common for everyone to know someone with hearing loss, and a parent’s first experience with audiology is often when their child is diagnosed. 







    * 11:22 – Choosing a mode of communication is not an easy decision to make, but knowing all of the options available to you will help you make an informed decision. There is no right or wrong decision, every family is different! 







    * The 5 Step Guide to Navigating Your Child’s Hearing Loss is a great starting point filled with helpful information, and can be found on our website.







    * 17:07 – It can be really helpful in the early years to join parent & child groups, especially ones where the children are a few years older than yours are. You can learn a lot of practical tips from other parents who have already been through it.







    * 19:35 – Mutual respect between parents and medical experts is key to getting the best care for your child. Remember that although doctors are experts in their field of expertise, YOU are the expert on your child. Do what is right for you and your family!







    * 21:13 – Follow your baby’s lead, and everything will be ok no matter which path you go down. Make sure to carve out time for things that aren’t hearing loss related, and enjoy spending time with your baby.







    * 28:27 – Screen time Safety: The average age kids are seeing “adult material” is 11. If there is no way to supervise screens, we will have no idea what our kids are learning about or forwarding to other children. 







    * 30:32 – We teach kids fire safety, how to safely cross the street, and how to protect themselves in various situations. We need to remember to add online safety to this list.







    * 34:01 – Lisa categorizes three main “buckets” of screen time: Passive, Connection and Creation. Since home education has now massively increased, there is also now another type — Education.







    * 36:19 – Talk to your kids about limits and set up a “technology contract” with them, so that they feel involved in the decision making. An app such as Bark can send you notifications that will alert you to inappropriate situations that your child might need help with. 







    * 41:29 – Choose your battles wisely, sometimes it’s better to stay behind-the-scenes while monitoring the situation closely. If something is happening that needs immediate attention, go to your child and have an honest discussion.







    * 43:49 – If your child is having a playdate or sleepover away from home, make sure you set boundaries. Find out what kind of devices/apps your child is going to have access to and tell them if there is anything you’d like them to avoid using with your child.

    • 53 min

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